The pictorial book of anecdotes and incidents of the war of the rebellion, civil, military, naval and domestic from the time of the memorable toast ... to the assassination of President Lincoln,

 
9781236459756: The pictorial book of anecdotes and incidents of the war of the rebellion, civil, military, naval and domestic from the time of the memorable toast ... to the assassination of President Lincoln,
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1884 Excerpt: ...one of his chief aids-decamp. General Grant arrived about fifteen minutes later than General Lee, and entered the parlor where the latter was awaiting him. The two generals greeted each other with dignified courtesy, and after a few moments conversation, proceeded to the business before them. Lee spirits, and the rebel army was doomed, immediately alluded to the conditions Lee's lost effort was that of attempting to named by General Grant for the surren Surrender of Gen. Lee and his Army to Gen. Gran: cut his way through Sheridan's lines, but it totally failed. On the seventh, a correspondence, looking to the surrender of Lee's army, commenced between himself and General Grant, the purport of General Lee's first note being to ascertain the best terms on which he could surrender his army. General Grant's reply not being to Lee's mind, the latter communicated to General Grant a request for a personal interview at a certain place, at ten o'clock on the morning of the ninth, to arrange "terms of peace." As this was changing the question at issue, and under discussion, and one which General Grant had neither the inclination nor the authority to decide, he replied in a note which admitted of no misconstruction, and which virtually ended the negotiations. der, characterized them as exceedingly lenient, and said he would gladly leave all the details to General Grant's own discretion. The latter stated the terms of parole--that the arms should be stacked, the artillery parked, and the supplies and munitions turned over to him, the officers retaining their side arms, horses, and personal effects. General Lee promptly assented to the conditions, and the agreement of surrender was engrossed and signed by General Lee at half-past three o'clock. Thus substantia...

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