The principles of practical perspective, or, scenographic projection; containing universal rules for delineating designs on various surfaces and ... to which are added, rules for shadowing,

 
9781236265746: The principles of practical perspective, or, scenographic projection; containing universal rules for delineating designs on various surfaces and ... to which are added, rules for shadowing,
View all copies of this ISBN edition:
 
 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1815 Excerpt: ...will give points through which the perspective angles of the groin are to be drawn. For the other bays of groins, draw their perspective seats on the ground plane, which is easily done by producing lines from angle to angle, as e, e, &c. at the base; then bring down the lines 1 and 3 to the plan b,b, which draw to the vanishing point E, and if lines are drawn from g,g,g, Sec. tx the ceiling above, it will give the perspective points in the ceiling through which to trace the distant arches: and by this means arches may be continued on ad infinitum. The known height of the door must be set up on the angle of the front pier, as p, t, and drawn to the angle of the wall in which the door is to be placed, then produced to its station by a horizontal line: for the width, set the known measure on the line p,p, centrical, and produce it to E, which. will determine its visual size in the distant end of the avenue. The side arches are ascertained by bringing down the visual lines from the plan to intersect with the horizontal lines n,n,n, with which they accord. The arch qx,qx,qx, is traced from the arch i 1, 2, i3r merely to shew its geometrical form; for if the arch q, q is narrower than the arch m, m (the groin being of an equal pitch), it will form a semi-ellipsis on the minor diameter in a geometrical elevation, and if wider, vice versa. OBSERVATIONS. A small portion of sky gives height to a building, and a great height will reduce it. I have frequently observed in architectural drawings, that, after the architect has designed a very grand building, which he has intended to be the principal feature in his picture, he has'introduced an immense tree in the fore-groiiRd, by which he has lessened his building and made it subordinate to the landscape. Whenever arc...

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

(No Available Copies)

Search Books:



Create a Want

If you know the book but cannot find it on AbeBooks, we can automatically search for it on your behalf as new inventory is added. If it is added to AbeBooks by one of our member booksellers, we will notify you!

Create a Want