Network Wiretapping Capabilities: Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Telecommunications and Finance of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of ... Session, September 13, 1994 (Classic Reprint)

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9781332271566: Network Wiretapping Capabilities: Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Telecommunications and Finance of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of ... Session, September 13, 1994 (Classic Reprint)

Excerpt from Network Wiretapping Capabilities: Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Telecommunications and Finance of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, September 13, 1994

Then, in 1967, the Supreme Court finally adopted Justice Brandeis dissenting view, overruled Olmstead, and held that an eavesdropping does amount to a "search or seizure" and thus was protected by the Constitution.

Just 1 year later, Congress again responded by passing the 1968 Wiretap Act. This law makes wiretaps lawful by setting up a judicial process that law enforcement must go through to get a court-ordered wiretap.

But the story does not end there. Congress again responded to changes in computer and in communications technology by passing the "Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986." This law, which was sponsored by Senator Leahy and Congressman Edwards, amended the 1968 Wiretap Act by protecting a new class of electronic communications, defined broadly to include everything from e-mail to databases. That legislation reflected an ongoing effort to update and clarify Federal wiretap laws, as the Senate committee put it, "in light of dramatic changes in new computer and telecommunications technologies."

Well, today we are back at the task of updating and clarifying our wiretap law again. This time, the changes in computer and telecommunications technology are not just dramatic; they are overwhelming. The growth of digital communications over the past 8 years, the spread of fiber deeper into the local phone network, the spread and growth of wireless services - all of these developments converge to set the stage for today's hearing.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation says that as these advanced technologies get deployed, that the technology should not, in essence, repeal or modify the 1968 Wiretap Act. Instead, the Bureau argues we must update and clarify our laws so that their ability to conduct wiretaps is maintained - not expanded and not diminished - just maintained.

Therefore, as I see it, the challenge before the subcommittee is to listen to the FBI and to local law enforcement, who are on the front lines battling crime; and then to listen to the telecommunications industry, which is in the forefront of trying to develop new telecommunications equipment and services. And then to try to reconcile these views, working with the Judiciary Committee, to come up with a policy that, one, protects the privacy interests of our citizens; two, is mindful of the limited financial resources of taxpayers or ratepayers; three, meets the legitimate needs of law enforcement; and four, does not unduly interfere with our telecommunications industry, which is racing to the future with advances in communications technology.

I think the bill introduced by Congressmen Edwards and Hyde represents great progress in meeting these criteria, and they and their staffs should be commended for the substantial effort it took to make that progress. But clearly more work needs to be done.

I look forward to the hearing, as I am sure all the rest of the members do, so that we can assist in clarifying and crafting a workable solution to this genuine problem.

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Book Description Forgotten Books, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. Excerpt from Network Wiretapping Capabilities: Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Telecommunications and Finance of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, September 13, 1994 Then, in 1967, the Supreme Court finally adopted Justice Brandeis dissenting view, overruled Olmstead, and held that an eavesdropping does amount to a search or seizure and thus was protected by the Constitution. Just 1 year later, Congress again responded by passing the 1968 Wiretap Act. This law makes wiretaps lawful by setting up a judicial process that law enforcement must go through to get a court-ordered wiretap. But the story does not end there. Congress again responded to changes in computer and in communications technology by passing the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986. This law, which was sponsored by Senator Leahy and Congressman Edwards, amended the 1968 Wiretap Act by protecting a new class of electronic communications, defined broadly to include everything from e-mail to databases. That legislation reflected an ongoing effort to update and clarify Federal wiretap laws, as the Senate committee put it, in light of dramatic changes in new computer and telecommunications technologies. Well, today we are back at the task of updating and clarifying our wiretap law again. This time, the changes in computer and telecommunications technology are not just dramatic; they are overwhelming. The growth of digital communications over the past 8 years, the spread of fiber deeper into the local phone network, the spread and growth of wireless services - all of these developments converge to set the stage for today s hearing. The Federal Bureau of Investigation says that as these advanced technologies get deployed, that the technology should not, in essence, repeal or modify the 1968 Wiretap Act. Instead, the Bureau argues we must update and clarify our laws so that their ability to conduct wiretaps is maintained - not expanded and not diminished - just maintained. Therefore, as I see it, the challenge before the subcommittee is to listen to the FBI and to local law enforcement, who are on the front lines battling crime; and then to listen to the telecommunications industry, which is in the forefront of trying to develop new telecommunications equipment and services. And then to try to reconcile these views, working with the Judiciary Committee, to come up with a policy that, one, protects the privacy interests of our citizens; two, is mindful of the limited financial resources of taxpayers or ratepayers; three, meets the legitimate needs of law enforcement; and four, does not unduly interfere with our telecommunications industry, which is racing to the future with advances in communications technology. I think the bill introduced by Congressmen Edwards and Hyde represents great progress in meeting these criteria, and they and their staffs should be commended for the substantial effort it took to make that progress. But clearly more work needs to be done. I look forward to the hearing, as I am sure all the rest of the members do, so that we can assist in clarifying and crafting a workable solution to this genuine problem. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at. Bookseller Inventory # APC9781332271566

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Book Description Forgotten Books, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.Excerpt from Network Wiretapping Capabilities: Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Telecommunications and Finance of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, September 13, 1994 Then, in 1967, the Supreme Court finally adopted Justice Brandeis dissenting view, overruled Olmstead, and held that an eavesdropping does amount to a search or seizure and thus was protected by the Constitution. Just 1 year later, Congress again responded by passing the 1968 Wiretap Act. This law makes wiretaps lawful by setting up a judicial process that law enforcement must go through to get a court-ordered wiretap. But the story does not end there. Congress again responded to changes in computer and in communications technology by passing the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986. This law, which was sponsored by Senator Leahy and Congressman Edwards, amended the 1968 Wiretap Act by protecting a new class of electronic communications, defined broadly to include everything from e-mail to databases. That legislation reflected an ongoing effort to update and clarify Federal wiretap laws, as the Senate committee put it, in light of dramatic changes in new computer and telecommunications technologies. Well, today we are back at the task of updating and clarifying our wiretap law again. This time, the changes in computer and telecommunications technology are not just dramatic; they are overwhelming. The growth of digital communications over the past 8 years, the spread of fiber deeper into the local phone network, the spread and growth of wireless services - all of these developments converge to set the stage for today s hearing. The Federal Bureau of Investigation says that as these advanced technologies get deployed, that the technology should not, in essence, repeal or modify the 1968 Wiretap Act. Instead, the Bureau argues we must update and clarify our laws so that their ability to conduct wiretaps is maintained - not expanded and not diminished - just maintained. Therefore, as I see it, the challenge before the subcommittee is to listen to the FBI and to local law enforcement, who are on the front lines battling crime; and then to listen to the telecommunications industry, which is in the forefront of trying to develop new telecommunications equipment and services. And then to try to reconcile these views, working with the Judiciary Committee, to come up with a policy that, one, protects the privacy interests of our citizens; two, is mindful of the limited financial resources of taxpayers or ratepayers; three, meets the legitimate needs of law enforcement; and four, does not unduly interfere with our telecommunications industry, which is racing to the future with advances in communications technology. I think the bill introduced by Congressmen Edwards and Hyde represents great progress in meeting these criteria, and they and their staffs should be commended for the substantial effort it took to make that progress. But clearly more work needs to be done. I look forward to the hearing, as I am sure all the rest of the members do, so that we can assist in clarifying and crafting a workable solution to this genuine problem. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at. Bookseller Inventory # APC9781332271566

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Book Description Forgotten Books, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . This book usually ship within 10-15 business days and we will endeavor to dispatch orders quicker than this where possible. Brand New Book. Excerpt from Network Wiretapping Capabilities: Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Telecommunications and Finance of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, September 13, 1994 Then, in 1967, the Supreme Court finally adopted Justice Brandeis dissenting view, overruled Olmstead, and held that an eavesdropping does amount to a search or seizure and thus was protected by the Constitution. Just 1 year later, Congress again responded by passing the 1968 Wiretap Act. This law makes wiretaps lawful by setting up a judicial process that law enforcement must go through to get a court-ordered wiretap. But the story does not end there. Congress again responded to changes in computer and in communications technology by passing the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986. This law, which was sponsored by Senator Leahy and Congressman Edwards, amended the 1968 Wiretap Act by protecting a new class of electronic communications, defined broadly to include everything from e-mail to databases. That legislation reflected an ongoing effort to update and clarify Federal wiretap laws, as the Senate committee put it, in light of dramatic changes in new computer and telecommunications technologies. Well, today we are back at the task of updating and clarifying our wiretap law again. This time, the changes in computer and telecommunications technology are not just dramatic; they are overwhelming. The growth of digital communications over the past 8 years, the spread of fiber deeper into the local phone network, the spread and growth of wireless services - all of these developments converge to set the stage for today s hearing. The Federal Bureau of Investigation says that as these advanced technologies get deployed, that the technology should not, in essence, repeal or modify the 1968 Wiretap Act. Instead, the Bureau argues we must update and clarify our laws so that their ability to conduct wiretaps is maintained - not expanded and not diminished - just maintained. Therefore, as I see it, the challenge before the subcommittee is to listen to the FBI and to local law enforcement, who are on the front lines battling crime; and then to listen to the telecommunications industry, which is in the forefront of trying to develop new telecommunications equipment and services. And then to try to reconcile these views, working with the Judiciary Committee, to come up with a policy that, one, protects the privacy interests of our citizens; two, is mindful of the limited financial resources of taxpayers or ratepayers; three, meets the legitimate needs of law enforcement; and four, does not unduly interfere with our telecommunications industry, which is racing to the future with advances in communications technology. I think the bill introduced by Congressmen Edwards and Hyde represents great progress in meeting these criteria, and they and their staffs should be commended for the substantial effort it took to make that progress. But clearly more work needs to be done. I look forward to the hearing, as I am sure all the rest of the members do, so that we can assist in clarifying and crafting a workable solution to this genuine problem. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at. Bookseller Inventory # LIE9781332271566

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