The Mystery at the Carrol Ranch: A Story of the Southwest (Classic Reprint)

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9781330107393: The Mystery at the Carrol Ranch: A Story of the Southwest (Classic Reprint)

Excerpt from The Mystery at the Carrol Ranch: A Story of the Southwest

"Who fell and was trampled on?" demanded Mrs. Easton, coming up breathless and pale with apprehension.

"Mr. Carrol die. He's hurt some."

"Oh, he isn't hurt badly - don't say that he is hurt badly!" Nora exclaimed, her face white under all its abiding tan.

"Well, you see, we couldn't tell just how bad he is hurt," the range rider admitted, "because he didn't know nothin', and -

"Do you mean that he was unconscious?" cried Mrs. Easton, in consternation.

"Why - yes - I reckon that's the dictionary word for it. Anyway, he's as limp as a rag baby. The boys are bringin' him home. Big Pete, he rode over Rosita way to fetch the doctor -"

"The doctor!" Mrs. Easton echoed the words with a groan. "Is he as badly hurt as that?"

One of his legs is broke, sure. We can't tell yet whether they're all broke, or not. He was down, all of a heap, and the cattle trampin' over him; nobody can't tell exactly what did happen, but we 'low that he'll come to his senses again."

The rider, Fred Brown, gathered up his reins, but lingered to explain: "The boys they thought I'd better come on ahead and kind of prepare you-all, like. They'll be close at hand, now, and I must hurry back and meet 'em. They thought, the boys did," he insisted awkwardly, "that it might be easier for you if I come ahead and kind o' broke the news to you."

"Thank you for doing it," said Nora, faintly. Her stricken face bore so piteous a look that Fred was constrained to add, as he again turned his horse's head toward the round-up camp on the Cimarron, where the accident had taken place, "It may be that there ain't more 'n one of his legs broke; we couldn't be sure, you know." He touched his horse and was gone, while Nora and her grandmother reentered the house; there the bright bits of print scattered about the dining-room table first at tracted Mrs. Easton's attention.
"Put away your quiltin' pieces, child. There's no tellin' when you'll get a chance to work on 'em again - maybe never. This is a dretful thing to have happen to us, right at the beginnin' of the round-up season, too! We lost pretty nigh all our crops last year by flood, and nigh all the cattle the year before by winter storms. But, for all that, you won't hear me makin' any complaint. I'm used to sufferin' in silence.

"I did begin to think that maybe we'd get a little forehanded this year, but that hope's all over with now. Dear, dear! what a time it will be for us all! For, if I do say it, James' temper ain't none of the best at any time. You know yourself, Nora - and there's no use in denyin' it -that many's the time when it would be safer, as well as pleasanter, to touch off a bunch of cannon crackers than to cross him.

"Now what are you cryin' about? Look at me - I ain't uttered a word of complaint, nor sha'n't, not if I run my legs off, as I prob'ly shall, waitin' on him."

"Oh, poor father! Grandma, they are bringing him home on a stretcher!"

"What in time would you have them bring him home on? A pitchfork?"

But, despite her protestations, Mrs. Easton's ruddy face grew a shade paler as the vision of her son-in-law returning in this helpless fashion to the home that he had left, well and strong, a few hours before, presented itself to her imagination.

"We'd best get his bed ready," she added, in a subdued voice, while Nora hastily gathered up the last of her pieces.

In the midst of the preparations in the injured man's bedroom, Mrs. Easton suddenly remarked:

"What puzzles me is to know what on earth James was tryin' to cut out cattle for, anyway. That's work for the most skillful cowboys - which your father ain't. Now, you know that as well as I do, Eleanor."

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Carl Louis Kingsbury
Published by Forgotten Books, United States (2015)
ISBN 10: 133010739X ISBN 13: 9781330107393
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Book Description Forgotten Books, United States, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. Excerpt from The Mystery at the Carrol Ranch: A Story of the Southwest Who fell and was trampled on? demanded Mrs. Easton, coming up breathless and pale with apprehension. Mr. Carrol die. He s hurt some. Oh, he isn t hurt badly - don t say that he is hurt badly! Nora exclaimed, her face white under all its abiding tan. Well, you see, we couldn t tell just how bad he is hurt, the range rider admitted, because he didn t know nothin , and - Do you mean that he was unconscious? cried Mrs. Easton, in consternation. Why - yes - I reckon that s the dictionary word for it. Anyway, he s as limp as a rag baby. The boys are bringin him home. Big Pete, he rode over Rosita way to fetch the doctor - The doctor! Mrs. Easton echoed the words with a groan. Is he as badly hurt as that? One of his legs is broke, sure. We can t tell yet whether they re all broke, or not. He was down, all of a heap, and the cattle trampin over him; nobody can t tell exactly what did happen, but we low that he ll come to his senses again. The rider, Fred Brown, gathered up his reins, but lingered to explain: The boys they thought I d better come on ahead and kind of prepare you-all, like. They ll be close at hand, now, and I must hurry back and meet em. They thought, the boys did, he insisted awkwardly, that it might be easier for you if I come ahead and kind o broke the news to you. Thank you for doing it, said Nora, faintly. Her stricken face bore so piteous a look that Fred was constrained to add, as he again turned his horse s head toward the round-up camp on the Cimarron, where the accident had taken place, It may be that there ain t more n one of his legs broke; we couldn t be sure, you know. He touched his horse and was gone, while Nora and her grandmother reentered the house; there the bright bits of print scattered about the dining-room table first at tracted Mrs. Easton s attention. Put away your quiltin pieces, child. There s no tellin when you ll get a chance to work on em again - maybe never. This is a dretful thing to have happen to us, right at the beginnin of the round-up season, too! We lost pretty nigh all our crops last year by flood, and nigh all the cattle the year before by winter storms. But, for all that, you won t hear me makin any complaint. I m used to sufferin in silence. I did begin to think that maybe we d get a little forehanded this year, but that hope s all over with now. Dear, dear! what a time it will be for us all! For, if I do say it, James temper ain t none of the best at any time. You know yourself, Nora - and there s no use in denyin it -that many s the time when it would be safer, as well as pleasanter, to touch off a bunch of cannon crackers than to cross him. Now what are you cryin about? Look at me - I ain t uttered a word of complaint, nor sha n t, not if I run my legs off, as I prob ly shall, waitin on him. Oh, poor father! Grandma, they are bringing him home on a stretcher! What in time would you have them bring him home on? A pitchfork? But, despite her protestations, Mrs. Easton s ruddy face grew a shade paler as the vision of her son-in-law returning in this helpless fashion to the home that he had left, well and strong, a few hours before, presented itself to her imagination. We d best get his bed ready, she added, in a subdued voice, while Nora hastily gathered up the last of her pieces. In the midst of the preparations in the injured man s bedroom, Mrs. Easton suddenly remarked: What puzzles me is to know what on earth James was tryin to cut out cattle for, anyway. That s work for the most skillful cowboys - which your father ain t. Now, you know that as well as I do, Eleanor. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic boo. Bookseller Inventory # APC9781330107393

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Carl Louis Kingsbury
Published by Forgotten Books, United States (2015)
ISBN 10: 133010739X ISBN 13: 9781330107393
New Paperback Quantity Available: 10
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Book Description Forgotten Books, United States, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.Excerpt from The Mystery at the Carrol Ranch: A Story of the Southwest Who fell and was trampled on? demanded Mrs. Easton, coming up breathless and pale with apprehension. Mr. Carrol die. He s hurt some. Oh, he isn t hurt badly - don t say that he is hurt badly! Nora exclaimed, her face white under all its abiding tan. Well, you see, we couldn t tell just how bad he is hurt, the range rider admitted, because he didn t know nothin , and - Do you mean that he was unconscious? cried Mrs. Easton, in consternation. Why - yes - I reckon that s the dictionary word for it. Anyway, he s as limp as a rag baby. The boys are bringin him home. Big Pete, he rode over Rosita way to fetch the doctor - The doctor! Mrs. Easton echoed the words with a groan. Is he as badly hurt as that? One of his legs is broke, sure. We can t tell yet whether they re all broke, or not. He was down, all of a heap, and the cattle trampin over him; nobody can t tell exactly what did happen, but we low that he ll come to his senses again. The rider, Fred Brown, gathered up his reins, but lingered to explain: The boys they thought I d better come on ahead and kind of prepare you-all, like. They ll be close at hand, now, and I must hurry back and meet em. They thought, the boys did, he insisted awkwardly, that it might be easier for you if I come ahead and kind o broke the news to you. Thank you for doing it, said Nora, faintly. Her stricken face bore so piteous a look that Fred was constrained to add, as he again turned his horse s head toward the round-up camp on the Cimarron, where the accident had taken place, It may be that there ain t more n one of his legs broke; we couldn t be sure, you know. He touched his horse and was gone, while Nora and her grandmother reentered the house; there the bright bits of print scattered about the dining-room table first at tracted Mrs. Easton s attention. Put away your quiltin pieces, child. There s no tellin when you ll get a chance to work on em again - maybe never. This is a dretful thing to have happen to us, right at the beginnin of the round-up season, too! We lost pretty nigh all our crops last year by flood, and nigh all the cattle the year before by winter storms. But, for all that, you won t hear me makin any complaint. I m used to sufferin in silence. I did begin to think that maybe we d get a little forehanded this year, but that hope s all over with now. Dear, dear! what a time it will be for us all! For, if I do say it, James temper ain t none of the best at any time. You know yourself, Nora - and there s no use in denyin it -that many s the time when it would be safer, as well as pleasanter, to touch off a bunch of cannon crackers than to cross him. Now what are you cryin about? Look at me - I ain t uttered a word of complaint, nor sha n t, not if I run my legs off, as I prob ly shall, waitin on him. Oh, poor father! Grandma, they are bringing him home on a stretcher! What in time would you have them bring him home on? A pitchfork? But, despite her protestations, Mrs. Easton s ruddy face grew a shade paler as the vision of her son-in-law returning in this helpless fashion to the home that he had left, well and strong, a few hours before, presented itself to her imagination. We d best get his bed ready, she added, in a subdued voice, while Nora hastily gathered up the last of her pieces. In the midst of the preparations in the injured man s bedroom, Mrs. Easton suddenly remarked: What puzzles me is to know what on earth James was tryin to cut out cattle for, anyway. That s work for the most skillful cowboys - which your father ain t. Now, you know that as well as I do, Eleanor. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic boo. Bookseller Inventory # APC9781330107393

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Carl Louis Kingsbury
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Book Description Forgotten Books, United States, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . This book usually ship within 10-15 business days and we will endeavor to dispatch orders quicker than this where possible. Brand New Book. Excerpt from The Mystery at the Carrol Ranch: A Story of the Southwest Who fell and was trampled on? demanded Mrs. Easton, coming up breathless and pale with apprehension. Mr. Carrol die. He s hurt some. Oh, he isn t hurt badly - don t say that he is hurt badly! Nora exclaimed, her face white under all its abiding tan. Well, you see, we couldn t tell just how bad he is hurt, the range rider admitted, because he didn t know nothin , and - Do you mean that he was unconscious? cried Mrs. Easton, in consternation. Why - yes - I reckon that s the dictionary word for it. Anyway, he s as limp as a rag baby. The boys are bringin him home. Big Pete, he rode over Rosita way to fetch the doctor - The doctor! Mrs. Easton echoed the words with a groan. Is he as badly hurt as that? One of his legs is broke, sure. We can t tell yet whether they re all broke, or not. He was down, all of a heap, and the cattle trampin over him; nobody can t tell exactly what did happen, but we low that he ll come to his senses again. The rider, Fred Brown, gathered up his reins, but lingered to explain: The boys they thought I d better come on ahead and kind of prepare you-all, like. They ll be close at hand, now, and I must hurry back and meet em. They thought, the boys did, he insisted awkwardly, that it might be easier for you if I come ahead and kind o broke the news to you. Thank you for doing it, said Nora, faintly. Her stricken face bore so piteous a look that Fred was constrained to add, as he again turned his horse s head toward the round-up camp on the Cimarron, where the accident had taken place, It may be that there ain t more n one of his legs broke; we couldn t be sure, you know. He touched his horse and was gone, while Nora and her grandmother reentered the house; there the bright bits of print scattered about the dining-room table first at tracted Mrs. Easton s attention. Put away your quiltin pieces, child. There s no tellin when you ll get a chance to work on em again - maybe never. This is a dretful thing to have happen to us, right at the beginnin of the round-up season, too! We lost pretty nigh all our crops last year by flood, and nigh all the cattle the year before by winter storms. But, for all that, you won t hear me makin any complaint. I m used to sufferin in silence. I did begin to think that maybe we d get a little forehanded this year, but that hope s all over with now. Dear, dear! what a time it will be for us all! For, if I do say it, James temper ain t none of the best at any time. You know yourself, Nora - and there s no use in denyin it -that many s the time when it would be safer, as well as pleasanter, to touch off a bunch of cannon crackers than to cross him. Now what are you cryin about? Look at me - I ain t uttered a word of complaint, nor sha n t, not if I run my legs off, as I prob ly shall, waitin on him. Oh, poor father! Grandma, they are bringing him home on a stretcher! What in time would you have them bring him home on? A pitchfork? But, despite her protestations, Mrs. Easton s ruddy face grew a shade paler as the vision of her son-in-law returning in this helpless fashion to the home that he had left, well and strong, a few hours before, presented itself to her imagination. We d best get his bed ready, she added, in a subdued voice, while Nora hastily gathered up the last of her pieces. In the midst of the preparations in the injured man s bedroom, Mrs. Easton suddenly remarked: What puzzles me is to know what on earth James was tryin to cut out cattle for, anyway. That s work for the most skillful cowboys - which your father ain t. Now, you know that as well as I do, Eleanor. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic boo. Bookseller Inventory # LIE9781330107393

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