The Greatest Civil War Battles: The Battle of Nashville

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9781512040937: The Greatest Civil War Battles: The Battle of Nashville
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*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the fighting by generals and soldiers on both sides *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents “Never had there been such an overwhelming victory during the Civil War - indeed, never in American military history.” - Wiley Ford’s comment on the Franklin-Nashville Campaign As Sherman began his infamous march to the sea, Lincoln instructed Grant to redirect General George H. Thomas’ efforts back to Tennessee to protect Union supply lines and stop the offensive mounted by Confederate general John Bell Hood. Hood had broken away from Atlanta and was trying to compel Sherman to follow him, thus diverting him from his intended path of destruction. With Sherman marching east toward the sea, he directed Thomas to try to block Hood around Nashville. On November 30, the Union army began digging in around Franklin, and that afternoon Hood ordered a frontal assault on the dug in Union army which deeply upset his own officers. Hood stressed the necessity of defeating Schofield’s forces before Thomas could arrive, though some historians believe his decision to mount a frontal attack was a rash decision made out of fury at the fact Schofield had escaped his grasp. Either way, after repeated frontal assaults failed to create a gap in the Union lines, Schofield withdrew his men across the river on the night of November 30, successfully escaping Hood’s army. Meanwhile, Hood had inflicted nearly 8,000 casualties upon his army (men the Confederacy could scarcely afford to lose), while the Union lost about a quarter of that. Despite practically wrecking his army, which was now only about 25,000 strong, Hood marched his battered army to a position outside Nashville, Tennessee, where he took up defensive positions while awaiting reinforcements from Texas. On December 1, General Thomas sent word to Grant that he had “retired to the fortifications around Nashville until I can get my cavalry equipped”, a reference to the fact that Forrest’s cavalry had more than double the manpower of the Union cavalry. But Thomas also added that “if Hood attacks our position, [we] would be seriously damaged, but if he makes no attack until our cavalry can be equipped, [I] or General Schofield will move against him at once.” The following day Grant wired back, “If Hood is permitted to remain quietly about Nashville, you will lose all the road back to Chattanooga, and possibly have to abandon the line of the Tennessee. Should he attack you it is all well; but if he does not, you should attack him before he fortifies. Arm and put in the trenches your quartermaster’s employees, citizens, etc.” Even as Grant sniped at him, Thomas held back for nearly two weeks, partly because of a bad ice storm, and his delay nearly resulted in having Grant remove him from command. When reinforcements didn’t arrive by December 15, Thomas finally devised a complex two-pronged attack that feinted at Hood’s right flank while bringing overwhelming force on the left flank. During the two day battle, Thomas effectively destroyed Hood’s command, inflicting over 6,000 more Confederate casualties while losing less than half that. Upon reaching his headquarters at Tupelo, Mississippi, General Hood requested to be relieved of command rather than be removed in disgrace. The Greatest Civil War Battles: The Battle of Nashville analyzes the events leading up to the important Union victory and the end of the Franklin-Nashville Campaign. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Battle of Nashville like never before.

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Book Description Createspace, 2015. Paperback. Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. *Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the fighting by generals and soldiers on both sides *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents Never had there been such an overwhelming victory during the Civil War - indeed, never in American military history. - Wiley Ford s comment on the Franklin-Nashville Campaign As Sherman began his infamous march to the sea, Lincoln instructed Grant to redirect General George H. Thomas efforts back to Tennessee to protect Union supply lines and stop the offensive mounted by Confederate general John Bell Hood. Hood had broken away from Atlanta and was trying to compel Sherman to follow him, thus diverting him from his intended path of destruction. With Sherman marching east toward the sea, he directed Thomas to try to block Hood around Nashville. On November 30, the Union army began digging in around Franklin, and that afternoon Hood ordered a frontal assault on the dug in Union army which deeply upset his own officers. Hood stressed the necessity of defeating Schofield s forces before Thomas could arrive, though some historians believe his decision to mount a frontal attack was a rash decision made out of fury at the fact Schofield had escaped his grasp. Either way, after repeated frontal assaults failed to create a gap in the Union lines, Schofield withdrew his men across the river on the night of November 30, successfully escaping Hood s army. Meanwhile, Hood had inflicted nearly 8,000 casualties upon his army (men the Confederacy could scarcely afford to lose), while the Union lost about a quarter of that. Despite practically wrecking his army, which was now only about 25,000 strong, Hood marched his battered army to a position outside Nashville, Tennessee, where he took up defensive positions while awaiting reinforcements from Texas. On December 1, General Thomas sent word to Grant that he had retired to the fortifications around Nashville until I can get my cavalry equipped, a reference to the fact that Forrest s cavalry had more than double the manpower of the Union cavalry. But Thomas also added that if Hood attacks our position, [we] would be seriously damaged, but if he makes no attack until our cavalry can be equipped, [I] or General Schofield will move against him at once. The following day Grant wired back, If Hood is permitted to remain quietly about Nashville, you will lose all the road back to Chattanooga, and possibly have to abandon the line of the Tennessee. Should he attack you it is all well; but if he does not, you should attack him before he fortifies. Arm and put in the trenches your quartermaster s employees, citizens, etc. Even as Grant sniped at him, Thomas held back for nearly two weeks, partly because of a bad ice storm, and his delay nearly resulted in having Grant remove him from command. When reinforcements didn t arrive by December 15, Thomas finally devised a complex two-pronged attack that feinted at Hood s right flank while bringing overwhelming force on the left flank. During the two day battle, Thomas effectively destroyed Hood s command, inflicting over 6,000 more Confederate casualties while losing less than half that. Upon reaching his headquarters at Tupelo, Mississippi, General Hood requested to be relieved of command rather than be removed in disgrace. The Greatest Civil War Battles: The Battle of Nashville analyzes the events leading up to the important Union victory and the end of the Franklin-Nashville Campaign. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Battle of Nashville like never before. Seller Inventory # APC9781512040937

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Book Description Createspace, 2015. Paperback. Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the fighting by generals and soldiers on both sides *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents Never had there been such an overwhelming victory during the Civil War - indeed, never in American military history. - Wiley Ford s comment on the Franklin-Nashville Campaign As Sherman began his infamous march to the sea, Lincoln instructed Grant to redirect General George H. Thomas efforts back to Tennessee to protect Union supply lines and stop the offensive mounted by Confederate general John Bell Hood. Hood had broken away from Atlanta and was trying to compel Sherman to follow him, thus diverting him from his intended path of destruction. With Sherman marching east toward the sea, he directed Thomas to try to block Hood around Nashville. On November 30, the Union army began digging in around Franklin, and that afternoon Hood ordered a frontal assault on the dug in Union army which deeply upset his own officers. Hood stressed the necessity of defeating Schofield s forces before Thomas could arrive, though some historians believe his decision to mount a frontal attack was a rash decision made out of fury at the fact Schofield had escaped his grasp. Either way, after repeated frontal assaults failed to create a gap in the Union lines, Schofield withdrew his men across the river on the night of November 30, successfully escaping Hood s army. Meanwhile, Hood had inflicted nearly 8,000 casualties upon his army (men the Confederacy could scarcely afford to lose), while the Union lost about a quarter of that. Despite practically wrecking his army, which was now only about 25,000 strong, Hood marched his battered army to a position outside Nashville, Tennessee, where he took up defensive positions while awaiting reinforcements from Texas. On December 1, General Thomas sent word to Grant that he had retired to the fortifications around Nashville until I can get my cavalry equipped, a reference to the fact that Forrest s cavalry had more than double the manpower of the Union cavalry. But Thomas also added that if Hood attacks our position, [we] would be seriously damaged, but if he makes no attack until our cavalry can be equipped, [I] or General Schofield will move against him at once. The following day Grant wired back, If Hood is permitted to remain quietly about Nashville, you will lose all the road back to Chattanooga, and possibly have to abandon the line of the Tennessee. Should he attack you it is all well; but if he does not, you should attack him before he fortifies. Arm and put in the trenches your quartermaster s employees, citizens, etc. Even as Grant sniped at him, Thomas held back for nearly two weeks, partly because of a bad ice storm, and his delay nearly resulted in having Grant remove him from command. When reinforcements didn t arrive by December 15, Thomas finally devised a complex two-pronged attack that feinted at Hood s right flank while bringing overwhelming force on the left flank. During the two day battle, Thomas effectively destroyed Hood s command, inflicting over 6,000 more Confederate casualties while losing less than half that. Upon reaching his headquarters at Tupelo, Mississippi, General Hood requested to be relieved of command rather than be removed in disgrace. The Greatest Civil War Battles: The Battle of Nashville analyzes the events leading up to the important Union victory and the end of the Franklin-Nashville Campaign. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Battle of Nashville like never before. Seller Inventory # APC9781512040937

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Book Description CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform. Paperback. Condition: New. This item is printed on demand. 54 pages. Dimensions: 9.0in. x 6.0in. x 0.1in.Includes pictures Includes accounts of the fighting by generals and soldiers on both sides Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading Includes a table of contents Never had there been such an overwhelming victory during the Civil War - indeed, never in American military history. - Wiley Fords comment on the Franklin-Nashville Campaign As Sherman began his infamous march to the sea, Lincoln instructed Grant to redirect General George H. Thomas efforts back to Tennessee to protect Union supply lines and stop the offensive mounted by Confederate general John Bell Hood. Hood had broken away from Atlanta and was trying to compel Sherman to follow him, thus diverting him from his intended path of destruction. With Sherman marching east toward the sea, he directed Thomas to try to block Hood around Nashville. On November 30, the Union army began digging in around Franklin, and that afternoon Hood ordered a frontal assault on the dug in Union army which deeply upset his own officers. Hood stressed the necessity of defeating Schofields forces before Thomas could arrive, though some historians believe his decision to mount a frontal attack was a rash decision made out of fury at the fact Schofield had escaped his grasp. Either way, after repeated frontal assaults failed to create a gap in the Union lines, Schofield withdrew his men across the river on the night of November 30, successfully escaping Hoods army. Meanwhile, Hood had inflicted nearly 8, 000 casualties upon his army (men the Confederacy could scarcely afford to lose), while the Union lost about a quarter of that. Despite practically wrecking his army, which was now only about 25, 000 strong, Hood marched his battered army to a position outside Nashville, Tennessee, where he took up defensive positions while awaiting reinforcements from Texas. On December 1, General Thomas sent word to Grant that he had retired to the fortifications around Nashville until I can get my cavalry equipped, a reference to the fact that Forrests cavalry had more than double the manpower of the Union cavalry. But Thomas also added that if Hood attacks our position, we would be seriously damaged, but if he makes no attack until our cavalry can be equipped, I or General Schofield will move against him at once. The following day Grant wired back, If Hood is permitted to remain quietly about Nashville, you will lose all the road back to Chattanooga, and possibly have to abandon the line of the Tennessee. Should he attack you it is all well; but if he does not, you should attack him before he fortifies. Arm and put in the trenches your quartermasters employees, citizens, etc. Even as Grant sniped at him, Thomas held back for nearly two weeks, partly because of a bad ice storm, and his delay nearly resulted in having Grant remove him from command. When reinforcements didnt arrive by December 15, Thomas finally devised a complex two-pronged attack that feinted at Hoods right flank while bringing overwhelming force on the left flank. During the two day battle, Thomas effectively destroyed Hoods command, inflicting over 6, 000 more Confederate casualties while losing less than half that. Upon reaching his headquarters at Tupelo, Mississippi, General Hood requested to be relieved of command rather than be removed in disgrace. The Greatest Civil War Battles: The Battle of Nashville analyzes the events leading up to the important Union victory and the end of the Franklin-Nashville Campaign. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Battle of Nashville like never before. This item ships from La Vergne,TN. Paperback. Seller Inventory # 9781512040937

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Book Description Createspace, 2015. PAP. Condition: New. New Book. Delivered from our UK warehouse in 4 to 14 business days. THIS BOOK IS PRINTED ON DEMAND. Established seller since 2000. Seller Inventory # IQ-9781512040937

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