The family flora and materia medica botanica Volume 1 ; containing the botanical analysis, natural history, and chemical and medical properties and uses of plants

 
9781236374899: The family flora and materia medica botanica Volume 1 ; containing the botanical analysis, natural history, and chemical and medical properties and uses of plants

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1854 Excerpt: ...hypogynous, in several rows, imbricate in aestivation. Stamens. Indefinite, hypogynous, distinct, with short filaments, and adnate anthers. Ovary. Several, in many rows, upon an elongated torus. Fruit. Follicular or baccate, one-two-seeded. Seeds. Attached to the inner suture of the carpels, from which they are suspended by a long, delicate funiculus. The Secondary Characters. Magnolia. Sepals five, often wanting or petaloid. Petals six-twelve, caducous. Carpels two-valved, one-twoseeded, imbricated into a cone. Seeds baccate, subcordate, and suspended, when mature, by a long funiculus. Calyx three-scpalled. Carol six or nine petalled. Carpels numerous, imbricate on a strobile-like spike, two-valved. Seeds drilled, pendulous on long cords, berrylike. The Specific Characters. Magnolia Glauca. Leaves oval, glaucous beneath. Petals obovate, tapering to the base. Flowers terminal, white, solitary, of three sepals and several concave petals. Leaves oval, glaucous beneath. Petals obovate, tapering to the base. The Artificial Characters. Class Polyandria. Stamens twenty or more, arising from the receptacle. (Hypogynous.) Order Polygnia. Leaves never peltate. Trees with large, showy flowers. NATURAL HISTORY. The Magnolia Glauca, though in general a small tree, in the Southern States sometimes attains the height of forty feet, and a diameter of twelve or fourteen inches. Its most common height is from twenty to thirty feet, though it is frequently found flowering luxuriantly when it has reached a height of five or six feet only. In the New England States, clusters of this Magnolia, in full flower, may be seen, the largest individual among which does not exceed four feet in height, and all of them are much more deserving the appellation of bushes, or shrubs, than tre...

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