Dictionary of National Biography, Vol. 29 (Classic Reprint)

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9781330562895: Dictionary of National Biography, Vol. 29 (Classic Reprint)
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Excerpt from Dictionary of National Biography, Vol. 29

Inglis, Charles (1731 P-1791), rear-admiral, a younger son of Sir John Inglis of Cramond, bart., entered the navy in 1745 on board the Ludlow Castle, with Captain George Brydges (afterwards Lord) Rodney [q. v.] He followed Rodney to the Eagle, and in that ship was present in Hawke's action with L'Etenduere on 14 Oct. 1747. After three years in the Eagle he was appointed to the Tavistock with Captain Francis Holburne. He passed his examination on 5 Feb. 1755, being then, according to his certificate, more than twenty-three years of age, and the next day he was promoted to be lieutenant of the Monarch, with Captain Abraham North. In April 1756 he was appointed to the Magnanime, with Captain Wittewronge Taylor; turned over, with him, to the Royal William on 3 June 1757 [cf. Howe, Richard, Earl], and a fortnight later was promoted to the command of the Escort sloop, attached to the expedition to Rochefort under Sir Edward (afterwards Lord) Hawke [q. v.] In June 1759 he was appointed to the Carcass bomb, part of the force under Rodney which bombarded Havre and destroyed the flat-bottomed boats there in July. On 15 Dec. 1761 he was posted to the Newark of 80 guns, which early in the following year went out to the Mediterranean with the broad pennant of Commodore Sir Peircy Brett. He returned to England after the peace, and on the occasion of the Spanish armament in 1770 was appointed to command the Lizard frigate. In August 1778 he commissioned the Salisbury of 50 guns, in which he went out to Jamaica, and on 12 Dec. 1779 captured the San Carlos, a Spanish privateer of 60 guns, and laden with military stores, in the Bay of Honduras. In the following summer he returned to England, and when the Salisbury was paid off was appointed to the 64-gun ship St. Albans, one of the fleet under Vice-admiral Darby at the relief of Gibraltar in March 1781. Towards the end of the year he was sent out to the West Indies in charge of convoy, and having joined the flag of Sir Samuel (afterwards Viscount) Hood [q. v.] at Barbadoes, was with him during his attempt to relieve St. Kitts, 25 Jan. 1782. Afterwards, in the battle of 12 April, the St. Albans was the second ship astern of the Formidable, and passed through the enemy's line closely following her and the Namur. In August 1782 the St. Albans went to North America with Admiral Pigot, and returned to England after the peace. Inglis had no further service, but was promoted to be rear-admiral on 21 Sept. 1790. and died on 10 Oct. 1791.

His son Charles, first lieutenant of the Penelope in her remarkable engagement with the Guillaume Tell [see Blackwood, Sir Henry], was immediately promoted to command the Petrel, and in her led the fleet under Lord Keith into the harbour of Marmorice, during a violent gale, on 1 Jan. 1801 (Parson, Nelsonian Reminiscences, p. 80). He was advanced to post rank on 29 April 1802, and died, still a captain, on 27 Feb. 1833.

[Charnock's Biog. Nav. vi. 455; Commission and Warrant Books in Public Record Office]

J. K. L.

Inglis, Charles (1734-1816), bishop of Nova Scotia, was born, apparently, in New York, in 1734.

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Book Description Forgotten Books, 2015. Paperback. Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. Excerpt from Dictionary of National Biography, Vol. 29 Inglis, Charles (1731 P-1791), rear-admiral, a younger son of Sir John Inglis of Cramond, bart., entered the navy in 1745 on board the Ludlow Castle, with Captain George Brydges (afterwards Lord) Rodney [q. v.] He followed Rodney to the Eagle, and in that ship was present in Hawke s action with L Etenduere on 14 Oct. 1747. After three years in the Eagle he was appointed to the Tavistock with Captain Francis Holburne. He passed his examination on 5 Feb. 1755, being then, according to his certificate, more than twenty-three years of age, and the next day he was promoted to be lieutenant of the Monarch, with Captain Abraham North. In April 1756 he was appointed to the Magnanime, with Captain Wittewronge Taylor; turned over, with him, to the Royal William on 3 June 1757 [cf. Howe, Richard, Earl], and a fortnight later was promoted to the command of the Escort sloop, attached to the expedition to Rochefort under Sir Edward (afterwards Lord) Hawke [q. v.] In June 1759 he was appointed to the Carcass bomb, part of the force under Rodney which bombarded Havre and destroyed the flat-bottomed boats there in July. On 15 Dec. 1761 he was posted to the Newark of 80 guns, which early in the following year went out to the Mediterranean with the broad pennant of Commodore Sir Peircy Brett. He returned to England after the peace, and on the occasion of the Spanish armament in 1770 was appointed to command the Lizard frigate. In August 1778 he commissioned the Salisbury of 50 guns, in which he went out to Jamaica, and on 12 Dec. 1779 captured the San Carlos, a Spanish privateer of 60 guns, and laden with military stores, in the Bay of Honduras. In the following summer he returned to England, and when the Salisbury was paid off was appointed to the 64-gun ship St. Albans, one of the fleet under Vice-admiral Darby at the relief of Gibraltar in March 1781. Towards the end of the year he was sent out to the West Indies in charge of convoy, and having joined the flag of Sir Samuel (afterwards Viscount) Hood [q. v.] at Barbadoes, was with him during his attempt to relieve St. Kitts, 25 Jan. 1782. Afterwards, in the battle of 12 April, the St. Albans was the second ship astern of the Formidable, and passed through the enemy s line closely following her and the Namur. In August 1782 the St. Albans went to North America with Admiral Pigot, and returned to England after the peace. Inglis had no further service, but was promoted to be rear-admiral on 21 Sept. 1790. and died on 10 Oct. 1791. His son Charles, first lieutenant of the Penelope in her remarkable engagement with the Guillaume Tell [see Blackwood, Sir Henry], was immediately promoted to command the Petrel, and in her led the fleet under Lord Keith into the harbour of Marmorice, during a violent gale, on 1 Jan. 1801 (Parson, Nelsonian Reminiscences, p. 80). He was advanced to post rank on 29 April 1802, and died, still a captain, on 27 Feb. 1833. [Charnock s Biog. Nav. vi. 455; Commission and Warrant Books in Public Record Office] J. K. L. Inglis, Charles (1734-1816), bishop of Nova Scotia, was born, apparently, in New York, in 1734. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. Seller Inventory # AAV9781330562895

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Book Description Forgotten Books, 2015. Paperback. Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.Excerpt from Dictionary of National Biography, Vol. 29 Inglis, Charles (1731 P-1791), rear-admiral, a younger son of Sir John Inglis of Cramond, bart., entered the navy in 1745 on board the Ludlow Castle, with Captain George Brydges (afterwards Lord) Rodney [q. v.] He followed Rodney to the Eagle, and in that ship was present in Hawke s action with L Etenduere on 14 Oct. 1747. After three years in the Eagle he was appointed to the Tavistock with Captain Francis Holburne. He passed his examination on 5 Feb. 1755, being then, according to his certificate, more than twenty-three years of age, and the next day he was promoted to be lieutenant of the Monarch, with Captain Abraham North. In April 1756 he was appointed to the Magnanime, with Captain Wittewronge Taylor; turned over, with him, to the Royal William on 3 June 1757 [cf. Howe, Richard, Earl], and a fortnight later was promoted to the command of the Escort sloop, attached to the expedition to Rochefort under Sir Edward (afterwards Lord) Hawke [q. v.] In June 1759 he was appointed to the Carcass bomb, part of the force under Rodney which bombarded Havre and destroyed the flat-bottomed boats there in July. On 15 Dec. 1761 he was posted to the Newark of 80 guns, which early in the following year went out to the Mediterranean with the broad pennant of Commodore Sir Peircy Brett. He returned to England after the peace, and on the occasion of the Spanish armament in 1770 was appointed to command the Lizard frigate. In August 1778 he commissioned the Salisbury of 50 guns, in which he went out to Jamaica, and on 12 Dec. 1779 captured the San Carlos, a Spanish privateer of 60 guns, and laden with military stores, in the Bay of Honduras. In the following summer he returned to England, and when the Salisbury was paid off was appointed to the 64-gun ship St. Albans, one of the fleet under Vice-admiral Darby at the relief of Gibraltar in March 1781. Towards the end of the year he was sent out to the West Indies in charge of convoy, and having joined the flag of Sir Samuel (afterwards Viscount) Hood [q. v.] at Barbadoes, was with him during his attempt to relieve St. Kitts, 25 Jan. 1782. Afterwards, in the battle of 12 April, the St. Albans was the second ship astern of the Formidable, and passed through the enemy s line closely following her and the Namur. In August 1782 the St. Albans went to North America with Admiral Pigot, and returned to England after the peace. Inglis had no further service, but was promoted to be rear-admiral on 21 Sept. 1790. and died on 10 Oct. 1791. His son Charles, first lieutenant of the Penelope in her remarkable engagement with the Guillaume Tell [see Blackwood, Sir Henry], was immediately promoted to command the Petrel, and in her led the fleet under Lord Keith into the harbour of Marmorice, during a violent gale, on 1 Jan. 1801 (Parson, Nelsonian Reminiscences, p. 80). He was advanced to post rank on 29 April 1802, and died, still a captain, on 27 Feb. 1833. [Charnock s Biog. Nav. vi. 455; Commission and Warrant Books in Public Record Office] J. K. L. Inglis, Charles (1734-1816), bishop of Nova Scotia, was born, apparently, in New York, in 1734. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. Seller Inventory # AAV9781330562895

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Book Description Forgotten Books, 2015. Paperback. Condition: New. Language: English . This book usually ship within 10-15 business days and we will endeavor to dispatch orders quicker than this where possible. Brand New Book. Excerpt from Dictionary of National Biography, Vol. 29 Inglis, Charles (1731 P-1791), rear-admiral, a younger son of Sir John Inglis of Cramond, bart., entered the navy in 1745 on board the Ludlow Castle, with Captain George Brydges (afterwards Lord) Rodney [q. v.] He followed Rodney to the Eagle, and in that ship was present in Hawke s action with L Etenduere on 14 Oct. 1747. After three years in the Eagle he was appointed to the Tavistock with Captain Francis Holburne. He passed his examination on 5 Feb. 1755, being then, according to his certificate, more than twenty-three years of age, and the next day he was promoted to be lieutenant of the Monarch, with Captain Abraham North. In April 1756 he was appointed to the Magnanime, with Captain Wittewronge Taylor; turned over, with him, to the Royal William on 3 June 1757 [cf. Howe, Richard, Earl], and a fortnight later was promoted to the command of the Escort sloop, attached to the expedition to Rochefort under Sir Edward (afterwards Lord) Hawke [q. v.] In June 1759 he was appointed to the Carcass bomb, part of the force under Rodney which bombarded Havre and destroyed the flat-bottomed boats there in July. On 15 Dec. 1761 he was posted to the Newark of 80 guns, which early in the following year went out to the Mediterranean with the broad pennant of Commodore Sir Peircy Brett. He returned to England after the peace, and on the occasion of the Spanish armament in 1770 was appointed to command the Lizard frigate. In August 1778 he commissioned the Salisbury of 50 guns, in which he went out to Jamaica, and on 12 Dec. 1779 captured the San Carlos, a Spanish privateer of 60 guns, and laden with military stores, in the Bay of Honduras. In the following summer he returned to England, and when the Salisbury was paid off was appointed to the 64-gun ship St. Albans, one of the fleet under Vice-admiral Darby at the relief of Gibraltar in March 1781. Towards the end of the year he was sent out to the West Indies in charge of convoy, and having joined the flag of Sir Samuel (afterwards Viscount) Hood [q. v.] at Barbadoes, was with him during his attempt to relieve St. Kitts, 25 Jan. 1782. Afterwards, in the battle of 12 April, the St. Albans was the second ship astern of the Formidable, and passed through the enemy s line closely following her and the Namur. In August 1782 the St. Albans went to North America with Admiral Pigot, and returned to England after the peace. Inglis had no further service, but was promoted to be rear-admiral on 21 Sept. 1790. and died on 10 Oct. 1791. His son Charles, first lieutenant of the Penelope in her remarkable engagement with the Guillaume Tell [see Blackwood, Sir Henry], was immediately promoted to command the Petrel, and in her led the fleet under Lord Keith into the harbour of Marmorice, during a violent gale, on 1 Jan. 1801 (Parson, Nelsonian Reminiscences, p. 80). He was advanced to post rank on 29 April 1802, and died, still a captain, on 27 Feb. 1833. [Charnock s Biog. Nav. vi. 455; Commission and Warrant Books in Public Record Office] J. K. L. Inglis, Charles (1734-1816), bishop of Nova Scotia, was born, apparently, in New York, in 1734. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. Seller Inventory # LIE9781330562895

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