House and Home 1850-1870: The Homemaker's Helper (Dictionary of Every-Day Wants Series)

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9781889023014: House and Home 1850-1870: The Homemaker's Helper (Dictionary of Every-Day Wants Series)
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EGGS, To Preserve. 1. For each patent pail full of water put in one pint of fresh slaked lime, and one pint of common salt, mix well, fill your barrel about half full of this fluid, then with a dish, let your fresh eggs down into this, and they will settle down right side up with care every time, and we can assure any one who will try it, that they will keep any reasonable length of time without any further care than to keep them covered with the fluid. Eggs may be laid down in this way any time after June. 2. Eggs may be preserved by keeping them buried in salt, or dipping them during two or three minutes in boiling water. The white of the egg then forms a kind of membrane, which envelops the interior, and defends it from the air. 3. The week before going to sea on a four months' voyage, I gathered in sixty dozen eggs for cabin sea-stores, taking especial pains to prove every egg of the lot a good one; besides, I got them from my farmer friends, and know they were all fresh. Then I fixed them for keeping, by taking five or six dozen at a time in a basket, and dipping them about five seconds in the cook's "copper" of boiling water. After scalding, I passed the eggs through a bath, made by dissolving about five pounds of the cheapest brown sugar in a gallon of water, and laid them out on the galley floor to dry. There I had my sixty dozen eggs sugar-coated. I packed them in charcoal dust instead of salt; I tried salt ten years, and I don't believe it preserves eggs a mite. The steward had strict orders to report every bad egg he should find. During the voyage he brought three, not absolutely spoiled, but a little old like. All the others, or what was left of them, were as fresh when we came in as they were when I packed them away. 4. A Parisian paper recommends the following method for the preservation of eggs: Dissolve four ounces of beeswax in eight ounces of warm olive oil, in this put the tip of the finger and anoint the egg all round. The oil will immediately be absorbed, and the shell and pores filled up by the wax. If kept in a cool place the eggs, after two years, will be as good as if fresh laid. 5. Take of quick lime one pound; salt, one pound; saltpetre, three ounces; water, one gallon. It is necessary that the solution be boiled ten or fifteen minutes, and when cold put in the eggs, small end downward, using a vessel lined with lead, and placing in a cold but dry cellar. 6. Dip them into a solution of gun cotton (collodion), so as to exclude the air from the pores of the shell; or the collodion may be applied with a brush. 7. A writer recommends the dissolving of gum shellac in alcohol, when the mixture may be applied with a common paint-brush. When dry, pack in bran, points downward. Eggs so preserved will keep a very long time. When about to be used, the varnish may be washed off. 8. Get a good sweet wooden box, put in an inch of salt on the bottom; take sweet grease of any kind, lard or drippings, rub the eggs all over with it and put them, the little end down, in the salt; then spread a layer of salt and then add more eggs. 9. Pack the eggs in a cask with the smaller end downward; and fill up the cask with melted tallow. This method is practiced very extensively in Russia and in other part of Europe, and is generally successful. 10. Keep them at the temperature of 40 or less in a refrigerator. Specimens had been exhibited, which were fourteen months old, and still perfectly fresh and sweet. 11. Apply with a brush a solution of gum arabic to the shells, or immerse the eggs therein; let them dry, and afterwards pack them in dry charcoal dust. This prevents their being affected by any alteration of temperature. 12. Of all the materials that have been recommended for this purpose, water glass, or silicate of soda, is the most effectual and least objectionable. EGGS, To Dry. The eggs are beaten to uniform consistency, and spread out in thin cakes on batter plates. This dries them into a paste, which is to be packed in close cans and sealed. When required for use, the paste can be dissolved in water, and beaten to a foam like fresh eggs. It is said that eggs can be preserved for years in this way and retain their flavor. EGGS, Pickling. At the season of the year when the stock of eggs is plentiful, cause some four or six dozen to be boiled in a capacious saucepan until they become quite hard. Then, after removing the shells, lay them carefully in large mouthed jars, and pour over them scalding vinegar, well seasoned with whole pepper, allspice, a few races of ginger, and a few cloves of garlic. When cold they are bunged down close, and in a month are fit for use. Where eggs are plentiful, the above pickle is by no means expensive, and as an acetic accompaniment to cold meat, it can not be outrivaled. EGGS, Portable. Take fresh laid eggs, any quantity, break them into an evaporating basin, and expose them to a heat of 125Fahr. in a water-bath, until hard, then pack them in airtight vessels. For use, take cold water, 3 parts, dried egg, 1 part. Beat them well together.

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Hamilton, Katie F., Youman, Alexander E.
Published by Metheglin Pr (2001)
ISBN 10: 1889023019 ISBN 13: 9781889023014
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