Living Well with Celiac Disease: Abundance Beyond Wheat and Gluten

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9781553694045: Living Well with Celiac Disease: Abundance Beyond Wheat and Gluten
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Celiac disease is on the rise. It is now known to affect one in 133 Americans, with many yet to be diagnosed. For those affected, eating presents quite a challenge.

As author Claudine Crangle explains in her book, Living Well with Celiac Disease: Abundance Beyond Wheat and Gluten, Second Edition, avoiding gluten (the protein in wheat) is like walking in a minefield because it lurks in the most unsuspected foods, from soy sauce and bouillon cubes to salami and instant coffee.

Now completely revised to include the latest news on medical research, new original recipes, a meal planning section, updated gluten-free resource and a user-friendly index. Living Well with Celiac Disease opens up a whole new world of culinary delights and will change old notions of what it means to be on a "restricted" diet. The book also includes a Foreword by Cynthia Rudert, M.D., Medical Advisor for the Celiac Disease Foundation and the Gluten Intolerance Group of America. Dr. Rudert has one of the largest practices in North America dedicated to celiac disease and treats patients from all over the world.

Living Well with Celiac Disease provides essential strategies for anyone who cannot tolerate wheat or gluten due to celiac disease. This book is also for those looking for relief from symptoms of numerous other conditions such as Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, MS, ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, ADD, autism, schizophrenia, eczema and psoriasis, candida, diverticulitis, migraines, and chronic sinusitis.

Crangle covers practical issues, such as how to organize your kitchen cupboards, ordering in restaurants, grocery shopping and traveling, as well as the personal territory of explaining diet guidelines to party hosts and first dates. She guides you through the host of multi-ethnic cuisine readily available in urban centers, and suggests many new and delicious foods and recipes from countries where wheat is not a diet staple. The book also includes a chapter on where to find support groups, other books and magazines devoted to gluten-free living, and a comprehensive listing of Internet sites for celiacs worldwide.

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About the Author:

"Great healthy lifestyle advice for those with celiac disease."
~Shelley Case, B.Sc., RD and author of Gluten-Free Diet: A Comprehensive Resource Guide

"A no-nonsense, practical book filled with empathy, and more importantly, get-up-and-go which is a must for any newly diagnosed celiac patient or parent. Crangle advocates a healthy lifestyle with lots of variations, but no gluten. By the end of the book she feels like the celiac best friend you never had . . . definitely a book for the Christmas stocking."
~Coeliac News, Coeliac Society of Ireland

"A refreshingly positive approach to life without wheat."
~Living Without Magazine

"Living Well with Celiac Disease: Abundance Beyond Wheat and Gluten will both inform and inspire readers. Crangle's positive focus on the many food alternatives, combined with her friendly and informative style and excellent advice, makes this a wonderful and necessary book for all who need to find optimum health on a wheat - and gluten-free diet."
~Dr. R. E. Warren, M.D., F.R.C.P.C., D.T.M. & H., Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto, Division of Gastroenterology St. Michael's Hospital

"A delightful, accessible and indispensable set of tools for managing life without wheat or gluten. This book is an invitation to happy and healthy gluten-free living and should find a home on the bookshelves of everyone with celiac disease."
~Bev Ruffo, Past President, Canadian Celiac Association

"Crangle's approach to 'free living' is beautifully empowering. I look forward to using this book as a reference for my own life as well as a tool for my patients." ~Sarah Baillie, B.Sc., N.D., Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine

"[This book] made the dietary needs associated with Celiac really clear and gave strategies for how to normalize one's social life in spite of having dietary restrictions."
~Complete Health magazine, Summer 2005

Excerpt. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.:

Gone Are the Days of the Flour Child

My parents bragged about having the perfect baby - at least until I began gnawing on teething biscuits. Every parent anticipates terrible two, but things just got progressively worse. By the time I was three I needed an exorcism.

My mother tells me that I would sit jammed between her legs and the kitchen cupboards screaming for hours with my frail arms wrapped tightly around her ankles as she washed dishes and cooked supper. Today, Children's Aid or Social Services would investigate the parents of a child who made regular visits to emergency for broken limbs. Instead, doctors told my mother that the little girl with sunken eyes and a pot-belly that screamed of starvation was simply a neurotic child.

On my fourth birthday, my baby brother was bigger than I was. Ironically, I received a set of cake mixes for the Easy Bake Oven I hoped to someday own. It's not a rare occurrence for a child to behave poorly at her birthday party, but I understand that I was a sickly little psycho terror. Finally, after almost three years of insanity, my mother reached the end of her rope. She handed my shell to the doctor and told him to do something with me or they would have to lock her up.

I spent many weeks undergoing prodding and tests. I moved into two different hospitals over a couple of months, while doctors tried to figure out why my little body was dying of malnutrition. It was our family GP who finally came up with the suggestion that I be tested for celiac disease. After a biopsy and positive diagnosis, my mother was handed a diet to follow and I was released from the world of metal bed frames.

Within weeks, my emaciated body began to fill out, and a new child emerged. Aside from my tiny stature, I was starting to look like any other kid about to enter kindergarten.

My mom stayed home and spent many a day experimenting with the one cookbook available to her. Many of these experiments never met my lips, but instead went straight from the baking sheet to the bin. The ingredients we take for granted these days were not as widely available as they are now and allergies and intolerance of foods were not nearly as socially understood, nor were they catered to. In 1972, health food stores were musty little places where the hippies shopped. And no one else was asking for soy flour.

My friends will tell you that when I first moved out on my own, I'd consider a can of nuked green beans and a bag of potato chips dinner. Chocolate was always on hand, and the coffeepot was forever brewing. I was gluten free.

At twenty-five, I moved to Italy and spent my first summer living with an East Indian and Italian couple. These were worldly people who introduced me to new flavor combinations in the simplest of foods. In the fall, I moved in with an old-school Italian man, and suddenly I was the person responsible to shop for and cook the meals if I was going to eat.

I had to learn fast. I picked up my Italian vocabulary in the kitchens of the neighbors and my friends' mothers. And it was in these kitchens that I acquired the pleasure of cooking and sharing food with others. I loved food, and the mothers loved my appetite. "Mangia bene!"

Even with all of that wonderful healthy food around I was unable to satiate my appetite for the fine gluten-free cookies, cakes and chocolate bars available in Europe. My last week in Italy was spent in a Roman hospital where a case of suspected appendicitis turned out to be an ovarian cyst. I returned home to Canada overweight and lethargic. My friend Sarah, who was studying naturopathic medicine, suggested that I make a trip to the clinic.

I believed I was very conscious of what went into my mouth. It wasn't until I was asked to do a diet diary that I realized I was eating a lot of flour - albeit gluten-free - and hence my diet was full of carbs and refined sugars. Living on a gluten-free diet doesn't necessarily mean living healthy. It was time to take a new look at what I'd been putting into my body. It was also time to take a hard look at the excuses I'd been making about all the junk I'd been eating because I was "so limited."

What a difference a diet makes. Again, it only took a few weeks to feel the benefits of a few simple changes. With the help of my naturopath, in three months I was in better shape than I'd ever been before. I'd finally signed a peace agreement with food, and the story of what happened in my subsequent explorations will follow in the chapters ahead.

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