The Rough Guide to Tenerife & La Gomera 1 (Rough Guide Mini Guides)

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9781858286655: The Rough Guide to Tenerife & La Gomera 1 (Rough Guide Mini Guides)
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INTRODUCTION

Despite its predictably sunny weather and the wide variety of landscapes that attract millions of tourists every year, Tenerife has a bit of an image problem, thanks largely to the attentions of the package tourism industry. As a result the entire island is commonly, though rather mistakenly, assumed to be just a playground for the hordes of rowdy, booze-fuelled holiday-makers looking for sun, sea and often sex in the island’s large resorts, particularly Playa de las Américas. And though most visitors largely content themselves with lazy days on the beach, there are plenty of opportunities to be more active and go surfing, windsurfing, sailing, diving or deep-sea fishing.

Tenerife first established itself as a holiday destination over a century ago when it became a fashionable place for the aristocracy of Europe to spend the winter months. Since then, but particularly in the last fifty years, during which time mass-tourism has become a major global industry, the numbers of holiday-makers have vastly increased. Today the island gets over four million annual visitors who, together with the thousands of northern Europeans settling here, have significantly changed the personality of the island.

Though commonly viewed by independent travellers as an aesthetic and social curse that has distorted the cultural landscape and cloaked vast areas in concrete, mass tourism has also guaranteed plentiful and excellent services in the resorts towns and cheap flights to the island. And if the resort honey-pots aren’t to your taste, you’ll find that it’s easy to leave the mass of holiday-makers behind. Despite the compactness of the island that puts most areas of the island within an easy day trip of its resorts you won’t find many other foreigners in the island’s vibrant, unpretentious and distinctly Canarian urban centres and only a small stream of hikers in its mountainous regions. Here it’s easy to find great quiet hiking trails, a couple of good climbing areas, as well as some quiet (though hilly) backroads and dirt roads for cycling and mountain biking. And for those wanting to get even further from the humdrum, there’s the option of heading out to hike or bike on the strikingly precipitous and laid-back nearby island of La Gomera.

AROUND THE ISLANDS

For a small island, only 86km long and 56km wide, Tenerife has a startling range and number of distinct ecological zones arising from the island’s mountainous topography which is dominated by a huge and barren volcanic backbone centre on Mount Teide. The island’s mountains stand in the way of prevailing cool northerly trade winds, forcing them to condense as cloud and bringing moisture to the island and keeping its northern side damp and green, while having little effect on the southern side – which is left to bake in the sun.

At the northeast end of the island the capital and largest city, Santa Cruz, is at the heart of a large sprawling urban area that also encompasses the old university town La Laguna, and houses around half of the island’s population of 650,000. Preventing the expansion of this urban area further north is the steep, wildly rugged, forested and impenetrable Anaga region where modern infrastructure has only recently arrived to its remote villages which remain great gateways for quiet hikes through the area’s mist-smothered laurel forests or along its beautiful unspoilt rocky coastline.

There are more good hikes through the thick forest of Canarian pines on the north side of the island. This is at its thickest on the old volcanic ridges surrounding the island’s most verdant region, the heavily populated, fertile, terraced and thickly planted Orotava valley, where the island’s first resort, the stylish Puerto de la Cruz, became fashionable over a century ago.

Further west along the coast pines give way to the deforested dry, rocky and steep-sided Teno massif, an ancient volcanic area. And though there’s more good hiking here, the area is best known for the presence of the giant cliffs Los Gigantes, from which a quiet neighbouring resort has taken its name.

Like the African continent only 300km to the east, the island’s southern side is dry and dusty. Only a few hardy shrubs and cacti can take hold in this sun-baked desert, although the ubiquitous sunshine has resulted in the construction, from scratch, of the lion’s share of Tenerife’s big resorts. Lining the coasts of the south and attracting thousands of tourists are Playa de Las Américas, Los Cristianos and the Costa del Silencio – strings of hotels, restaurants and bars, many of which line the island’s major (artificial) beaches.

A much more stunning and memorable island landscape, though equally barren, is that around its central volcanic plateau. The massive 3,718m volcano Mount Teide, the highest point on Spanish territory and symbol of the island, is at the centre of this region and surrounded by Las Cañadas, a vast beautiful tree-less volcanic wasteland containing gnarled and twisted lava contortions which are protected as a national park.

There’s another national park on Tenerife’s closest neighbour in the Canarian archipelago, the small round and much less visited island of La Gomera, 28km away. But in complete contrast to Tenerife’s national park the Parque Nacional de Garajonay, a UNESCO world heritage site, is a haven for the world’s premium remaining deep green and misty laurel forest. Also in contrast to Tenerife, the resorts in La Gomera are remarkably small-scale.

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About the Author:

Christian Williams is a writer and journalist who has mountain biked and skied in Colorado for almost a decade, while managing to squeeze in work on several books along the way. These have included The Rough Guide to the Rocky Mountains and The Rough Guide to Skiing and Snowboarding. He has also written books and articles about Canada, Tenerife, Austria, and his hometown, Berlin.

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CLIMATE AND WHEN TO GO

For islands at this latitude, level with Morocco 300km to the west, their climate is generally milder than you’d expect - mainly thanks to the northeast trade winds – but also because of the cool Canary current in the surrounding Atlantic ocean. As a result the variation around the islands is marked and since there is only relatively minimal seasonal change the choice of where to go tends to be as important as when.

Winds and currents have the greatest effect on climate on the north side of the island, where northern slopes catch cool trade winds, forming a cloud base that results in less sunshine, more rain and cooler temperatures than at the southern end of the island. The only wind that affects the south is an occasional hot, dry, gentle and dusty Calima blowing from the Sahara – sometimes for days at a time. The climatic table below summarises variation around the island using data from the coastal resorts of Puerto Cruz in the north and Los Cristianos in the south. This pattern of variation also exists on La Gomera which, though tending to be a little cooler all round than Tenerife, also has a colder, wetter north and sunnier, drier south. Moving inland from the coast to higher ground on both islands, temperatures become progressively cooler, with Mount Teide often experiencing freezing temperatures and occasionally snow cover.

So, holiday-makers intent on spending time on sunny beaches would do best to stay in the south of either island at any time of year, while those seeking an active holiday in the summer, would be best off in the cooler north. Spring (March–May) is a particularly pleasant time for outdoor activities since many endemic species flower at this time.

Thus, with remarkably little variation year round in the weather conditions in the Canaries, the peak times for tourists to visit reflect the weather conditions back home rather than on the islands. Thus, the busiest times to visit – and in contrast to resorts on the Spanish mainland – are from mid-December to February, when many northern Europeans are keen to escape long and dreary winters. The islands are also popular at Easter and during summer holidays (June–Sept) when the nightlife in the resorts gets particularly busy and numbers are further bolstered by visitors from the Spanish mainland, arriving to escape the heat of their plains. There’s a slight low season between these times (March, May, Oct & Nov) – with the notable exception of the carnival period (Feb or March), when Santa Cruz is at its busiest; an excellent time to catch the island’s native nightlife in full swing.

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