Travis E. Breeding Social Rules of Facebook

ISBN 13: 9781493660360

Social Rules of Facebook

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9781493660360: Social Rules of Facebook

Since graduating high school in 2004, I have seen many changes in the world. No changes have occurred more rapidly than those in the area of technology. When I walked across the stage to receive my diploma, Facebook did not exist. It was only a few years earlier when the use of cell phones became widespread. In 2004, text messaging wasn’t very popular. When I think of how much technology has changed the lives of people all around the world in the past ten years I think about how it’s also changed the lives of people with autism and other disabilities. This technology boom has been a positive thing for the autism community by creating more platforms and avenues to improve communications for people who struggle with this issue. Being able to text message someone instead of picking up a phone, dialing their number, and actually talking to them on the phone is a lot easier. It’s a lot less stressful than a phone conversation. Texting is an easier form of communication for me. When you are talking to someone in person the response needed to keep the communication and conversation flowing is an immediate one. In texting, I can take a moment to think through what I want to say. The same can be said for Facebook and email. It’s a form of communication that can be beneficial for people with autism. However, I don’t want to be a person with autism who hides behind this form of communication. Along with the many pros there are to the online form of communication and texting there are also many cons and sometimes the cons far outweigh the pros. When teaching people with autism to use Facebook, texting, or any type of online communication it is important to teach them how to use this technology appropriately. Again, it amazes me how neurotypicals, or people not on the autism spectrum, just automatically seem to know and understand how to use Facebook. It’s a new technology that came into their lives and they just picked it up and seemingly, with little effort, figured out how to use it. Someone with autism is not going to get this. One of the more frustrating things for me is that I always take things literally. When chatting with someone on Facebook there is a chat box on the right side of the screen. In the chat box the names of your friends who appear to be online and able to chat are there with a “green dot” next to the name. Because Facebook has shown me with the use of a “green dot” that these people are ready to chat I think it’s appropriate to send them a message in the chat. “Hey, what’s up?” or “Hi, how are you?” I am often left confused because the individual I sent the message to either doesn’t reply or, it takes them a half hour to do so. I am confused because the “green dot” indicated that these people were online and ready to chat with me. Because I get no response I assume the person doesn’t like me or doesn’t want to talk to me. This causes me to develop negative feelings about myself. I start asking myself why my friend didn’t want to talk to me. What did I do wrong? I now know, because of the things I have learned that this isn’t the case. But if we don’t educate children and teens, especially those on the autism spectrum, about this as they are growing up and learning how to use Facebook and online communication it can cause them to have huge issues with self-esteem. Facebook has a new feature. It lets you know when your friend sees the message you sent. Now, if you’re chatting or if you send your friend a Facebook message a little check mark with the words “seen” pops up when your friend sees your message. This book goes into detail about a lot of the unwritten rules used to socialize on Facebook.

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About the Author:

Travis Breeding is the author of over 25 books. He writes in all different genres. He has several non-fiction books about Autism and Schizophrenia. He also writes some fiction for his fans. Travis is 28 years old. He was diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome at the age of 22. Travis hopes to shed light on autism and help others understand what life with the syndrome is all about. Most of all he hopes that others understand that people with Autism are human beings worth being loved just like all other people in the world. You can visit Travis' website at http://travisbreeding.weebly.com to learn more about him.

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Breeding, Travis E.
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Book Description Createspace, United States, 2013. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. Since graduating high school in 2004, I have seen many changes in the world. No changes have occurred more rapidly than those in the area of technology. When I walked across the stage to receive my diploma, Facebook did not exist. It was only a few years earlier when the use of cell phones became widespread. In 2004, text messaging wasn t very popular. When I think of how much technology has changed the lives of people all around the world in the past ten years I think about how it s also changed the lives of people with autism and other disabilities. This technology boom has been a positive thing for the autism community by creating more platforms and avenues to improve communications for people who struggle with this issue. Being able to text message someone instead of picking up a phone, dialing their number, and actually talking to them on the phone is a lot easier. It s a lot less stressful than a phone conversation. Texting is an easier form of communication for me. When you are talking to someone in person the response needed to keep the communication and conversation flowing is an immediate one. In texting, I can take a moment to think through what I want to say. The same can be said for Facebook and email. It s a form of communication that can be beneficial for people with autism. However, I don t want to be a person with autism who hides behind this form of communication. Along with the many pros there are to the online form of communication and texting there are also many cons and sometimes the cons far outweigh the pros. When teaching people with autism to use Facebook, texting, or any type of online communication it is important to teach them how to use this technology appropriately. Again, it amazes me how neurotypicals, or people not on the autism spectrum, just automatically seem to know and understand how to use Facebook. It s a new technology that came into their lives and they just picked it up and seemingly, with little effort, figured out how to use it. Someone with autism is not going to get this. One of the more frustrating things for me is that I always take things literally. When chatting with someone on Facebook there is a chat box on the right side of the screen. In the chat box the names of your friends who appear to be online and able to chat are there with a green dot next to the name. Because Facebook has shown me with the use of a green dot that these people are ready to chat I think it s appropriate to send them a message in the chat. Hey, what s up? or Hi, how are you? I am often left confused because the individual I sent the message to either doesn t reply or, it takes them a half hour to do so. I am confused because the green dot indicated that these people were online and ready to chat with me. Because I get no response I assume the person doesn t like me or doesn t want to talk to me. This causes me to develop negative feelings about myself. I start asking myself why my friend didn t want to talk to me. What did I do wrong? I now know, because of the things I have learned that this isn t the case. But if we don t educate children and teens, especially those on the autism spectrum, about this as they are growing up and learning how to use Facebook and online communication it can cause them to have huge issues with self-esteem. Facebook has a new feature. It lets you know when your friend sees the message you sent. Now, if you re chatting or if you send your friend a Facebook message a little check mark with the words seen pops up when your friend sees your message. This book goes into detail about a lot of the unwritten rules used to socialize on Facebook. Bookseller Inventory # APC9781493660360

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Travis E Breeding
Published by Createspace, United States (2013)
ISBN 10: 1493660365 ISBN 13: 9781493660360
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Book Description Createspace, United States, 2013. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.Since graduating high school in 2004, I have seen many changes in the world. No changes have occurred more rapidly than those in the area of technology. When I walked across the stage to receive my diploma, Facebook did not exist. It was only a few years earlier when the use of cell phones became widespread. In 2004, text messaging wasn t very popular. When I think of how much technology has changed the lives of people all around the world in the past ten years I think about how it s also changed the lives of people with autism and other disabilities. This technology boom has been a positive thing for the autism community by creating more platforms and avenues to improve communications for people who struggle with this issue. Being able to text message someone instead of picking up a phone, dialing their number, and actually talking to them on the phone is a lot easier. It s a lot less stressful than a phone conversation. Texting is an easier form of communication for me. When you are talking to someone in person the response needed to keep the communication and conversation flowing is an immediate one. In texting, I can take a moment to think through what I want to say. The same can be said for Facebook and email. It s a form of communication that can be beneficial for people with autism. However, I don t want to be a person with autism who hides behind this form of communication. Along with the many pros there are to the online form of communication and texting there are also many cons and sometimes the cons far outweigh the pros. When teaching people with autism to use Facebook, texting, or any type of online communication it is important to teach them how to use this technology appropriately. Again, it amazes me how neurotypicals, or people not on the autism spectrum, just automatically seem to know and understand how to use Facebook. It s a new technology that came into their lives and they just picked it up and seemingly, with little effort, figured out how to use it. Someone with autism is not going to get this. One of the more frustrating things for me is that I always take things literally. When chatting with someone on Facebook there is a chat box on the right side of the screen. In the chat box the names of your friends who appear to be online and able to chat are there with a green dot next to the name. Because Facebook has shown me with the use of a green dot that these people are ready to chat I think it s appropriate to send them a message in the chat. Hey, what s up? or Hi, how are you? I am often left confused because the individual I sent the message to either doesn t reply or, it takes them a half hour to do so. I am confused because the green dot indicated that these people were online and ready to chat with me. Because I get no response I assume the person doesn t like me or doesn t want to talk to me. This causes me to develop negative feelings about myself. I start asking myself why my friend didn t want to talk to me. What did I do wrong? I now know, because of the things I have learned that this isn t the case. But if we don t educate children and teens, especially those on the autism spectrum, about this as they are growing up and learning how to use Facebook and online communication it can cause them to have huge issues with self-esteem. Facebook has a new feature. It lets you know when your friend sees the message you sent. Now, if you re chatting or if you send your friend a Facebook message a little check mark with the words seen pops up when your friend sees your message. This book goes into detail about a lot of the unwritten rules used to socialize on Facebook. Bookseller Inventory # APC9781493660360

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Book Description CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform. Paperback. Book Condition: New. This item is printed on demand. 78 pages. Dimensions: 9.0in. x 6.0in. x 0.2in.Since graduating high school in 2004, I have seen many changes in the world. No changes have occurred more rapidly than those in the area of technology. When I walked across the stage to receive my diploma, Facebook did not exist. It was only a few years earlier when the use of cell phones became widespread. In 2004, text messaging wasnt very popular. When I think of how much technology has changed the lives of people all around the world in the past ten years I think about how its also changed the lives of people with autism and other disabilities. This technology boom has been a positive thing for the autism community by creating more platforms and avenues to improve communications for people who struggle with this issue. Being able to text message someone instead of picking up a phone, dialing their number, and actually talking to them on the phone is a lot easier. Its a lot less stressful than a phone conversation. Texting is an easier form of communication for me. When you are talking to someone in person the response needed to keep the communication and conversation flowing is an immediate one. In texting, I can take a moment to think through what I want to say. The same can be said for Facebook and email. Its a form of communication that can be beneficial for people with autism. However, I dont want to be a person with autism who hides behind this form of communication. Along with the many pros there are to the online form of communication and texting there are also many cons and sometimes the cons far outweigh the pros. When teaching people with autism to use Facebook, texting, or any type of online communication it is important to teach them how to use this technology appropriately. Again, it amazes me how neurotypicals, or people not on the autism spectrum, just automatically seem to know and understand how to use Facebook. Its a new technology that came into their lives and they just picked it up and seemingly, with little effort, figured out how to use it. Someone with autism is not going to get this. One of the more frustrating things for me is that I always take things literally. When chatting with someone on Facebook there is a chat box on the right side of the screen. In the chat box the names of your friends who appear to be online and able to chat are there with a green dot next to the name. Because Facebook has shown me with the use of a green dot that these people are ready to chat I think its appropriate to send them a message in the chat. Hey, whats up or Hi, how are you I am often left confused because the individual I sent the message to either doesnt reply or, it takes them a half hour to do so. I am confused because the green dot indicated that these people were online and ready to chat with me. Because I get no response I assume the person doesnt like me or doesnt want to talk to me. This causes me to develop negative feelings about myself. I start asking myself why my friend didnt want to talk to me. What did I do wrong I now know, because of the things I have learned that this isnt the case. But if we dont educate children and teens, especially those on the autism spectrum, about this as they are growing up and learning how to use Facebook and online communication it can cause them to have huge issues with self-esteem. Facebook has a new feature. It lets you know when your friend sees the message you sent. Now, if youre chatting or if you send your friend a Facebook message a little check mark with the words seen pops up when your friend sees your message. This book goes into detail about a lot of the unwritten rules used to socialize on Facebook. This item ships from La Vergne,TN. Paperback. Bookseller Inventory # 9781493660360

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