The Theory of Contract in Its Social Light

0 avg rating
( 0 ratings by Goodreads )
 
9781523835263: The Theory of Contract in Its Social Light

From the Introduction.
There is no branch of legal knowledge which is of more general utility, than that which regards the rules of evidence. The first point in every trial, is to establish the facts of the case; for he who fails in his proof, fails in everything. Although the jurists hold the law to be always fixed and certain, yet the discovery of the fact, they say, may deceive the most skillful. No work has as yet appeared in the English language on the theory of evidence; and the nature of circumstantial evidence has been still less inquired into. The object of the present Essay is to inquire into some of the more general principles of legal proof, and particularly into that species of proof which is founded on presumptions, and is known to the English lawyer by the name of circumstantial evidence.
Evidence and proof are often confounded, as implying the same idea; but they differ, as cause and effect. Proof is the legal credence which the law gives to any statement, by witnesses or writings; evidence is the legal process by which that proof is made. Hence, we say, that the law admits of no proof but such as is made agreeably to its own principles.
The principles of evidence are founded on our observations on human conduct, on common life, and living manners: they are not just because they are rules of law; but they are rules of law because they are just and reasonable.
It has been found, from common observation, that certain circumstances warrant certain presumptions. Thus, that a mother shall feel an affection for her child,—that a man shall be influenced by his interest,—that youth shall be susceptible of the passion of love,—are laws of our general nature, and grounds of evidence in every country. Of the two women who contended for their right to the child, she was declared to be the mother who would not consent to its being divided betwixt them. When Lothario tells us that he stole alone, at night, into the chamber of his mistress," hot with the Tuscan grape, and high in blood!" Cœtera quis nescit?
As the principles of evidence are founded on the observations of what we have seen, or believed to have been passing in real life, they will accordingly be suited to the state of the society in which we live, or to the manners and habits of the times. The following passage, in the excellent memoirs of Philip de Comines, I believe to be perfectly true, because it is confirmed by other accounts of the general state of manners at the period when he wrote.
Louis XL distributed, he asserts, for corrupt purposes, sixteen thousand crowns among the King of England's officers that were about his person, particularly to the chancellor, the master of the rolls, the lord chancellor, &c. ....

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

Top Search Results from the AbeBooks Marketplace

1.

Watt, W. a.
ISBN 10: 1523835265 ISBN 13: 9781523835263
New Quantity Available: > 20
Print on Demand
Seller:
Pbshop
(Wood Dale, IL, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description 2016. PAP. Book Condition: New. New Book. Shipped from US within 10 to 14 business days. THIS BOOK IS PRINTED ON DEMAND. Established seller since 2000. Bookseller Inventory # IQ-9781523835263

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 4.60
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 3.99
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

2.

W A Watt
Published by Createspace Independent Publishing Platform, United States (2016)
ISBN 10: 1523835265 ISBN 13: 9781523835263
New Paperback Quantity Available: 10
Print on Demand
Seller:
The Book Depository US
(London, United Kingdom)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Createspace Independent Publishing Platform, United States, 2016. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. From the Introduction. There is no branch of legal knowledge which is of more general utility, than that which regards the rules of evidence. The first point in every trial, is to establish the facts of the case; for he who fails in his proof, fails in everything. Although the jurists hold the law to be always fixed and certain, yet the discovery of the fact, they say, may deceive the most skillful. No work has as yet appeared in the English language on the theory of evidence; and the nature of circumstantial evidence has been still less inquired into. The object of the present Essay is to inquire into some of the more general principles of legal proof, and particularly into that species of proof which is founded on presumptions, and is known to the English lawyer by the name of circumstantial evidence. Evidence and proof are often confounded, as implying the same idea; but they differ, as cause and effect. Proof is the legal credence which the law gives to any statement, by witnesses or writings; evidence is the legal process by which that proof is made. Hence, we say, that the law admits of no proof but such as is made agreeably to its own principles. The principles of evidence are founded on our observations on human conduct, on common life, and living manners: they are not just because they are rules of law; but they are rules of law because they are just and reasonable. It has been found, from common observation, that certain circumstances warrant certain presumptions. Thus, that a mother shall feel an affection for her child, -that a man shall be influenced by his interest, -that youth shall be susceptible of the passion of love, -are laws of our general nature, and grounds of evidence in every country. Of the two women who contended for their right to the child, she was declared to be the mother who would not consent to its being divided betwixt them. When Lothario tells us that he stole alone, at night, into the chamber of his mistress, hot with the Tuscan grape, and high in blood! C tera quis nescit? As the principles of evidence are founded on the observations of what we have seen, or believed to have been passing in real life, they will accordingly be suited to the state of the society in which we live, or to the manners and habits of the times. The following passage, in the excellent memoirs of Philip de Comines, I believe to be perfectly true, because it is confirmed by other accounts of the general state of manners at the period when he wrote. Louis XL distributed, he asserts, for corrupt purposes, sixteen thousand crowns among the King of England s officers that were about his person, particularly to the chancellor, the master of the rolls, the lord chancellor, c. . Bookseller Inventory # APC9781523835263

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 8.92
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

3.

W A Watt
Published by Createspace Independent Publishing Platform, United States (2016)
ISBN 10: 1523835265 ISBN 13: 9781523835263
New Paperback Quantity Available: 10
Print on Demand
Seller:
The Book Depository
(London, United Kingdom)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Createspace Independent Publishing Platform, United States, 2016. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.From the Introduction. There is no branch of legal knowledge which is of more general utility, than that which regards the rules of evidence. The first point in every trial, is to establish the facts of the case; for he who fails in his proof, fails in everything. Although the jurists hold the law to be always fixed and certain, yet the discovery of the fact, they say, may deceive the most skillful. No work has as yet appeared in the English language on the theory of evidence; and the nature of circumstantial evidence has been still less inquired into. The object of the present Essay is to inquire into some of the more general principles of legal proof, and particularly into that species of proof which is founded on presumptions, and is known to the English lawyer by the name of circumstantial evidence. Evidence and proof are often confounded, as implying the same idea; but they differ, as cause and effect. Proof is the legal credence which the law gives to any statement, by witnesses or writings; evidence is the legal process by which that proof is made. Hence, we say, that the law admits of no proof but such as is made agreeably to its own principles. The principles of evidence are founded on our observations on human conduct, on common life, and living manners: they are not just because they are rules of law; but they are rules of law because they are just and reasonable. It has been found, from common observation, that certain circumstances warrant certain presumptions. Thus, that a mother shall feel an affection for her child, -that a man shall be influenced by his interest, -that youth shall be susceptible of the passion of love, -are laws of our general nature, and grounds of evidence in every country. Of the two women who contended for their right to the child, she was declared to be the mother who would not consent to its being divided betwixt them. When Lothario tells us that he stole alone, at night, into the chamber of his mistress, hot with the Tuscan grape, and high in blood! C tera quis nescit? As the principles of evidence are founded on the observations of what we have seen, or believed to have been passing in real life, they will accordingly be suited to the state of the society in which we live, or to the manners and habits of the times. The following passage, in the excellent memoirs of Philip de Comines, I believe to be perfectly true, because it is confirmed by other accounts of the general state of manners at the period when he wrote. Louis XL distributed, he asserts, for corrupt purposes, sixteen thousand crowns among the King of England s officers that were about his person, particularly to the chancellor, the master of the rolls, the lord chancellor, c. . Bookseller Inventory # APC9781523835263

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 9.18
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

4.

Watt, W. A.
Published by CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN 10: 1523835265 ISBN 13: 9781523835263
New PAPERBACK Quantity Available: > 20
Seller:
Russell Books
(Victoria, BC, Canada)
Rating
[?]

Book Description CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform. PAPERBACK. Book Condition: New. 1523835265 Special order direct from the distributor. Bookseller Inventory # ING9781523835263

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 7.86
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 7.00
From Canada to U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

5.

Watt, W. a.
ISBN 10: 1523835265 ISBN 13: 9781523835263
New Quantity Available: > 20
Print on Demand
Seller:
Books2Anywhere
(Fairford, GLOS, United Kingdom)
Rating
[?]

Book Description 2016. PAP. Book Condition: New. New Book. Delivered from our UK warehouse in 3 to 5 business days. THIS BOOK IS PRINTED ON DEMAND. Established seller since 2000. Bookseller Inventory # IQ-9781523835263

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 4.60
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 11.98
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds