The Early Intervention Teaming Handbook: The Primary Service Provider Approach

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9781598570854: The Early Intervention Teaming Handbook: The Primary Service Provider Approach
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Early childhood professionals: looking for an effective way to ensure coordinated, family-centered services for young children and families? Discover the why and how of the primary service provider (PSP) approach to teaming, the widely used, evidence-based model that more and more states are adopting to strengthen care and services and improve family outcomes.

Developed by the early childhood experts who pioneered the PSP approach to teaming, this is the first how-to guide that clearly lays out the logistics and benefits of making one team member the consistent point of contact with a family.

You'll get concrete, practical guidance on how to

  • ensure buy-in and support from program leaders and team members
  • establish a cohesive team that collaborates effectively
  • fully introduce families to the procedures and practices of the PSP approach
  • develop family-focused and child-focused IFSP outcome statements
  • select the most appropriate primary service provider for each family
  • master the three essential components of a successful home visit
  • adopt a flexible, activity-based approach to scheduling that promotes child learning and development
  • coordinate joint visits with other service providers
  • conduct successful, efficient team meetings to share expertise and resources

Realistic case studies and transcripts from team meetings give you vivid demonstrations of best practices. And the photocopiable forms, tools, and checklists—such as Role Expectation Checklist; Sample Early Intervention Program Brochure; Sample IFSP; and Joint Visit Planning Tool—guide your team every step of the way as you implement the PSP approach.

The perfect complement to the authors' bestselling Early Childhood Coaching Handbook, this practical, reader-friendly guide is your blueprint for better, more responsive care and services—and better outcomes for young children and families.


A featured book in our Effective Early Intervention Kit!

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

About the Author:


M'Lisa L. Shelden, PT, Ph.D., is Director of the Family, Infant and Preschool Program (FIPP) at Western Carolina Center and an associate research scientist at the Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute in Morganton, North Carolina. Prior to accepting her appointment at FIPP, Dr. Shelden was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Science at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. She is a graduate Fellow of the ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families, and she has also served the Section of Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association. She is a member of the editorial board for the Journal of Early Intervention. Dr. Shelden has co-authored several articles related to early intervention teamwork and a chapter related to physical therapy personnel preparation. She presents nationally on topics related to transition, inclusion, coaching, evaluation and assessment, use of a primary coach model, and provision of supports in natural environments.

Dathan Rush is the Associate Director of the Family, Infant and Preschool Program (FIPP) at Western Carolina Center and a research associate at the Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute in Morganton, North Carolina. Prior to accepting his position at FIPP, Mr. Rush was a clinical assistant professor and personnel development consultant in the Lee Mitchener Tolbert Center for Developmental Disabilities at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City. He served as Assistant Director of the Oklahoma SoonerStart Early Intervention Program at the State Department of Health from 1992 to 1999. He served as an editorial board member of the journal Infants and Young Children until 2002 and has published articles in the areas of in-service training, coaching, supporting children and families in natural learning environments, and teaming in early intervention. He is past president and former executive council member of the Oklahoma Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Mr. Rush has presented numerous workshops nationally on topics related to team building, use of a primary coach model of support, training of trainers, coaching, and provision of supports in natural environments.

Dr. McWilliam is the Siskin Endowed Chair of Research in Early Childhood Education, Development, and Intervention at Siskin Children’s Institute. He is also a professor of education at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga and an adjoint professor of special education at Vanderbilt University. He has formerly been a professor of pediatrics at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, a senior scientist at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, and a professor of education at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. McWilliam’s research centers on infants, toddlers, and preschoolers with and without disabilities, with a specific focus on child engagement, service delivery models, and collaboration with families. He has provided consultation, training, and technical assistance across the United States and in some countries overseas on providing early intervention in natural environments and on the Engagement Classroom Model. His Routines-Based Interview (RBI) is a widely used method of assessing families’ needs and developing individualized family service plan (IFSP) outcomes and individualized education program (IEP) goals.


Excerpt. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.:

Excerpted from Chapter 2 of The Early Intervention Teaming Handbook, by M'Lisa L. Shelden, PT, Ph.D., & Dathan D. Rush, Ed.D., CCC-SLP. Copyright© 2013 by Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Research Foundations of a Primary Service Provider Approach to Teaming

The information in Chapter 1 describes the requirement of teams under Part C early intervention. The chapter also acknowledges the use of a PSP as an accepted teaming approach by the professional associations representing the disciplines most closely aligned with early intervention (ECSE, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and speech-language pathology). Furthermore, the guidance documents provided by NECTAC stipulate the use of a PSP approach to teaming as one of the seven key principles for implementing early intervention in natural environments. To further support and substantiate using a PSP as specified in the key principles, we have identified three fundamental areas of research that define the characteristics and implementation conditions of PSP teaming practices: 1) a defined team, 2) a PSP as the team liaison to the family, and 3) team support for the PSP. The purpose of this chapter is to describe the research, define the characteristics, and identify the implementation conditions required for effective use of this teaming approach.

A Defined Team

Using teams to accomplish objectives that could not be accomplished otherwise is prevalent (West, Brodbeck, & Richter, 2004) in business and industry (Cohen & Bailey, 1997; Hoegl & Gemuenden, 2001), education (Flowers et al., 1999), early childhood (Briggs, 1997; Woodruff & McGonigel, 1988), and health care contexts (Borrill et al., 2001; West et al., 2002). Research indicates that teamwork in health care has also been reported to benefit both the health care workers (e.g., lower stress, higher retention rates, increased innovation by team members, increased job satisfaction) and recipients of services (e.g., lower mortality rates in hospitals, higher quality of care, improved cost-effectiveness) (Borrill et al., 2001; West et al., 2002).

Characteristics of Effective Teams

The literature on effective teams contains many studies that describe positive outcomes for teams that use the following task and structure factors. Consider how these task and structure factors apply to early childhood intervention teaming contexts. Team task(s) should allow members to use a variety of skills, result in meaningful work, and have significant consequences for other people (Bell, 2004; Borrill et al., 2001; Hackman, 1987). Effective early intervention teams allow their members to use disciplinary expertise as well as other specialized knowledge and skills based on experience and other individual characteristics. As an example, a team member may be identified as needed to support a child and family member because she has specialized knowledge about a diagnosis or condition. In addition to this specialized knowledge, the practitioner also happens to have personal experience of using public transportation. The family needing support also lives in the city and needs to gain access to public transportation to run errands. In this situation, the team member is allowed and encouraged to support the family using all that she knows, not only her discipline-specific expertise. Team members' ability to successfully support a broader range of families and family circumstances is enhanced when they use the professional and personal knowledge and experience of individual team members.
         The importance of a team's task is a critical component regarding inherent motivation of the team, the commitment the team members have to accomplishing the task, and the development of a collective team identity in terms of completion of a job well done. Motivation, commitment, satisfaction, and sense of responsibility are inherent to the task given to teams in the fields of health and education. For example early intervention teams are charged with and fully responsible for assisting family members and care providers in developing the confidence and competence individually needed (despite any and all challenges) to support the growth and development of the children in their care (IDEA 1997).
         The number of team members should be appropriate for the task (Bell, 2004; Larsson, 2000). The team should include enough members with the necessary specialized expertise to accomplish the assigned tasks (Bell, 2004). Although the meta-analysis of the teaming literature identifies no optimal number of team members (Bell, 2004), evidence is consistent with Hackman's (1987) early suggestions that teams with unnecessary members are not as productive as teams with the membership limited to those required to perform the task. Early intervention programs are required by federal law to have a multidisciplinary team of practitioners available to families of children with disabilities (IDEA 1997). The team must have sufficient team members with necessary knowledge and skills to meet the needs of eligible children and their families for a designated catchment area.
         Teams should have some degree of self-managing abilities because team self-management is related to enhanced team performance (Bell, 2004; Borrill et al., 2001; De Drue & West, 2001; Erez, LePine, & Elms, 2002). Assigning a team leader (or facilitator) is essential in early intervention programs. Using a team decision-making process whenever possible, however, is a critical factor in team innovation (i.e., pursuit, assimilation, and implementation of new ideas). A team leader who has skills in group facilitation will most likely result in a self-managing team having short decision times, self-implemented accountability strategies, and enhanced flexibility and efficiency. Teams with much self-management also result in less need for a multitude of supervisory or middle-management positions. For example, an early intervention team that self-manages decisions related to the date, time, and length of team meetings will, in most cases, have enhanced participation and efficiency.

Characteristics of Effective Team Members

Effective teams consist of individuals who are agreeable, are conscientious, have high general mental ability, are competent in their area of expertise, are high in openness to experience and mental stability, like teamwork, and have been with the organization long enough to be socialized or acculturated to the written and unwritten rules or norms (Bell, 2004). Being an agreeable team member is identified as an important characteristic of practitioners working together in early childhood. The term agreeable when used to describe effective team members is synonymous with being flexible, courteous, trusting, and respectful. The term respectful or the phrase "demonstrating mutual respect" is pervasive across many studies (Bell, 2004; DeGangi, Wietlisbach, Poisson, Stein, & Royeen, 1994; Dinnebeil, Hale, & Rule, 1996, 1999; Dunst & Trivette, 2009; Dunst, Trivette, & Johanson, 1994; Harrison, Lynch, Rosander, & Borton, 1990; Lowenthal, 1992; O'Connor, 1995; Park & Turnbull, 2003; Soodak & Erwin, 2000). Agreeableness should not be confused with serving as a "rubber stamp" for other team members' ideas and recommendations. Team members will disagree; however, effective teams are able to reach consensus and move forward in supporting the team's decision.
         Conscientious team members are described as reliable, responsible, punctual, and organized. Studies in early childhood intervention repeatedly recognize this characteristic as a critical trait for practitioners (Bell, 2004; DeGangi et al., 1994; Dinnebeil et al., 1999; Dunst et al., 1994; Lowenthal, 1992; O'Connor, 1995; Park & Turnbull, 2003; Soodak & Erwin, 2000). For example, being prepared, organized, and mindful of the topics to be discussed at a home visit or team meeting is a clear way of demonstrating conscientious behavior so that scheduled conversations and visits do not exceed the planned time and do not negatively affect the timeliness of subsequent visits or meetings.
         Teams are more effective when the individual members have high general mental ability; in other words, the team is comprised of smart people (Bell, 2004). The team as a whole is only as strong as the weakest team member. Team members must be able to think on their feet, make quick and effective decisions, and possess knowledge and skills beyond the content expected of a particular discipline. For example, an SLP working in early intervention is expected to contribute knowledge and expertise related to communication development. The SLP must also understand global child development from many perspectives when working on a team in early intervention in order to learn from and support other team members and caregivers. Team members who are viewed as not having the knowledge or skills needed to complement the collective knowledge of the team can become marginalized and not sought out as a resource by other team members, potentially limiting the effectiveness of the team.
         The characteristic of team member competence in his or her area of expertise is referenced across a number of studies (Bell, 2004; DeGangi et al., 1994; Dinnebeil et al., 1996, 1999; Dunst & Trivette, 2009; Dunst et al., 1994; Harrison et al., 1990; Lowenthal, 1992; O'Connor, 1995; Park & Turnbull, 2003; Soodak & Erwin, 2000). Early intervention teams using a PSP approach must consist of members representing a variety of disciplines because they have specialized training and often licensing or credentialing in a particular area of expertise or knowledge. Using practitioners who have recently graduated from preservice training programs is consistent with this characteristic. New graduates may lack experience, but bring a fresh perspective, new energy, and the most up-to-date practices based on current research. In recent years, an increased accountability for practitioner competence related to evidence-based practice has been emphasized not only to ensure the highest probability of achievement of desired outcomes, but also as a consumer protection factor. Families enroll in early childhood programs and partner with practitioners because they trust and presume that needed or desired experiences and knowledge are available. They believe that the team members have expertise, knowledge, experience, and or skills that will benefit them in ways that enhance their success in supporting the young children in their care. Competence and knowledge of early childhood development, family support, and adult learning are critical components for practitioners from every discipline associated with the field. Monitoring of required competencies is necessary at every level by individual practitioners, programs, agencies, and oversight systems to ensure that parents have not misplaced their trust or made false presumptions about the type and quality of support that is available.
         The characteristics of openness to experience and mental stability of each team member are critical when supporting families and other team members in early intervention. A team member who is open to experience might be described as imaginative, objective, adaptable, innovative, and open minded. Openness to viewing new experiences as learning opportunities is specifically identified as an effective characteristic of team members. In studies conducted in early childhood intervention, factors related to openness and mental or emotional stability were reported across a number of studies examining effective practitioner–parent interactions (DeGangi et al., 1994; Dinnebeil et al., 1996; Dunst & Trivette, 2009; Dunst et al., 1994; Lowenthal, 1992; O'Connor, 1995; Park & Turnbull, 2003; Soodak & Erwin, 2000).
         Although the characteristic of "likes teamwork" may seem like an obvious statement, not every practitioner does. Working in isolation is often perceived to be faster, less stressful, and easier to some practitioners. Teamwork requires considering the perspectives of other team members, acknowledging different learning styles, building and maintaining relationships, and recognizing that an independent practitioner does not have all of the knowledge and skills necessary to appropriately support any child and family. Liking and respecting teamwork means that the individual practitioner believes the team's knowledge is always better than any one team member working alone.
         Effective team members are socialized to the organization's culture. Every team has its own way of being and doing. The amount of time a team member spends in a particular environment or setting determines how he or she practices. For example, if a practitioner spends most of his or her time in a hospital setting and contracts a few hours each week with an early intervention program, then his or her dominant culture will most likely be that of the hospital. The early intervention team will need to make time to assist this individual in becoming acculturated and socialized to early intervention practices and team functioning. This culture may be disrupted whenever a member joins or leaves the team. The remaining members must ensure that the team is not swayed to the incoming member's culture or allow the team's culture to disintegrate or depart with the exiting team member.
         The amount of time committed to the team and the longevity of team membership are particularly important when considering using consistent teams for children and their families in early intervention. This is especially true for those states using broker-type systems and vendors from a multitude of agencies in which providers contract for an hour here or there in addition to their "real job" (Dunst & Bruder, 2006; Sloper, 2004; Sloper, Mukherjee, Beresford, Lightfoot, & Norris, 1999; Sloper & Turner, 1992). Team members should be assigned to a consistent team so they can identify readily who is on their team. The system must be able to support these teams to minimize turnover, maximize involvement time, and promote long-term membership. Socialization and acculturation to the team and the use of research- based practices is more likely when team members do not rotate or change frequently. This socialization-acculturation effect (Bell, 2004; Borrill et al., 2001; West et al., 2002) is one of the most positive benefits of implementing a PSP approach to teaming. The approach adds an inherent check and balance among team members, a heightened sense of responsibility, and programmatic accountability regarding the overall quality of supports and services for all families enrolled in the program.

Primary Service Provider as Team Liaison to Family

Selecting one team member to serve as the liaison to the family and child is ...

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Book Description Brookes Publishing. Paperback. Condition: New. 264 pages. Dimensions: 10.9in. x 8.4in. x 0.7in.Early childhood professionals: looking for an effective way to ensure coordinated, family-centered services for young children and families Discover the why and how of the primary service provider (PSP) approach to teaming, the widely used, evidence-based model that more and more states are adopting to strengthen care and services and improve family outcomes. Developed by the early childhood experts who pioneered the PSP approach to teaming, this is the first how-to guide that clearly lays out the logistics and benefits of making one team member the consistent point of contact with a family. Youll get concrete, practical guidance on how toensure buy-in and support from program leaders and team members establish a cohesive team that collaborates effectively fully introduce families to the procedures and practices of the PSP approach develop family-focused and child-focused IFSP outcome statements select the most appropriate primary service provider for each family master the three essential components of a successful home visit adopt a flexible, activity-based approach to scheduling that promotes child learning and development coordinate joint visits with other service providers conduct successful, efficient team meetings to share expertise and resourcesRealistic case studies and transcripts from team meetings give you vivid demonstrations of best practices. And the photocopiable forms, tools, and checklistssuch as Role Expectation Checklist; Sample Early Intervention Program Brochure; Sample IFSP; and Joint Visit Planning Toolguide your team every step of the way as you implement the PSP approach. The perfect complement to the authors bestselling Early Childhood Coaching Handbook, this practical, reader-friendly guide is your blueprint for better, more responsive care and servicesand better outcomes for young children and families. A featured book in our Effective Early Intervention Kit! This item ships from multiple locations. Your book may arrive from Roseburg,OR, La Vergne,TN. Paperback. Seller Inventory # 9781598570854

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