Birth of the Federal constitution; A history of the New Hampshire convention for the investigation, discussion and decision of the federal ... was ratified by the ninth state, and thus re

 
9781236140227: Birth of the Federal constitution; A history of the New Hampshire convention for the investigation, discussion and decision of the federal ... was ratified by the ninth state, and thus re
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1888 Excerpt: ...History of Concord, p. 549. Capt. Joseph Walker, who at a considerably later time commanded a large company of cavalry, resident in Concord and neighboring towns, was accustomed to notify meetings of his company by verbal notices to such members as he happened to see at the meeting-house on Sunday. These were sufficient, although many were not present, and some lived in Canterbury and Northfield. J. B. W. roads, or of carriages, went to meeting on horseback. A man and woman often rode double,.the former upon a saddle in front, and the latter upon a pillion behind.1 Why this custom was confined to married and elderly persons tradition does not say. For the convenience of persons riding thus there was a mounting-block, near the north-west corner of the meeting-house. This consisted of a circular flat stone, eight feet in diameter, raised about three feet from the ground. A few steps led to the top of it, from which many of the early inhabitants easily mounted their horses at the close of divine service. This ancient "horse-block," as it was 1" ' Going to meeting,' as it was called, on the Sabbath, was for seventy-five years and more the universal custom. Elderly people, who owned horses, rode double--that is, the wife with her husband, seated on a pillion behind him, with her right arm encircling his breast. The young people of both sexes went on foot from every part of the parish. In summer, young men usually walked barefoot, with shoes in hand; and the young women walked with coarse shoes, carrying a better pair in hand, with stockings, to change before entering the meeting-house. The usual custom of those west of Long Pond was to stop at a large pine tree at the bottom of the hill west of Richard Bradley's, where the boys and young men put o...

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