Jon Jost's Frameup [VHS]

ISBN 13: 9781566871020

Jon Jost's Frameup [VHS]

 
9781566871020: Jon Jost's Frameup [VHS]
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It's love at first sight when ditzy waitress Beth-Ann pours a cup of joe for cocky ex-con Ricky-Lee. A match made in heaven, the two hit the road and head straight to hell, making a few stops along the way.

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Review:

In another of director Jon Jost's American investigations into the dual quest for money and romance, another of his pet themes emerges: a Maileresque study of the male criminal mind via Gary Gilmore. Probably the most sarcastic, sexually explicit homage ever paid to Hollywood (and American society), this imaginative re-creation of Arthur Penn's Bonnie and Clyde attempts to demystify the manufactured, romantic myth of the lonely desperado and the woman who falls for him. Ricky Lee (Howard Swain), fresh from the Washington State Reformatory, picks up Beth-Ann in a Coeur d'Alene diner. In a stolen pickup, they drive to the California Redwoods, gleefully "making like bunnies" in roadside motels along the way. Ricky Lee's preoccupations are with money, the law, and image (he keeps his mirrored shades on during sex); Beth-Ann is a cluster of paperback Harlequins and high-school superficialities: through internal monologues, the heartbreaking rift between the two characters and their romantic imaginations is felt. When they run out of cash, Ricky Lee holds up a convenience store, killing three people. An early anticipation of Dead Man Walking, Jost offers his characters none of the moral consolations, however bleak, that that picture allowed. Instead the camera is pointed more unforgivingly toward the fugitive romance-novel and true-crime imagination. --Christopher Chase

From the Back Cover:

It's love at first sight when ditzy waitress Beth-Ann (Nancy Carlin) pours a cup of joe for cocky ex-con Ricky-Lee (Howard Swain). After a night in a motel room "making like bunnies," Ricky-Lee tells Beth-Ann to "dump the job," and she does. Ricky-Lee is the kind of guy who as a kid liked to be the Indian in Cowboys & Indians because "you can run, hide, sneak up on people from the back you get to do bad things, and I always thought that was the fun part." Beth-Ann is the kind of girl to whom "it always seemed easier to go along with whoever and their idea -- usually some guy who maybe all the girls thought was real cool but usually turned out to be a big jerk. I never thought about it, except, I don't know, sometimes I think maybe I don't really know how to really think." A match made in heaven, Ricky-Lee and Beth-Ann hit the road and head straight to hell, making a few stops along the way. JON JOST'S FRAMEUP: TWELVE MOVEMENTS TO THE ONLY CONCLUSION is an all-American tragicomedy from the cutting-edge director who brought you ALL THE VERMEERS IN NEW YORK and SURE FIRE.

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