The Territory of Dakota: The State of North Dakota; The State of South Dakota; An Official Statistical, Historical and Political Abstract; ... and General Statements (Classic Reprint)

0 avg rating
( 0 ratings by Goodreads )
 
9781331598169: The Territory of Dakota: The State of North Dakota; The State of South Dakota; An Official Statistical, Historical and Political Abstract; ... and General Statements (Classic Reprint)

Excerpt from The Territory of Dakota: The State of North Dakota; The State of South Dakota; An Official Statistical, Historical and Political Abstract; Agricultural, Mineral, Commercial, Manufacturing, Educational, Social, and General Statements

Dakota is twain. It was the largest territory in the republic, with area sufficient to give quarter-section farms each to 603,728 families. By its side large eastern stats and old world kingdoms dwarfed into mere communities. In 1870 it had only 15,000 population; in 1889 it became two states of the Federal Union, each possessing a hospitable people, cultured society, an excellent public school system with ample funds, fine buildings and good schools, churches of every denomination, a superior newspaper press, commercial facilities of a high order, railroad advantages equal to any, the conveniences of modern city life and the comforts of rural homes, situated within a short distance of markets, railroads and telegraphs, and every element and privilege of high civilization.

Whatever may be said of division, there will always be much in common between North and South Dakota. Division was inevitable. The great territory contained three one-sided centres of population, widely separated and differing in social interests, products and transportation facilities. The first settlement was in the southeast, the second in the northeast and the third in the southwest; the first spread along the Missouri and Big Sioux rivers, the second along the Red River of the North, and both engaged in farming, while the third was in the Black Hills, where the principal occupation was mining. The Red river country and outlying districts, developed by the extensions of railroads from St. Paul, Minneapolis and Duluth, produce wheat; southeast Dakota added corn to the small grains produced, and had outlets on systems of railroads leading to Chicago and other distributing points. The Black Hills were long isolated, but found communication with the outside world through a system identified with southeast Dakota, and with which it will be more closely connected as soon as the opening reservation allows the laying of additional bands of steel, and thus make a united south state. These facts, together with great size of the territory, made arguments for division, which event happily hits been accomplished without friction or ill-feeling between the two new states. Any idea that there is not much in common now between the two stats is a wrong one. For a long time all sections have had the same laws, and men from every part of the territory met in conventions - political, social, benevolent, religious and educational - in legislative assembly, and there was common brotherhood. Officially there will be no more such meetings; each state will hereafter have its own conventions, meetings and elections; yet there is and always will be a strong bond of union between the two states.

About the Publisher

Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com

This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

Buy New View Book
List Price: US$ 13.57
US$ 26.22

Convert Currency

Shipping: FREE
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.

Destination, Rates & Speeds

Add to Basket

Top Search Results from the AbeBooks Marketplace

1.

Frank H Hagerty
Published by Forgotten Books, United States (2015)
ISBN 10: 1331598168 ISBN 13: 9781331598169
New Paperback Quantity Available: 10
Print on Demand
Seller:
The Book Depository US
(London, United Kingdom)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Forgotten Books, United States, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. Excerpt from The Territory of Dakota: The State of North Dakota; The State of South Dakota; An Official Statistical, Historical and Political Abstract; Agricultural, Mineral, Commercial, Manufacturing, Educational, Social, and General Statements Dakota is twain. It was the largest territory in the republic, with area sufficient to give quarter-section farms each to 603,728 families. By its side large eastern stats and old world kingdoms dwarfed into mere communities. In 1870 it had only 15,000 population; in 1889 it became two states of the Federal Union, each possessing a hospitable people, cultured society, an excellent public school system with ample funds, fine buildings and good schools, churches of every denomination, a superior newspaper press, commercial facilities of a high order, railroad advantages equal to any, the conveniences of modern city life and the comforts of rural homes, situated within a short distance of markets, railroads and telegraphs, and every element and privilege of high civilization. Whatever may be said of division, there will always be much in common between North and South Dakota. Division was inevitable. The great territory contained three one-sided centres of population, widely separated and differing in social interests, products and transportation facilities. The first settlement was in the southeast, the second in the northeast and the third in the southwest; the first spread along the Missouri and Big Sioux rivers, the second along the Red River of the North, and both engaged in farming, while the third was in the Black Hills, where the principal occupation was mining. The Red river country and outlying districts, developed by the extensions of railroads from St. Paul, Minneapolis and Duluth, produce wheat; southeast Dakota added corn to the small grains produced, and had outlets on systems of railroads leading to Chicago and other distributing points. The Black Hills were long isolated, but found communication with the outside world through a system identified with southeast Dakota, and with which it will be more closely connected as soon as the opening reservation allows the laying of additional bands of steel, and thus make a united south state. These facts, together with great size of the territory, made arguments for division, which event happily hits been accomplished without friction or ill-feeling between the two new states. Any idea that there is not much in common now between the two stats is a wrong one. For a long time all sections have had the same laws, and men from every part of the territory met in conventions - political, social, benevolent, religious and educational - in legislative assembly, and there was common brotherhood. Officially there will be no more such meetings; each state will hereafter have its own conventions, meetings and elections; yet there is and always will be a strong bond of union between the two states. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. Bookseller Inventory # AAV9781331598169

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 26.22
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

2.

Frank H. Hagerty
Published by Forgotten Books (2015)
ISBN 10: 1331598168 ISBN 13: 9781331598169
New Paperback Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
Irish Booksellers
(Rumford, ME, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Forgotten Books, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. book. Bookseller Inventory # M1331598168

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 26.23
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

3.

Frank H Hagerty
Published by Forgotten Books, United States (2015)
ISBN 10: 1331598168 ISBN 13: 9781331598169
New Paperback Quantity Available: 10
Print on Demand
Seller:
The Book Depository
(London, United Kingdom)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Forgotten Books, United States, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.Excerpt from The Territory of Dakota: The State of North Dakota; The State of South Dakota; An Official Statistical, Historical and Political Abstract; Agricultural, Mineral, Commercial, Manufacturing, Educational, Social, and General Statements Dakota is twain. It was the largest territory in the republic, with area sufficient to give quarter-section farms each to 603,728 families. By its side large eastern stats and old world kingdoms dwarfed into mere communities. In 1870 it had only 15,000 population; in 1889 it became two states of the Federal Union, each possessing a hospitable people, cultured society, an excellent public school system with ample funds, fine buildings and good schools, churches of every denomination, a superior newspaper press, commercial facilities of a high order, railroad advantages equal to any, the conveniences of modern city life and the comforts of rural homes, situated within a short distance of markets, railroads and telegraphs, and every element and privilege of high civilization. Whatever may be said of division, there will always be much in common between North and South Dakota. Division was inevitable. The great territory contained three one-sided centres of population, widely separated and differing in social interests, products and transportation facilities. The first settlement was in the southeast, the second in the northeast and the third in the southwest; the first spread along the Missouri and Big Sioux rivers, the second along the Red River of the North, and both engaged in farming, while the third was in the Black Hills, where the principal occupation was mining. The Red river country and outlying districts, developed by the extensions of railroads from St. Paul, Minneapolis and Duluth, produce wheat; southeast Dakota added corn to the small grains produced, and had outlets on systems of railroads leading to Chicago and other distributing points. The Black Hills were long isolated, but found communication with the outside world through a system identified with southeast Dakota, and with which it will be more closely connected as soon as the opening reservation allows the laying of additional bands of steel, and thus make a united south state. These facts, together with great size of the territory, made arguments for division, which event happily hits been accomplished without friction or ill-feeling between the two new states. Any idea that there is not much in common now between the two stats is a wrong one. For a long time all sections have had the same laws, and men from every part of the territory met in conventions - political, social, benevolent, religious and educational - in legislative assembly, and there was common brotherhood. Officially there will be no more such meetings; each state will hereafter have its own conventions, meetings and elections; yet there is and always will be a strong bond of union between the two states. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. Bookseller Inventory # AAV9781331598169

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 28.78
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

4.

Frank H. Hagerty
Published by Forgotten Books (2015)
ISBN 10: 1331598168 ISBN 13: 9781331598169
New Softcover Quantity Available: 15
Print on Demand
Seller:
Rating
[?]

Book Description Forgotten Books, 2015. Book Condition: New. This item is printed on demand for shipment within 3 working days. Bookseller Inventory # LP9781331598169

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 27.63
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 3.52
From Germany to U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

5.

Frank H Hagerty
Published by Forgotten Books, United States (2015)
ISBN 10: 1331598168 ISBN 13: 9781331598169
New Paperback Quantity Available: 10
Seller:
Book Depository hard to find
(London, United Kingdom)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Forgotten Books, United States, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . This book usually ship within 10-15 business days and we will endeavor to dispatch orders quicker than this where possible. Brand New Book. Excerpt from The Territory of Dakota: The State of North Dakota; The State of South Dakota; An Official Statistical, Historical and Political Abstract; Agricultural, Mineral, Commercial, Manufacturing, Educational, Social, and General Statements Dakota is twain. It was the largest territory in the republic, with area sufficient to give quarter-section farms each to 603,728 families. By its side large eastern stats and old world kingdoms dwarfed into mere communities. In 1870 it had only 15,000 population; in 1889 it became two states of the Federal Union, each possessing a hospitable people, cultured society, an excellent public school system with ample funds, fine buildings and good schools, churches of every denomination, a superior newspaper press, commercial facilities of a high order, railroad advantages equal to any, the conveniences of modern city life and the comforts of rural homes, situated within a short distance of markets, railroads and telegraphs, and every element and privilege of high civilization. Whatever may be said of division, there will always be much in common between North and South Dakota. Division was inevitable. The great territory contained three one-sided centres of population, widely separated and differing in social interests, products and transportation facilities. The first settlement was in the southeast, the second in the northeast and the third in the southwest; the first spread along the Missouri and Big Sioux rivers, the second along the Red River of the North, and both engaged in farming, while the third was in the Black Hills, where the principal occupation was mining. The Red river country and outlying districts, developed by the extensions of railroads from St. Paul, Minneapolis and Duluth, produce wheat; southeast Dakota added corn to the small grains produced, and had outlets on systems of railroads leading to Chicago and other distributing points. The Black Hills were long isolated, but found communication with the outside world through a system identified with southeast Dakota, and with which it will be more closely connected as soon as the opening reservation allows the laying of additional bands of steel, and thus make a united south state. These facts, together with great size of the territory, made arguments for division, which event happily hits been accomplished without friction or ill-feeling between the two new states. Any idea that there is not much in common now between the two stats is a wrong one. For a long time all sections have had the same laws, and men from every part of the territory met in conventions - political, social, benevolent, religious and educational - in legislative assembly, and there was common brotherhood. Officially there will be no more such meetings; each state will hereafter have its own conventions, meetings and elections; yet there is and always will be a strong bond of union between the two states. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. Bookseller Inventory # LIE9781331598169

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 32.07
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds