Poetry and Symbolism of Indian Basketry (Classic Reprint)

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9781331701217: Poetry and Symbolism of Indian Basketry (Classic Reprint)

Excerpt from Poetry and Symbolism of Indian Basketry

The art of basket-weaving is one of the most primitive of all arts. The weaving of baskets undoubtedly ante-dated that of textiles. Holmes, Cushing, Fewkes, and other experts of the U. S. Bureau of Ethnology, have clearly shown that the basket is the mother of the pot. In other words, that the first pieces of pottery were undoubtedly the accidental discovery of aboriginal women who had lined their baskets with clay to prevent burning while parching corn and other seeds.

There is little doubt but that basket-weaving was simultaneously discovered and developed in many different lands, but in no country has it reached so high a state of development as on the Western Coast of North America. The finest baskets of the world have been made by the Pomas, the Gualalas, the Tulares, the Monos, the Shoshones, the Indians of the Kern River, and the Aleuts of Alaska.

Much of aboriginal life is revealed in a study of the uses of Indian Baskets. for to these primitive people, unacquainted with vessels made of wood, glass, iron, brass, or of any of the metals, the basket was called upon to serve practically every purpose. It was used at weddings, dances. "medicine," and other ceremonies. The baby's cradle, the mother's treasure-basket, the family mush-bowl, the jars for storing and carrying water, the basket seed-winnowers, the basket drums, the fans for striking seed into the carrying-baskets, the gambling-plaques, are but a few of the thousand and one uses to which the basket is placed.

Equally interesting would it be to watch the Indian woman as she travels on foot or horseback far afield for the gathering of her material. She knows the name, the habitat, and the life-history of every piece of material within a radius of one to two hundred miles that can be used for basketry purposes.

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This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

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George Wharton James
Published by Forgotten Books, United States (2015)
ISBN 10: 133170121X ISBN 13: 9781331701217
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Book Description Forgotten Books, United States, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. Excerpt from Poetry and Symbolism of Indian Basketry The art of basket-weaving is one of the most primitive of all arts. The weaving of baskets undoubtedly ante-dated that of textiles. Holmes, Cushing, Fewkes, and other experts of the U. S. Bureau of Ethnology, have clearly shown that the basket is the mother of the pot. In other words, that the first pieces of pottery were undoubtedly the accidental discovery of aboriginal women who had lined their baskets with clay to prevent burning while parching corn and other seeds. There is little doubt but that basket-weaving was simultaneously discovered and developed in many different lands, but in no country has it reached so high a state of development as on the Western Coast of North America. The finest baskets of the world have been made by the Pomas, the Gualalas, the Tulares, the Monos, the Shoshones, the Indians of the Kern River, and the Aleuts of Alaska. Much of aboriginal life is revealed in a study of the uses of Indian Baskets. for to these primitive people, unacquainted with vessels made of wood, glass, iron, brass, or of any of the metals, the basket was called upon to serve practically every purpose. It was used at weddings, dances. medicine, and other ceremonies. The baby s cradle, the mother s treasure-basket, the family mush-bowl, the jars for storing and carrying water, the basket seed-winnowers, the basket drums, the fans for striking seed into the carrying-baskets, the gambling-plaques, are but a few of the thousand and one uses to which the basket is placed. Equally interesting would it be to watch the Indian woman as she travels on foot or horseback far afield for the gathering of her material. She knows the name, the habitat, and the life-history of every piece of material within a radius of one to two hundred miles that can be used for basketry purposes. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. Bookseller Inventory # APC9781331701217

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George Wharton James
Published by Forgotten Books, United States (2015)
ISBN 10: 133170121X ISBN 13: 9781331701217
New Paperback Quantity Available: 10
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Book Description Forgotten Books, United States, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.Excerpt from Poetry and Symbolism of Indian Basketry The art of basket-weaving is one of the most primitive of all arts. The weaving of baskets undoubtedly ante-dated that of textiles. Holmes, Cushing, Fewkes, and other experts of the U. S. Bureau of Ethnology, have clearly shown that the basket is the mother of the pot. In other words, that the first pieces of pottery were undoubtedly the accidental discovery of aboriginal women who had lined their baskets with clay to prevent burning while parching corn and other seeds. There is little doubt but that basket-weaving was simultaneously discovered and developed in many different lands, but in no country has it reached so high a state of development as on the Western Coast of North America. The finest baskets of the world have been made by the Pomas, the Gualalas, the Tulares, the Monos, the Shoshones, the Indians of the Kern River, and the Aleuts of Alaska. Much of aboriginal life is revealed in a study of the uses of Indian Baskets. for to these primitive people, unacquainted with vessels made of wood, glass, iron, brass, or of any of the metals, the basket was called upon to serve practically every purpose. It was used at weddings, dances. medicine, and other ceremonies. The baby s cradle, the mother s treasure-basket, the family mush-bowl, the jars for storing and carrying water, the basket seed-winnowers, the basket drums, the fans for striking seed into the carrying-baskets, the gambling-plaques, are but a few of the thousand and one uses to which the basket is placed. Equally interesting would it be to watch the Indian woman as she travels on foot or horseback far afield for the gathering of her material. She knows the name, the habitat, and the life-history of every piece of material within a radius of one to two hundred miles that can be used for basketry purposes. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. Bookseller Inventory # APC9781331701217

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Book Description Forgotten Books, 2015. Book Condition: New. This item is printed on demand for shipment within 3 working days. Bookseller Inventory # LP9781331701217

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George Wharton James
Published by Forgotten Books, United States (2015)
ISBN 10: 133170121X ISBN 13: 9781331701217
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Book Description Forgotten Books, United States, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . This book usually ship within 10-15 business days and we will endeavor to dispatch orders quicker than this where possible. Brand New Book. Excerpt from Poetry and Symbolism of Indian Basketry The art of basket-weaving is one of the most primitive of all arts. The weaving of baskets undoubtedly ante-dated that of textiles. Holmes, Cushing, Fewkes, and other experts of the U. S. Bureau of Ethnology, have clearly shown that the basket is the mother of the pot. In other words, that the first pieces of pottery were undoubtedly the accidental discovery of aboriginal women who had lined their baskets with clay to prevent burning while parching corn and other seeds. There is little doubt but that basket-weaving was simultaneously discovered and developed in many different lands, but in no country has it reached so high a state of development as on the Western Coast of North America. The finest baskets of the world have been made by the Pomas, the Gualalas, the Tulares, the Monos, the Shoshones, the Indians of the Kern River, and the Aleuts of Alaska. Much of aboriginal life is revealed in a study of the uses of Indian Baskets. for to these primitive people, unacquainted with vessels made of wood, glass, iron, brass, or of any of the metals, the basket was called upon to serve practically every purpose. It was used at weddings, dances. medicine, and other ceremonies. The baby s cradle, the mother s treasure-basket, the family mush-bowl, the jars for storing and carrying water, the basket seed-winnowers, the basket drums, the fans for striking seed into the carrying-baskets, the gambling-plaques, are but a few of the thousand and one uses to which the basket is placed. Equally interesting would it be to watch the Indian woman as she travels on foot or horseback far afield for the gathering of her material. She knows the name, the habitat, and the life-history of every piece of material within a radius of one to two hundred miles that can be used for basketry purposes. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. Bookseller Inventory # LIE9781331701217

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