Statistics of power and machinery employed in manufactures Volume 1; reports on the water-power of the United States

 
9781236207661: Statistics of power and machinery employed in manufactures Volume 1; reports on the water-power of the United States
View all copies of this ISBN edition:
 
 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1885 Excerpt: ...flow in the lake waters, but it is hardly to be conceived that there should be an appreciable tide, properly so called; and, it seems not improbable that the explanation of the changes of level may lje in the fact, which has been observed, that, during portions of the year at least, there is commonly a south wind on the lake in the forenoon and a north wind in the afternoon. The scenery upon this lake and from the surrounding heights is most charming. At the northern end the banks are comparatively low, but advancing southward they become high and steep; thence eastward from the lake there is a gradual rise by smooth fertile slopes to the summit of a ridge which separates Seneca and Cayuga lakes, and which near their head attains an altitude of 700 or 800 feet above the water. The lake is thus seen to occupy a long, narrow, and deep depression among the hills, the depth of which would appear twice as great were the water removed. The bottom is said to be composed of gravel and rock, while the sides are frequently precipitous masses of solid rock. In 1880 an accurate survey of the lake by the engineering students of Cornell university was in progress, and by the kindness of Professor C. L. Crandall the following results of soundings were furnished to the author: Deptlw of Seneca lake. Feet Four miles south of Geneva 250 Eight miles south of Geneva (off Dey's Landing) 430 Twelve miles south of Geneva (off Dresden, or opposite the inlet from Keuka lake) 500 Eighteen miles south of Geneva (off Lodi Landing) 580 The lake is navigable throughout the year, for it is only in remarkably cold seasons that it even becomes skimmed over with ice, except near the foot, and there it freezes but slightly. Canal-boats descend from Elm'ira through the Chemung canal and are t...

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

(No Available Copies)

Search Books:



Create a Want

If you know the book but cannot find it on AbeBooks, we can automatically search for it on your behalf as new inventory is added. If it is added to AbeBooks by one of our member booksellers, we will notify you!

Create a Want