Palms of Papyrus: Being Forthright Studies of Men and Books; With Some Pages from a Man's Inner Life

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9781514846957: Palms of Papyrus: Being Forthright Studies of Men and Books; With Some Pages from a Man's Inner Life

An excerpt from the beginning of the first chapter:
In the Attic (By way of preface.)

IN old days, in merrie England, the chapman or pamphleteer set up shop in an attic, as much for economy's sake as to be out of easy reach of the police. Commonly he bit the thumb at Government and the bilks were his natural foes. Great men out of place lent him secret support and countenance, paying the costs of his perilous trade and supplying him matter for his broadsides. His fidelity to his patrons was his best virtue; in other respects of conduct he was, it is to be feared, no better than he should have been. But the life was one of constant adventure and as such appealed to many daring spirits. Often they had to move, and quickly too, yet they were not always quick enough for the emissaries of Government. To stand in the pillory, there to submit to the nameless outrages of the London mob; to spend long years in jails fouler than a modern sewer; to be whipped and branded by the sovereign majesty of the law; to be hunted from one rookery to another—such was the lot of many a bold pamphleteer of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth centuries.

Ah, well, my lads, they had a stirring time of it, for all their hard lines, and potently, though obscurely, they made themselves felt on public opinion, which, as hath been said, is but history in the making. Peace to them!—they and their types, their plotting and pamphleteering, their ballads and broadsides, have long since vanished from the scene; but some echo of their ancient hardihood, some smack of real service to the good old cause of liberty, which to render they bravely risked life and limb,—still linger in the world.

I therefore feel that in publishing Papyrus from an attic I am in accord with some worthy literary traditions. To be sure, it's a very nice attic and roomy enough; well lighted, too, with walls and ceiling finished off and kalsomined. Strictly speaking, the Papyrus occupies only half the attic; the other half, which by a lucky chance is quite separate and partitioned off, the younger children use for a playhouse on rainy days. Oh, and I had almost forgotten, the family linen is sometimes dried there with great convenience.

Allah is both wise and good: He sometimes puts it into the stony heart of a landlord (Jersey landlord at that) to make unwitting provision for the Children of the Dream.

The stairway leading to both attics is quite dark and it turns sharply, but we don't feel that to be a great objection, as the Youngest is now walking and only swarms when he is going down stairs—which he does backward and with remarkable celerity.

Once a month the children have great fun carrying the little brown booklets from the lower floor, where the printer delivers them, to the attic; and again from the attic to the lower floor, when ready to be mailed. That is, they think it's great fun—and surely a large family is not without its compensations.

The Papyrus, by the way, is just the age of our Youngest but One, a five-year-old girl. I am not sure of which I am the fonder, but the Mother, with a touch of artistic jealousy, says she is.

I love this little attic room. Here I spend the only quiet hours that I may really call mine. Here, with the world and its taskmasters shut out, I cheat myself with a dream of independence—ah, an uneasy dream at best, and a fleeting one, but yet it links day unto day with a thread of gold. The good thoughts that come only with silence—peace without and within—have here their dwelling place. Here, too, I listen oft to a Voice which speaks of the sure though late reward that waits on unyielding effort, on hope that springs anew from each defeat, on faith in self that can stand against the world, on fidelity to the Dream!

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Book Description Createspace Independent Publishing Platform, United States, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. An excerpt from the beginning of the first chapter: In the Attic (By way of preface.) IN old days, in merrie England, the chapman or pamphleteer set up shop in an attic, as much for economy s sake as to be out of easy reach of the police. Commonly he bit the thumb at Government and the bilks were his natural foes. Great men out of place lent him secret support and countenance, paying the costs of his perilous trade and supplying him matter for his broadsides. His fidelity to his patrons was his best virtue; in other respects of conduct he was, it is to be feared, no better than he should have been. But the life was one of constant adventure and as such appealed to many daring spirits. Often they had to move, and quickly too, yet they were not always quick enough for the emissaries of Government. To stand in the pillory, there to submit to the nameless outrages of the London mob; to spend long years in jails fouler than a modern sewer; to be whipped and branded by the sovereign majesty of the law; to be hunted from one rookery to another-such was the lot of many a bold pamphleteer of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth centuries. Ah, well, my lads, they had a stirring time of it, for all their hard lines, and potently, though obscurely, they made themselves felt on public opinion, which, as hath been said, is but history in the making. Peace to them!-they and their types, their plotting and pamphleteering, their ballads and broadsides, have long since vanished from the scene; but some echo of their ancient hardihood, some smack of real service to the good old cause of liberty, which to render they bravely risked life and limb, -still linger in the world. I therefore feel that in publishing Papyrus from an attic I am in accord with some worthy literary traditions. To be sure, it s a very nice attic and roomy enough; well lighted, too, with walls and ceiling finished off and kalsomined. Strictly speaking, the Papyrus occupies only half the attic; the other half, which by a lucky chance is quite separate and partitioned off, the younger children use for a playhouse on rainy days. Oh, and I had almost forgotten, the family linen is sometimes dried there with great convenience. Allah is both wise and good: He sometimes puts it into the stony heart of a landlord (Jersey landlord at that) to make unwitting provision for the Children of the Dream. The stairway leading to both attics is quite dark and it turns sharply, but we don t feel that to be a great objection, as the Youngest is now walking and only swarms when he is going down stairs-which he does backward and with remarkable celerity. Once a month the children have great fun carrying the little brown booklets from the lower floor, where the printer delivers them, to the attic; and again from the attic to the lower floor, when ready to be mailed. That is, they think it s great fun-and surely a large family is not without its compensations. The Papyrus, by the way, is just the age of our Youngest but One, a five-year-old girl. I am not sure of which I am the fonder, but the Mother, with a touch of artistic jealousy, says she is. I love this little attic room. Here I spend the only quiet hours that I may really call mine. Here, with the world and its taskmasters shut out, I cheat myself with a dream of independence-ah, an uneasy dream at best, and a fleeting one, but yet it links day unto day with a thread of gold. The good thoughts that come only with silence-peace without and within-have here their dwelling place. Here, too, I listen oft to a Voice which speaks of the sure though late reward that waits on unyielding effort, on hope that springs anew from each defeat, on faith in self that can stand against the world, on fidelity to the Dream!. Bookseller Inventory # APC9781514846957

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Michael Monahan
Published by Createspace Independent Publishing Platform, United States (2015)
ISBN 10: 1514846950 ISBN 13: 9781514846957
New Paperback Quantity Available: 10
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Seller:
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Book Description Createspace Independent Publishing Platform, United States, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.An excerpt from the beginning of the first chapter: In the Attic (By way of preface.) IN old days, in merrie England, the chapman or pamphleteer set up shop in an attic, as much for economy s sake as to be out of easy reach of the police. Commonly he bit the thumb at Government and the bilks were his natural foes. Great men out of place lent him secret support and countenance, paying the costs of his perilous trade and supplying him matter for his broadsides. His fidelity to his patrons was his best virtue; in other respects of conduct he was, it is to be feared, no better than he should have been. But the life was one of constant adventure and as such appealed to many daring spirits. Often they had to move, and quickly too, yet they were not always quick enough for the emissaries of Government. To stand in the pillory, there to submit to the nameless outrages of the London mob; to spend long years in jails fouler than a modern sewer; to be whipped and branded by the sovereign majesty of the law; to be hunted from one rookery to another-such was the lot of many a bold pamphleteer of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth centuries. Ah, well, my lads, they had a stirring time of it, for all their hard lines, and potently, though obscurely, they made themselves felt on public opinion, which, as hath been said, is but history in the making. Peace to them!-they and their types, their plotting and pamphleteering, their ballads and broadsides, have long since vanished from the scene; but some echo of their ancient hardihood, some smack of real service to the good old cause of liberty, which to render they bravely risked life and limb, -still linger in the world. I therefore feel that in publishing Papyrus from an attic I am in accord with some worthy literary traditions. To be sure, it s a very nice attic and roomy enough; well lighted, too, with walls and ceiling finished off and kalsomined. Strictly speaking, the Papyrus occupies only half the attic; the other half, which by a lucky chance is quite separate and partitioned off, the younger children use for a playhouse on rainy days. Oh, and I had almost forgotten, the family linen is sometimes dried there with great convenience. Allah is both wise and good: He sometimes puts it into the stony heart of a landlord (Jersey landlord at that) to make unwitting provision for the Children of the Dream. The stairway leading to both attics is quite dark and it turns sharply, but we don t feel that to be a great objection, as the Youngest is now walking and only swarms when he is going down stairs-which he does backward and with remarkable celerity. Once a month the children have great fun carrying the little brown booklets from the lower floor, where the printer delivers them, to the attic; and again from the attic to the lower floor, when ready to be mailed. That is, they think it s great fun-and surely a large family is not without its compensations. The Papyrus, by the way, is just the age of our Youngest but One, a five-year-old girl. I am not sure of which I am the fonder, but the Mother, with a touch of artistic jealousy, says she is. I love this little attic room. Here I spend the only quiet hours that I may really call mine. Here, with the world and its taskmasters shut out, I cheat myself with a dream of independence-ah, an uneasy dream at best, and a fleeting one, but yet it links day unto day with a thread of gold. The good thoughts that come only with silence-peace without and within-have here their dwelling place. Here, too, I listen oft to a Voice which speaks of the sure though late reward that waits on unyielding effort, on hope that springs anew from each defeat, on faith in self that can stand against the world, on fidelity to the Dream!. Bookseller Inventory # APC9781514846957

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