The Glass Rainbow

ISBN 13: 9781408488188

The Glass Rainbow

4.21 avg rating
( 9,537 ratings by Goodreads )
 
9781408488188: The Glass Rainbow
View all copies of this ISBN edition:
 
 

James Lee Burke’s eagerly awaited new novel finds Detective Dave Robicheaux back in New Iberia, Louisiana, and embroiled in the most harrowing and dangerous case of his career. Seven young women in neighboring Jefferson Davis Parish have been brutally murdered. While the crimes have all the telltale signs of a serial killer, the death of Bernadette Latiolais, a high school honor student, doesn’t fit: she is not the kind of hapless and marginalized victim psychopaths usually prey upon. Robicheaux and his best friend, Clete Purcel, confront Herman Stanga, a notorious pimp and crack dealer whom both men despise. When Stanga turns up dead shortly after a fierce beating by Purcel, in front of numerous witnesses, the case takes a nasty turn, and Clete’s career and life are hanging by threads over the abyss.

Adding to Robicheaux’s troubles is the matter of his daughter, Alafair, on leave from Stanford Law to put the finishing touches on her novel. Her literary pursuit has led her into the arms of Kermit Abelard, celebrated novelist and scion of a once prominent Louisiana family whose fortunes are slowly sinking into the corruption of Louisiana’s subculture. Abelard’s association with bestselling ex-convict author Robert Weingart, a man who uses and discards people like Kleenex, causes Robicheaux to fear that Alafair might be destroyed by the man she loves. As his daughter seems to drift away from him, he wonders if he has become a victim of his own paranoia. But as usual, Robicheaux’s instincts are proven correct and he finds himself dealing with a level of evil that is greater than any enemy he has confronted in the past.

Set against the backdrop of an Edenic paradise threatened by pernicious forces, James Lee Burke’s The Glass Rainbow is already being hailed as perhaps the best novel in the Robicheaux series.

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

About the Author:

James Lee Burke, a rare winner of two Edgar Awards, and named Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America, is the author of thirty-one previous novels and two collections of short stories, including such New York Times bestsellers as The Glass RainbowSwan Peak, The Tin Roof Blowdown, Last Car to Elysian Fields, and Rain Gods. He lives in Missoula, Montana.

Excerpt. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.:

CHAPTER
1

THE ROOM I had rented in an old part of Natchez seemed more reflective of New Orleans than a river town in Mississippi. The ventilated storm shutters were slatted with a pink glow, as soft and filtered and cool in color as the spring sunrise can be in the Garden District, the courtyard outside touched with mist off the river, the pastel walls deep in shadow and stained with lichen above the flower beds, the brick walkways smelling of damp stone and the wild spearmint that grew in green clusters between the bricks. I could see the shadows of banana trees moving on the window screens, the humidity condensing and threading along the fronds like veins in living tissue. I could hear a ship’s horn blowing somewhere out on the river, a long hooting sound that was absorbed and muted inside the mist, thwarting its own purpose. A wood-bladed fan revolved slowly above my bed, the incandescence of the lightbulbs attached to it reduced to a dim yellow smudge inside frosted-glass shades that were fluted to resemble flowers. The wood floor and the garish wallpaper and the rain spots on the ceiling belonged to another era, one that was outside of time and unheedful of the demands of commerce. Perhaps as a reminder of that fact, the only clock in the room was a round windup mechanism that possessed neither a glass cover nor hands on its face.

There are moments in the Deep South when one wonders if he has not wakened to a sunrise in the spring of 1862. And in that moment, maybe one realizes with a guilty pang that he would not find such an event entirely unwelcome.

At midmorning, inside a pine-wooded depression not far from the Mississippi, I found the man I was looking for. His name was Jimmy Darl Thigpin, and the diminutive or boylike image his name suggested, as with many southern names, was egregiously misleading. He was a gunbull of the old school, the kind of man who was neither good nor bad, in the way that a firearm is neither good nor bad. He was the kind of man whom you treat with discretion and whose private frame of reference you do not probe. In some ways, Jimmy Darl Thigpin was the lawman all of us fear we might one day become.

He sat atop a quarter horse that was at least sixteen hands high, his back erect, a cut-down double-barrel twelve-gauge propped on his thigh, the saddle creaking under his weight. He wore a long-sleeved cotton shirt to protect his arms from mosquitoes, and a beat-up, tall-crown cowboy hat in the apparent belief that he could prevent a return of the skin cancer that had shriveled one side of his face. To my knowledge, in various stages of his forty-year career, he had killed five men, some inside the prison system, some outside, one in an argument over a woman in a bar.

His charges were all black men, each wearing big-stripe green-and-white convict jumpers and baggy pants, some wearing leather-cuffed ankle restraints. They were felling trees, chopping off the limbs for burning, stacking the trunks on a flatbed truck, the heat from the fire so intense it gave off no smoke.

When he saw me park on the road, he dismounted and broke open the breech of his shotgun, cradling it over his left forearm, exposing the two shells in the chambers, effectively disarming his weapon. But in spite of his show of deference for my safety, there was no pleasure in his expression when he shook hands, and his eyes never left his charges.

“We appreciate your calling us, Cap,” I said. “It looks like you’re still running a tight ship.”

Then I thought about what I had just said. There are instances when the exigencies of your life or profession require that you ingratiate yourself with people who make you uncomfortable, not because of what they are but because you fear their approval and the possibility you are more like them than you are willing to accept. I kept believing that age would one day free me of that burden. But it never has.

My introspection was of no relevance. He seemed uncertain about the purpose of my visit to Mississippi, even though it was he who had contacted me about one of his charges. “This is about those hookers that was killed over in your area?” he asked.

“I wouldn’t necessarily call them that.”

“You’re right, I shouldn’t be speaking unkindly of the dead. The boy I was telling you about is over yonder. The one with the gold teeth.”

“Thanks for your help, Cap.”

Maybe my friend the gunbull wasn’t all bad, I told myself. But sometimes when you think you’re almost home free, that indeed redemption is working incrementally in all of us, you find you have set yourself up for another disappointment.

“His nickname is Git-It-and-Go,” Thigpin said.

“Sir?”

“Don’t be feeling sorry for him. He could steal the stink off shit and not get the smell on his hands. If he don’t give you what you want, let me know and I’ll slap a knot on his head.”

Jimmy Darl Thigpin opened a pouch of string tobacco and filled his jaw with it. He chewed slowly, his eyes hazy with a private thought or perhaps the pleasure the tobacco gave him. Then he realized I was watching him, and he grinned at the corner of his mouth to indicate he and I were members of the same club.

The convict’s name was Elmore Latiolais. He came from a rural slum sixty miles northeast of New Iberia, where I was employed as a detective with the Iberia Parish Sheriff’s Department. His facial features were Negroid, but his skin was the color of paste, covered with large moles as thick and irregular in shape as drops of mud, his wiry hair peroxided a bright gold. He was one of those recidivists whose lives are a testimony to institutional failure and the fact that for some people and situations there are no solutions.

We sat on a log in the shade, thirty yards from where his crew was working. The air was breathless and superheated inside the clearing, the trash fire red-hot at the center, the freshly cut pine limbs snapping instantly alight when they hit the flames. Elmore Latiolais was sweating heavily, his body wrapped in an odor that was like mildew and soapy water that had dried in his clothes.

“Why we got to talk here, man?” he said.

“I’m sorry I didn’t bring an air-conditioned office with me,” I replied.

“They gonna make me for a snitch.”

“I drove a long way to talk with you, podna. Would you rather I leave?”

His eyes searched in space, his alternatives, his agenda, the pitiful issues of his life probably swimming like dots in the heat waves warping off the fire.

“My sister was Bernadette, one of them seven girls that’s been killed, that don’t nobody care about,” he said.

“Captain Thigpin explained that.”

“My grandmother sent me the news article. It was from November of last year. My grandmother says ain’t nothing been written about them since. The article says my sister and all them others was prostitutes.”

“Not exactly. But yeah, the article suggests that. What are you trying to tell me?”

“It ain’t fair.”

“Not fair?”

“That’s right. Calling my sister a prostitute. Nobody interested in the troot. All them girls just t’rown away like they was sacks of garbage.” He wiped his nose with the heel of his hand.

“You know who’s behind their deaths?”

“Herman Stanga.”

“What do you base that on?”

“Herman Stanga tried to have me jooged when I was in Angola.”

“Herman Stanga is a pimp.”

“That’s right.”

“You’re telling me a pimp is mixed up with your sister’s death but your sister was not a prostitute? Does that seem like a reasonable conclusion to you?”

He turned his face to mine. “Where you been, man?”

I propped my hands on my knees, stiffening my arms, my expression blank, waiting for the balloon of anger in my chest to pass. “You asked Captain Thigpin to call me. Why me and not somebody else?”

“My cousin tole me you was axing around about the girls. But I t’ink you got your head stuffed up your hole.”

“Forgive me if I’m losing patience with this conversation.”

“There’s no money in selling cooze no more. Herman Stanga is into meth. You got to come to Mis’sippi and interview somebody on a road gang to find that out?”

I stood up, my gaze focused on neutral space. “I have several photographs here I’d like you to look at. Tell me if you know any of these women.”

There were seven photos in my shirt pocket. I removed only six of them. He remained seated on the log and went through them one by one. None of the photos was a mug shot. They had been taken by friends or family members using cheap cameras and one-hour development services. The backdrops were in poor neighborhoods where the residents parked their cars in the yards and the litter in the rain ditches disappeared inside the weeds during the summer and was exposed again during the winter. Two of the victims were white, four were black. Some of them were pretty. All of them were young. None of them looked unhappy. None of them probably had any idea of the fate that awaited them.

“They all lived sout’ of the tracks, didn’t they?” he said.

“That’s right. Do you recognize them?”

“No, I ain’t seen none of them. You ain’t shown me my sister’s picture.”

I removed the seventh photo from my pocket and handed it to him. The girl in it had been seventeen when she died. She was last seen leaving a dollar store at four o’clock in the afternoon. She had a sweet, round face and was smiling in the photograph.

Elmore Latiolais cupped the photo in his palm. He stared at it for a long time, then shielded his eyes as though avoiding the sun’s glare. “Can I keep it?” h...

"About this title" may belong to another edition of this title.

Buy Used
Condition: Good
Ex Library Book with usual stamps... Learn more about this copy

Shipping: US$ 10.29
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.

Destination, rates & speeds

Add to Basket

Other Popular Editions of the Same Title

9781439128312: The Glass Rainbow: A Dave Robicheaux Novel

Featured Edition

ISBN 10:  1439128316 ISBN 13:  9781439128312
Publisher: Pocket Star, 2011
Softcover

9780753828090: Glass Rainbow

Phoenix, 2011
Softcover

9781439128299: The Glass Rainbow: A Dave Robicheaux Novel

Simon ..., 2010
Hardcover

9781982100261: The Glass Rainbow: A Dave Robicheaux Novel

Simon ..., 2018
Softcover

9781409116615: The Glass Rainbow

Orion, 2010
Hardcover

Top Search Results from the AbeBooks Marketplace

1.

Burke, James Lee
Published by Windsor (2011)
ISBN 10: 1408488183 ISBN 13: 9781408488188
Used Hardcover Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
WeBuyBooks
(Rossendale, LANCS, United Kingdom)

Book Description Windsor, 2011. Hardcover. Condition: Good. Ex Library Book with usual stamps and stickers. Good condition is defined as: a copy that has been read but remains in clean condition. All of the pages are intact and the cover is intact and the spine may show signs of wear. The book may have minor markings which are not specifically mentioned. Most items will be dispatched the same or the next working day. Seller Inventory # mon0011219726

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy Used
US$ 1.39
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 10.29
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

2.

James Lee Burke
Published by Windsor (2011)
ISBN 10: 1408488183 ISBN 13: 9781408488188
Used Hardcover Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
MusicMagpie
(Stockport, United Kingdom)

Book Description Windsor, 2011. Condition: Very Good. Seller Inventory # U9781408488188

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy Used
US$ 4.96
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 6.80
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

3.

James Lee Burke
Published by Windsor (2011)
ISBN 10: 1408488183 ISBN 13: 9781408488188
Used Hardcover Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
Anybook Ltd.
(Lincoln, United Kingdom)

Book Description Windsor, 2011. Condition: Good. This is an ex-library book and may have the usual library/used-book markings inside. Large print edition.This book has hardback covers. In good all round condition. No dust jacket. Please note the Image in this listing is a stock photo and may not match the covers of the actual item,1000grams, ISBN:9781408488188. Seller Inventory # 4081787

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy Used
US$ 3.69
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 8.29
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

4.

Burke, James Lee
Published by Windsor
ISBN 10: 1408488183 ISBN 13: 9781408488188
Used Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
Phatpocket Limited
(Waltham Abbey, HERTS, United Kingdom)

Book Description Windsor. Condition: Acceptable. Used - Acceptable. Ex-library with wear and barcode page may have been removed. Seller Inventory # Z1-S-008-02442

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy Used
US$ 4.15
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 13.19
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

5.

Burke, J L
Published by Paragon (2010)
ISBN 10: 1408488183 ISBN 13: 9781408488188
Used Softcover Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
Anybook Ltd.
(Lincoln, United Kingdom)

Book Description Paragon, 2010. Condition: Good. This is an ex-library book and may have the usual library/used-book markings inside.This book has soft covers. In good all round condition. Please note the Image in this listing is a stock photo and may not match the covers of the actual item,850grams, ISBN:9781408488188. Seller Inventory # 7446154

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy Used
US$ 14.35
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 8.29
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

6.

Burke, James Lee
ISBN 10: 1408488183 ISBN 13: 9781408488188
Used Hardcover Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
WorldofBooks
(Goring-By-Sea, WS, United Kingdom)

Book Description Hardback. Condition: Good. The book has been read but remains in clean condition. All pages are intact and the cover is intact. Some minor wear to the spine. Seller Inventory # GOR006157235

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy Used
US$ 8.86
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 24.77
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

7.

Burke, James Lee
ISBN 10: 1408488183 ISBN 13: 9781408488188
Used Hardcover Quantity Available: 3
Seller:
WorldofBooks
(Goring-By-Sea, WS, United Kingdom)

Book Description Hardback. Condition: Very Good. The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged. Seller Inventory # GOR005199949

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy Used
US$ 8.86
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 24.77
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds