The Playskool Guide for Expectant Fathers: The Best Information, Action Plans and Expert Advice for Your New Adventures in Daddyhood

3 avg rating
( 11 ratings by Goodreads )
 
9781402209345: The Playskool Guide for Expectant Fathers: The Best Information, Action Plans and Expert Advice for Your New Adventures in Daddyhood

The information-packed guide to the most exciting time of your life.

The Playskool Guide for Expectant Fathers gives dads-to-be all the advice and information they need to understand what's happening during every step of pregnancy. Written by M.D. and father of three Brian Lipps, dads will learn how to get involved in ways that give them a close and incredible experience while helping mom toward the big day .

-Great starting points for many pregnancy-related conversations
-Learn about your baby's development month-by-month
-How to support, encourage and help your pregnant partner
-Develop an action plan of things to do to get ready for baby
-Understand mom's changing body and hormones
-Get involved by reading-and talking-to the bump in the belly
-And much more

From communicating with mommy to planning for the future, The Playskool Guide for Expectant Fathers is dad's essential resource to prepare for his new adventures in daddyhood.

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

About the Author:

Brian Lipps, M.D. is the proud father of three young boys and knows firsthand the types of problems that expecting and new fathers face, particularly those related to feeding, sleeping and the health of the baby. His medical training has been particularly valuable when dealing with health, safety and developmental issues including common illnesses and recognizing important cognitive, motor, emotional, language and personality milestones. Dr. Lipps lives in Norfolk, VA.

Excerpt. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.:

Excerpt from Chapter 1:

The Importance of Genetics
Most people recognize that having a baby is a wonderful and miraculous event; however, not everyone realizes what a complicated process it is. Through a series of events, the genetic information of two people, in this case you and your partner, is combined to make a new mix of the two-your baby.

Although the process works well in the vast majority of cases, sometimes it doesn't, and it can lead to genetic diseases or birth defects. Realizing that something can go wrong often leads to anxiety and fear during a pregnancy. In order to better understand the risk, as well as what can be done to prevent or diagnose genetic problems or birth defects, it is important to have a basic understanding of genetics. This means knowing where our genetic information can be found and how we pass it on to our children.

Passing on Our Genes
All of our genetic information is contained in series of molecules called deoxyribonucleic acids, or DNA. Groupings of DNA that have a single purpose, such as the creation or control of something, are called genes. Each gene usually has two copies-one from the father and one from the mother.

Genes are packaged into large structures called chromosomes. We inherit a set of 23 chromosomes from each of our parents, so we have a total of 46 chromosomes. Each chromosome in a pair looks similar, but on the level of the individual genes, they can differ significantly.

Two of our 46 chromosomes are called sex chromosomes because they determine what sex we are. Males have both an X chromosome and a Y chromosome (XY), whereas females have two X chromosomes (XX). Because women can only pass on an X chromosome, the baby's sex is determined by whether the man passes on his X or his Y chromosome.

When Your Baby Was Conceived
After your sperm met up with your partner's egg, something amazing happened. One of your sperm burrowed into the center of the egg and triggered a chemical reaction that made its outer shell become impenetrable to the other sperm. Your chromosomes were then released and combined with your partner's chromosomes. When this happened, your sperm fertilized her egg and it became an embryo. Over the next nine months, that embryo goes through a very complex but orderly process to become your baby.

The key to tracking your baby's progress during the pregnancy will be knowing the baby's gestational age and understanding the chronology of a normal pregnancy. There are three systems used to track a baby's progress during pregnancy: The first is based on weeks, the second is based on months, and the third is based on trimesters. All three systems are used extensively in books and on websites on prenatal care; this book will use trimesters here and months in Part Three.

The First Trimester
The first trimester of pregnancy started with the first day of mom's last menstrual period and will end after the third month, or week 13. It is a critical period of development when most of the baby's organs and structure are forming. The baby will be particularly susceptible to birth defects at this time. By the end of the first trimester, most of the baby's core structures will have formed and the baby looks human.

At first mom probably didn't realize that she was pregnant. A few weeks after the fertilization she may have begun to suspect, when she missed her period or was starting to have some unusual symptoms, such as nausea, fatigue, or going to the bathroom more often than usual. She probably confirmed her suspicions with a home pregnancy test.
Every month, the inner lining of her uterus enlarges in preparation for a fertilized egg. If one isn't available, this layer is shed approximately two weeks after ovulation-a process called menstruation. In order for the fertilized egg to be able to grow into a baby, menstruation has to stop. Hormones released by the fertilized egg, and then later the placenta, will stop her menstrual cycle and cause her to miss her period.
Although the baby is not very large during this first trimester (less than one ounce), the hormonal changes of pregnancy are going to have a profound effect on mom. In addition to the fatigue and morning sickness she might be feeling, she will likely experience frequent changes in her mood and emotions.

The Second Trimester
The second trimester will start in the fourth month, or week 14, and will end after the sixth month, or week 26. During this period the baby will be called a fetus and be recognizable as human. Most of the main body structures are going to be formed at this time, and the placenta will start providing nourishment to the baby. Although the sexual organs, spine, fingers, toes, and some other body parts will still be forming, the emphasis will be primarily on growth.

During this time the baby will start to collect a lot of fat under the skin, which will be important for keeping warm and providing energy later on. However, it will be awhile before the baby is pudgy! The baby will also start to suck its thumb, practice breathing and swallowing, and make urine. By the end of the second trimester, the baby's weight will have gone from just under one ounce to nearly two-and-a-half pounds!

Most mothers start to feel better at this stage because the physical symptoms of pregnancy have begun to improve. In fact, many women consider the second trimester to be the best part of pregnancy.

Sometime past week 16, or the fourth month, the baby's movements are going to become more obvious. This will be a very exciting time for mom. By the fifth month (week 20), the baby's sex will be identifiable by ultrasound, and it will become obvious to others that mom is pregnant. Mom will also be starting to wear maternity clothes.

By the end of second trimester, or sixth month, your baby will likely be over 2 pounds, and mom will have gained 20 pounds-and there are still another three months to go!

"About this title" may belong to another edition of this title.

Top Search Results from the AbeBooks Marketplace

1.

Brian Lipps
ISBN 10: 1402209347 ISBN 13: 9781402209345
New Paperback First Edition Quantity Available: 1
Seller
Grand Eagle Retail
(Wilmington, DE, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description 2007. Paperback. Book Condition: New. 1st. Paperback. The information-packed guide to the most exciting time of your life.The Playskool Guide for Expectant Fathers gives dads-to-be all the advice and information they need to understand what&#.Shipping may be from multiple locations in the US or from the UK, depending on stock availability. 291 pages. 0.485. Bookseller Inventory # 9781402209345

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 19.47
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

2.

Lipps, Brian
Published by Sourcebooks (2007)
ISBN 10: 1402209347 ISBN 13: 9781402209345
New Paperback Quantity Available: 2
Seller
Murray Media
(North Miami Beach, FL, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Sourcebooks, 2007. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Bookseller Inventory # P111402209347

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 33.37
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 1.99
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

3.

Brian Lipps
ISBN 10: 1402209347 ISBN 13: 9781402209345
New Paperback First Edition Quantity Available: 1
Seller
AussieBookSeller
(SILVERWATER, NSW, Australia)
Rating
[?]

Book Description 2007. Paperback. Book Condition: New. 1st. Paperback. The information-packed guide to the most exciting time of your life.The Playskool Guide for Expectant Fathers gives dads-to-be all the advice and information they need to unde.Shipping may be from our Sydney, NSW warehouse or from our UK or US warehouse, depending on stock availability. 291 pages. 0.485. Bookseller Inventory # 9781402209345

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 12.28
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 37.00
From Australia to U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds