Sin, Impurity, Sacrifice, Atonement: The Priestly Conceptions (Hebrew Bible Monographs)

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9781905048120: Sin, Impurity, Sacrifice, Atonement: The Priestly Conceptions (Hebrew Bible Monographs)

The goal of this closely reasoned study is to explain why, in Priestly texts of the Hebrew Bible, the verb kipper, traditionally translated 'atone', means the way of dealing both with sin and with impurity-which might seem very different things. Sklar's first key conclusion is that when the context is sin, certain sins also pollute; so 'atonement' may include some element of purification. His second conclusion is that, when the context is impurity, and kipper means not 'atone' but 'effect purgation', impurity also endangers; so kipper can include some element of ransoming. The goal of this closely reasoned study is to explain why, in Priestly texts of the Hebrew Bible, the verb kipper, traditionally translated 'atone', means the way of dealing both with sin and with impurity-which might seem very different things. Sklar's first key conclusion is that when the context is sin, certain sins also pollute; so 'atonement' may include some element of purification. His second conclusion is that, when the context is impurity, and kipper means not 'atone' but 'effect purgation', impurity also endangers; so kipper can include some element of ransoming. The goal of this closely reasoned study is to explain why, in Priestly texts of the Hebrew Bible, the verb kipper, traditionally translated 'atone', means the way of dealing both with sin and with impurity-which might seem very different things. Sklar's first key conclusion is that when the context is sin, certain sins also pollute; so 'atonement' may include some element of purification. His second conclusion is that, when the context is impurity, and kipper means not 'atone' but 'effect purgation', impurity also endangers; so kipper can include some element of ransoming. In fact, sin and impurity, while distinct categories in themselves, have this in common: each of them requires both ransoming and purification. It is for this reason that kipper can be used in both settings. This benchmark study concludes with a careful examination of the famous sentence of Leviticus 17.11 that 'blood makes atonement' (kipper) and explains how, in the Priestly ideology, blood sacrifice was able to accomplish both ransom and purification. In fact, sin and impurity, while distinct categories in themselves, have this in common: each of them requires both ransoming and purification. It is for this reason that kipper can be used in both settings. This benchmark study concludes with a careful examination of the famous sentence of Leviticus 17.11 that 'blood makes atonement' (kipper) and explains how, in the Priestly ideology, blood sacrifice was able to accomplish both ransom and purification. In fact, sin and impurity, while distinct categories in themselves, have this in common: each of them requires both ransoming and purification. It is for this reason that kipper can be used in both settings. This benchmark study concludes with a careful examination of the famous sentence of Leviticus 17.11 that 'blood makes atonement' (kipper) and explains how, in the Priestly ideology, blood sacrifice was able to accomplish both ransom and purification.

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About the Author:

Jay Sklar (Ph.D., University of Gloucestershire) is professor of Old Testament and dean of faculty at Covenant Seminary, St. Louis, Missouri.

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Sklar's presentation ... is clear, precise, and concise, serving as an effective vehicle for unfolding his tight reasoning concerning a complex topic... Although Sklar's study is focused on a narrow question (Why does kipper occur in contexts of sin and impurity?), the answer he provides has far-reaching implications for the conceptual cohesion of the Israelite expiatory system and its theological meaning...Henceforth, any serious study of Israelite cult or atonement must take Sklar's work into account. Roy Gane, Review of Biblical Literature

[A] benchmark study full of detailed exegetical observations ... will be important for all exegetical studies that want to shed light on the concepts of ancient Israelite priestly theology. Reinhard Achenbach, Review of Biblical Literature

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Book Description Sheffield Phoenix Press, United Kingdom, 2005. Hardback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. The goal of this closely reasoned study is to explain why, in Priestly texts of the Hebrew Bible, the verb kipper, traditionally translated atone , means the way of dealing both with sin and with impurity-which might seem very different things. Sklar s first key conclusion is that when the context is sin, certain sins also pollute; so atonement may include some element of purification. His second conclusion is that, when the context is impurity, and kipper means not atone but effect purgation , impurity also endangers; so kipper can include some element of ransoming. The goal of this closely reasoned study is to explain why, in Priestly texts of the Hebrew Bible, the verb kipper, traditionally translated atone , means the way of dealing both with sin and with impurity-which might seem very different things. Sklar s first key conclusion is that when the context is sin, certain sins also pollute; so atonement may include some element of purification. His second conclusion is that, when the context is impurity, and kipper means not atone but effect purgation , impurity also endangers; so kipper can include some element of ransoming. The goal of this closely reasoned study is to explain why, in Priestly texts of the Hebrew Bible, the verb kipper, traditionally translated atone , means the way of dealing both with sin and with impurity-which might seem very different things. Sklar s first key conclusion is that when the context is sin, certain sins also pollute; so atonement may include some element of purification. His second conclusion is that, when the context is impurity, and kipper means not atone but effect purgation , impurity also endangers; so kipper can include some element of ransoming. In fact, sin and impurity, while distinct categories in themselves, have this in common: each of them requires both ransoming and purification. It is for this reason that kipper can be used in both settings. This benchmark study concludes with a careful examination of the famous sentence of Leviticus 17.11 that blood makes atonement (kipper) and explains how, in the Priestly ideology, blood sacrifice was able to accomplish both ransom and purification. In fact, sin and impurity, while distinct categories in themselves, have this in common: each of them requires both ransoming and purification. It is for this reason that kipper can be used in both settings. This benchmark study concludes with a careful examination of the famous sentence of Leviticus 17.11 that blood makes atonement (kipper) and explains how, in the Priestly ideology, blood sacrifice was able to accomplish both ransom and purification. In fact, sin and impurity, while distinct categories in themselves, have this in common: each of them requires both ransoming and purification. It is for this reason that kipper can be used in both settings. This benchmark study concludes with a careful examination of the famous sentence of Leviticus 17.11 that blood makes atonement (kipper) and explains how, in the Priestly ideology, blood sacrifice was able to accomplish both ransom and purification. Bookseller Inventory # APC9781905048120

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Book Description Sheffield Phoenix Press, United Kingdom, 2005. Hardback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.The goal of this closely reasoned study is to explain why, in Priestly texts of the Hebrew Bible, the verb kipper, traditionally translated atone , means the way of dealing both with sin and with impurity-which might seem very different things. Sklar s first key conclusion is that when the context is sin, certain sins also pollute; so atonement may include some element of purification. His second conclusion is that, when the context is impurity, and kipper means not atone but effect purgation , impurity also endangers; so kipper can include some element of ransoming. The goal of this closely reasoned study is to explain why, in Priestly texts of the Hebrew Bible, the verb kipper, traditionally translated atone , means the way of dealing both with sin and with impurity-which might seem very different things. Sklar s first key conclusion is that when the context is sin, certain sins also pollute; so atonement may include some element of purification. His second conclusion is that, when the context is impurity, and kipper means not atone but effect purgation , impurity also endangers; so kipper can include some element of ransoming. The goal of this closely reasoned study is to explain why, in Priestly texts of the Hebrew Bible, the verb kipper, traditionally translated atone , means the way of dealing both with sin and with impurity-which might seem very different things. Sklar s first key conclusion is that when the context is sin, certain sins also pollute; so atonement may include some element of purification. His second conclusion is that, when the context is impurity, and kipper means not atone but effect purgation , impurity also endangers; so kipper can include some element of ransoming. In fact, sin and impurity, while distinct categories in themselves, have this in common: each of them requires both ransoming and purification. It is for this reason that kipper can be used in both settings. This benchmark study concludes with a careful examination of the famous sentence of Leviticus 17.11 that blood makes atonement (kipper) and explains how, in the Priestly ideology, blood sacrifice was able to accomplish both ransom and purification. In fact, sin and impurity, while distinct categories in themselves, have this in common: each of them requires both ransoming and purification. It is for this reason that kipper can be used in both settings. This benchmark study concludes with a careful examination of the famous sentence of Leviticus 17.11 that blood makes atonement (kipper) and explains how, in the Priestly ideology, blood sacrifice was able to accomplish both ransom and purification. In fact, sin and impurity, while distinct categories in themselves, have this in common: each of them requires both ransoming and purification. It is for this reason that kipper can be used in both settings. This benchmark study concludes with a careful examination of the famous sentence of Leviticus 17.11 that blood makes atonement (kipper) and explains how, in the Priestly ideology, blood sacrifice was able to accomplish both ransom and purification. Bookseller Inventory # APC9781905048120

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Book Description Sheffield Phoenix Press Ltd. Hardcover. Book Condition: New. Hardcover. 228 pages. Dimensions: 9.3in. x 6.4in. x 0.6in.The goal of this closely reasoned study is to explain why, in Priestly texts of the Hebrew Bible, the verb kipper, traditionally translated atone, means the way of dealing both with sin and with impurity-which might seem very different things. Sklars first key conclusion is that when the context is sin, certain sins also pollute; so atonement may include some element of purification. His second conclusion is that, when the context is impurity, and kipper means not atone but effect purgation, impurity also endangers; so kipper can include some element of ransoming. The goal of this closely reasoned study is to explain why, in Priestly texts of the Hebrew Bible, the verb kipper, traditionally translated atone, means the way of dealing both with sin and with impurity-which might seem very different things. Sklars first key conclusion is that when the context is sin, certain sins also pollute; so atonement may include some element of purification. His second conclusion is that, when the context is impurity, and kipper means not atone but effect purgation, impurity also endangers; so kipper can include some element of ransoming. The goal of this closely reasoned study is to explain why, in Priestly texts of the Hebrew Bible, the verb kipper, traditionally translated atone, means the way of dealing both with sin and with impurity-which might seem very different things. Sklars first key conclusion is that when the context is sin, certain sins also pollute; so atonement may include some element of purification. His second conclusion is that, when the context is impurity, and kipper means not atone but effect purgation, impurity also endangers; so kipper can include some element of ransoming. In fact, sin and impurity, while distinct categories in themselves, have this in common: each of them requires both ransoming and purification. It is for this reason that kipper can be used in both settings. This benchmark study concludes with a careful examination of the famous sentence of Leviticus 17. 11 that blood makes atonement (kipper) and explains how, in the Priestly ideology, blood sacrifice was able to accomplish both ransom and purification. In fact, sin and impurity, while distinct categories in themselves, have this in common: each of them requires both ransoming and purification. It is for this reason that kipper can be used in both settings. This benchmark study concludes with a careful examination of the famous sentence of Leviticus 17. 11 that blood makes atonement (kipper) and explains how, in the Priestly ideology, blood sacrifice was able to accomplish both ransom and purification. In fact, sin and impurity, while distinct categories in themselves, have this in common: each of them requires both ransoming and purification. It is for this reason that kipper can be used in both settings. This benchmark study concludes with a careful examination of the famous sentence of Leviticus 17. 11 that blood makes atonement (kipper) and explains how, in the Priestly ideology, blood sacrifice was able to accomplish both ransom and purification. This item ships from multiple locations. Your book may arrive from Roseburg,OR, La Vergne,TN. Hardcover. Bookseller Inventory # 9781905048120

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