The Greening of Health and Well Being: Health and Health Care and Well Being in the Age of Green Economics

 
9781907543760: The Greening of Health and Well Being: Health and Health Care and Well Being in the Age of Green Economics
View all copies of this ISBN edition:
 
 

Looking ahead to 2015 "Ahead of the Sept 25 2015, The United Nations General Assembly, which will evaluate the efforts made towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals, and look ahead to the post-2015 Development Agenda, a special issue of The Lancet focuses on the Countdown to 2015. A new analysis of interventions to reduce maternal and child deaths in developing countries reveals that if current trends continue, just nine Countdown countries will meet internationally agreed targets to reduce the number of deaths of children under 5 to fewer than 20 deaths per 1000 births by 2035. " The Lancet 1.1 Introduction: Green Issues in Health today in the 21st century By Dr. Katherine Kennet, MBBS BSC. And Miriam Kennet Health, Healthcare, Health systems and the Well-being of the planet, nature, humans and other species are all essential aspects of a Green Economy. Economic, social and environmental justice all intersect at this critical point, as our species seeks to define the way forward, in terms of improving our standards of living, the human healthcare experience, and the best way to interact with the rest of our planet's species and nature itself.The Green Economics Institute first started to address this interconnected issue with its first Green Economics and Well Being Retreat which it held at the Earthspirit Centre near Glastonbury about 7 years ago. Over 100 people came to this event which had a guiding principle of Multiple Intelligences and the care and health of the whole person, forming the bedrock of any concept of health and well-being. Every aspect of a person is valued from a Green Economics Perspective. Additionally we recognise that the start people have in life can present serious challenges to health and well-being, much as the Marmot Review, a sort of Stern Review for Health, has just outlined. In November 2008, Professor Sir Michael Marmot was asked by the then Secretary of State for Health to chair an independent review to propose the most effective evidence-based strategies for reducing health inequalities in England from 2010. "The Report Fair Society, Health Lives, was published in February 2010, and concluded that reducing health inequalities would require action on six policy objectives: 1. Give every child the best start in life 2.Enable all children, young people and adults to maximise their capabilities and have control over their lives 3. Create fair employment and good work for all 4. Ensure healthy standard of living for all 5. Create and develop healthy and sustainable places and communities 6. Strengthen the role and impact of ill-health prevention. One of the authors was asked to speak in December 2012 to the North Western Area of the entire National Health Service of England to put forard suggestions as to how this could be implemented. Photos from the official MHS photographer for the event, which was held at Manchester United famous football stadium and was very well attended. We, Green Economists, also make the links and interconnections and even causality between Democracy, Economic Power, Wealth and health and Well Being as well. Poverty, as several chapters in this book explains, impacts on health outcomes negatively and therefore it is crucial to try to eliminate inequality and to increase equal and fair access to health for everyone.The Green Economics Institute is committed to trying its utmost to challenge inequality and to end the lack of access to health and resources so that everyone on the planet can realise their full potential unhampered by health issues and supported by free healthcare at the point of need. For example an case coming to International attention is the very low life expectancy in countries like Sierra Leone where it is only 41 years and the Health Service has all but disintegrated. Maternal and child mortality is the worst in the world and one in eight women die in childbirth often for lack of the most basic of amenities such as clean water or any experienced birth attendant or any hospital facilities and simply bleed to death. (BBC and Amnesty International Websites, acessed 26th September 2013). The cost of this injury to public health is very high and affects the whole economy. Hence as Green Economists we see this lack of investment in a significant part of the population as happening at the intersection of human rights, democracy, peace and investment. No woman in 2013 should be dying in routine childbirth.Our book also discusses how economic "growth" impacts on our own health and the health of our planet. How does our physical Well-Being result from the well-being and respectful interaction with our planet and with its other species, both plant and animal? Can we justify and where do we stand, on controversial issues such as factory farming, the obliteration of fish populations in the oceans, and the increased consumption of certain crops leading to deforestation? Are we conscious of or even concerned with, how these daily choices impact the global environmental crisis our planet is experiencing? How do social policies impact the way our human communities develop, and how can we ameliorate the prospects of the poorest and most marginalised among us? With 2015 looming on the horizon, to what extent have the Millennium Development Goals been successful, and what has our success-rate been towards the eradication of poverty and its resulting and related maladies?These questions and more are among the issues driving the discussion of Health, Healthcare, and Well-being from a Green Economics Perspective and we regard them all as linked together, indivisible inter related determinants of health outcomes, which we began to explore in our books -Green Economics and the Citizen's Income, Lord, Felton and Kennet (2012) and in Womens Unequal Pay and Poverty, (Kennet, Gale de Oliveira, Felton and Winchester. 2012) both of which books are influencing policy outcomes in some cases in governments and Ministers are using them to formulate government strategy. There are two main aspects that we might propose to be the most important health issues in the modern world. The first is the investment in seeking out new and technical solutions to illness we either don't understand, or just can't cure yet. The second, and in our opinion, far more interesting and green aspect of health care is the real quest for knowledge to inform us about how to deliver the skills, technology and medicines we already have, and in some cases have had for decades, to the people who need it.Distribution to people and access to health care is one of the biggest challenges of the 21st century. One c o - author of this paper, Dr Katherine Kennet, says that in her practise, around the world , she has seen whole hospitals without a single bar of soap. If you consider how in the developed world we know that the use of cleaning and disinfecting and even soap will be really effective barriers to infection spreading. Denying patients the rights to this basic level of technology is what really impacts global health outcomes. We have known for over a century that a l ack of basic sanitation is more than enough to kill vulnerable people and creating hygenic conditions is one of the most effective health care remedies. The newer, and greener, discipline of Global Health (The Lancet) looks at not just modern solutions to illness, but also considers the socio-economic s barriers to rolling out at any level the solutions we already have. A medical doctor's work is not always about modern science, pharmaceuticals and impressive and expensive machines.Rather , it is increasingly about our responsibility to care for our patients. As Hippocrates said, and all new doctors recite, "first do no harm." It is very moving to hear 300 new Medics reciting the Hippocratic Oath together as we recently did at Imperial College, London University and I think it is worth reminding readers what it says. Although some parts are clearly outdated, considering that it is 2300 years old it is remarkable in its relevance for us here. The Hippocratic Oath as amended by the British Medical Association in 1997 "The practice of medicine is a privilege which carries important responsibilities. All doctors should observe the core values of the profession which centre on the duty to help sick people and to avoid harm. I promise that my medical knowledge will be used to benefit people's health. They are my first concern. I will listen to them and provide the best care I can. I will be honest, respectful and compassionate towards patients. In emergencies, I will do my best to help anyone in medical need.I will make every effort to ensure that the rights of all patients are respected, including vulnerable groups who lack means of making their needs known, be it through immaturity, mental incapacity, imprisonment or detention or other circumstance. My professional judgement will be exercised as independently as possible and not be influenced by political pressures nor by factors such as the social standing of the patient. I will not put personal profit or advancement above my duty to patients. I recognise the special value of human life but I also know that the prolongation of human life is not the only aim of healthcare. Where abortion is permitted, I agree that it should take place only within an ethical and legal framework. I will not provide treatments which are pointless or harmful or which an informed and competent patient refuses. I will ensure patients receive the information and support they want to make decisions about disease prevention and improvement of their health. I will answer as truthfully as I can and respect patients' decisions unless that puts others at risk of harm. If I cannot agree with their requests, I will explain why.If my patients have limited mental awareness, I will still encourage them to participate in decisions as much as they feel able and willing to do so. I will do my best to maintain confidentiality about all patients. If there are overriding reasons which prevent my keeping a patient's confidentiality I will explain them. I will recognise the limits of my knowledge and seek advice from colleagues when necessary. I will acknowledge my mistakes. I will do my best to keep myself and colleagues informed of new developments and ensure that poor standards or bad practices are exposed to those who can improve them. I will show respect for all those with whom I work and be ready to share my knowledge by teaching others what I know. I will use my training and professional standing to improve the community in which I work. I will treat patients equitably and support a fair and humane distribution of health resources. I will try to influence positively authorities whose policies harm public health. I will oppose policies which breach internationally accepted standards of human rights. I will strive to change laws which are contrary to patients' interests or to my professional ethics."Environmental Health John Snow is usually regarded as the father of "Epidemiology " and he made the connection and discovered the relationship between the environment and health. He made his great discovery linking a fatal outbreak of cholera with a pump on Broad Street in Soho, London and there was an exhibition to commemorate his work, this year at the London School of Hygene and Tropical Medicine. The water, he realised, was contaminated by sewerage, making the local residents incredibly ill. This revelation, as recent as 1854, showed the scientific community that there was no escaping the link between environment, social infrastructure and health and how to spatially map the geography of diseases. The discipline of "Public Health " evolved over the years to become "International Health" and eventually arrived at its current incarnation of "Global Health" which now widens its scope to encompass a Health Systems approach, i.e. a view to healthcare which takes not just an ill patient into account, but it also considers the social and economic landscape which created the illness and also strives to find solutions to their current illnesses , and the prevention of future outbreaks of disease.Millenium Development Goals (MDGs of the United Nations Developmnt Programme) This issue of the lack of access to healthcare is today regarded as one the key obtsacles to development, in every sense. So much so, that the United Nations has made it a priority, with its famous 8 "M illenium Development Goals":1 1. To eradicate extreme poverty and hunger; 2. To achieve universal primary education; 3. To promote gender equality and empower women; 4. To reduce child mortality; 5. To improve maternal health; 6. To combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases; 7. To ensure environmental sustainability 8. To develop a global partnership for development. Helen Clark the Head of the United Nations Development Programme and who was a lecturer at a UK Government training course for women leaders which one of the current books co -authors taught on gave an interesting speech outlining how much progress has been made as a result of the focus provided by the MDGs. She spoke about, "There has undoubtedly been progress on many of the indicators targeted by the MDGs. The proportion of people living in extreme poverty, on under $1.25 per day, is now half of what it was in 1990. Good progress has been registered on access to improved water sources. The world is within reach of seeing every child enrolled in primary school, and has achieved parity in primary education between girls and boys. Some of the lowest income countries have made the greatest strides. Considerable progress has also been made on MDG Six on HIV/AIDS, malaria, and TB. Alas, there are also the goals and targets where too little progress has been made - for example on maternal mortality reduction, universal access to reproductive health, and improved sanitation." She outlined the aim to be: Accelerating MDG progress in the last 1000 days "Despite the progress made on the MDGs, those major challenges remain: reducing hunger and undernourishment, poor sanitation, and high maternal death rates have proved to be among the most difficult targets to attain. As well, aggregate figures on MDG progress mask large disparities within and across countries - a matter which groups like those representing people with disabilities are emphasizing in the post-2015 consultations."Helen advised in her speech that we will still in 2015 need to acknowledge that "By 2015 almost 1 billion people will still live in extreme poverty. Many still will not have clean water or improved sanitation. Many will still be suffering from hunger, malnutrition, the burden of preventable ill-health, gender discrimination, and more. Whether or not global MDG targets are met, such suffering is inconsistent with the vision for dignity, equity, freedom, peace, and prosperity of the Millennium Declaration." And it's not just the 191 UN member states who feel these subjects are key to address. The Lancet , one of the world's leading health journals, has become a specialised Global Health journal because Professionals feel its so important. The Royal Society of Medicine in London started an annual Global Health Conference in 2012. Its inaugural meeting was on child and maternal health and its second was on the global burden of psychiatric disease. Both these topics are not found in mainstream economics or medicine and we think it's worth exploring why.They are both 'unfashionable' and don't fit with the traditional Marxist view of development and nor do they fit with traditional economists' view s, which are often quoted as being those of the views of " rational economic man", " homo economicus. " These issues were swept under the carpet, or treated in novels as an object of terror in the attic like Bertha Mason the wife of Mr Rochester in the famous novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte (1847) or or people were st...

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

About the Author:

The authors are experienced in Green Economics and their aim is to promote and create health rather than medicating people who become ill! One is Doctor to Prince Charles and Head of the College of Physicians and one is a Doctor specialising in Global Health from Imperial College, London one of the most prestigious colleges in the world, who has been working on health care in Nepal. The other is a well known speaker and who has just spoken at Manchester United Football Ground, and in the Scottish Parliament and in many governments and parliaments. She has been increasingly asked to speak about the impact of green economics on health, well being and care - and how it could seriously improve matters. So she has decided to put this book together after receiving many requests for it. She is a member of Mansfield College Oxford University and the Environmental Change Institute Oxford University and also founded the Green Economics Institute. She is founder and editor of the International Journal of Green Economics: one of the worlds only green academic journals which has been running for 8 years and she is author and or editor of 15 books and 100s of published articles,book chapters and papers and a regular speaker all over the world.

Review:

List of Contributors Sofia Amaral is at NOVA School of Business and Economics, Portugal. Her field of interests include green economics and sustainable management. She is the lead editor of the Green Economics series book Green Economics: Reforming and Transforming the Global Economy. She specialises in looking at alternatives from around the world and how to avoid the stress of debt and poverty in Southern European Countries. Kanupriya Bhagat, is at the University of St Andrews. Originally, from Agra, India, she has been involved with organizations such as CRY (Child Rights and You), New Delhi, where she was part of the Digital Fundraising Department, and has a strong interest in publishing to help in this work. She enjoys collaborating with the Green Economics Institute in developing green economics into a global initiative. She is also concerned with women's safety on public transport. Professor Dr Vinca Bigo (France and the UK) )qualified at Cambridge University and is a Professor of Gender, Ethics & Leadership at the Kedge Business School in Marseille in France. She has published regularly with the Green Economics Institute and in its academic journal and her work theorises dilemmas of care and how we can change our conventional understanding of it to a model with is more inclusive and beneficial to the whole community. Rose Blackett-Ord is a graduate of Oxford University and Le Cordon Bleu. She now works as a freelance chef and writer, and has a particular interest in rural and green issues relating to food. Her work includes local, seasonal and wild food recipes for health. Rose writes green and gourmet recipes for a number of publications, including for the Green Economics Institute, where she co-edited a number of books, including the Greening of Food, Farming and Agriculture and the Greening of Poetry and the Arts which looks at how to obtain health and well being. Alan Cunningham trained in Public Administration and has worked as an Administrative and an Information officer. Following early retirement for family reasons, he has served on two regional working parties for public health campaigning for local action on health inequalities, the better application of public health policy by NGOs, and for recognition of the links between Public Health Practice and Sustainable Living. He has developed a local area profiling system that has been praised by MPs and by Health Observatory staff. He is an associate member of the Faculty of Public Health and of IUHPE. Professor Dr Graciela Chichilnisky PhD has worked extensively in the Kyoto Protocol process, creating and designing the carbon market that became international law in 2005. She also acted as a lead author of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which received the 2007 Nobel Prize. A frequent keynote speaker, special adviser to several UN organisations and heads of state, her pioneering work uses innovative market mechanisms to reduce carbon emissions, conserve biodiversity and ecosystem services and improve the lot of the poor. She is a Professor of Economics and Mathematical Statistics at Columbia University and the Sir Louis Matheson Distinguished Professor at Monash University. Chit Chong, has been an environmental campaigner and environmental professional for over two decades. He has been a member of the Green Economics Institute since it started. He was the first Green Councillor to be elected in London and is now a member of the Alliance for Future Generations which seeks to promote the representation of future generations in the decision making processes of today. He works as an environmental consultant helping organisations and individuals to reduce their emissions from their buildings. www.LowCarbonKnowHow.co.uk W. Thomas Duncanson, Ph.D.,(Australia) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication at Millikin University in Decatur, Illinois, USA. His research and writing has focused on the "speech thought" of Eugen Rosenstock-Huessy, as well as issues of communication ethics and public moral argument. In recent years Duncanson has written primarily about environmental advocacy and economic rhetoric. David Flint is a Senior Visiting Fellow at the Cass Business School, London and specialises in Healthcare as an advisor and as a trustee of the British Pregnancy Advisory Service, and was founding chairman of Education For Choice, originally a charity providing educational resources relating to abortion and birth control and now part of Brook. He has spent thirty years studying Information Technology and its application and interpreting his findings for senior managers in business and public service. He has written two books and a great many reports, advised hundreds of organisations and lectured on four continents. Christopher Fleming is a Director of Griffith University's Social and Economic Research Program (SERP), a Lecturer at Griffith Business School in the Department of Accounting, Finance and Economics, a founding member of Griffith University's Asia-Pacific Centre for Sustainable Enterprise, a member of the Key Centre for Ethics, Law, Justice and Governance, and a Senior Associate of MainStream Economics and Policy. An applied micro-economist with teaching, consulting and public policy experience, Christopher's research and consulting interests include, social and economic project/program evaluation, natural resource and environmental economics, the economic determinants of subjective well-being, the economics of crime, the sustainable management of natural resources and the economics of sustainable tourism. Prior to joining Griffith Business School, Christopher worked as a senior consultant for Marsden Jacob Associates and as a senior advisor within the Sustainable Development Policy Group of the New Zealand Ministry for the Environment. Christopher holds a Bachelor of Arts (Economics) from the University of Otago, a Master of Applied Economics with first class honours from Massey University and a PhD (Economics) from the University of Queensland. Eli Gregory explored how the Kibbutz system creates feeling of community and how this leads to well being. He was a Kibbutz Lotan volunteer and CfCE Professor Dr Sandra Gusta is an Associate Professor, Doctor of Social Sciences in Economy at the Latvian University of Agriculture, Department Architecture and Building (Latvia), member of the Board of LEA (Latvian Association of Economics), and a Member of the Latvian Association of Civil Engineers, Education and Science section and examines health projects in Latvia. Volker Heinemann is an economist who studied at the Universities of Goettingen, Kiel and Nottingham. He is a specialist in international and developing economics, monetary economics and macroeconomic theory and policy. He is author of the book "Die Oekonomie der Zukunft," "The Economy of the Future," a book outlining a green structure for a contemporary economy that accepts the pressing changes that are needed to outdated current economic thinking. He is co-founder and Director and CFO of the Green Economics Institute, a member of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales, trained at PWC and other major Institutions and is a Deputy Editor of the International Journal of Green Economics. He is a popular radio and TV speaker in Europe and a former Die Gruenen Councillor. He was on the team which organised the very first Green Economics and Well Being Retreat. Dr Katherine Kennet is a medical doctor who trained at Imperial College, London University, UK and also is a Global Health specialist. She is now based in the UK and has practised medicine in Nepal as well. Her research focus is on women's health status and the link to wealth and poverty. She has written extensively on materal healthcare in India and outcomes for maternal health and well being in Nepal, and is also interested in mental health and pyschiatry. Miriam Kennet is a specialist in Green Economics. She conceived and ran the world's first Green Economics and Health and Well Being Retreat. She is the Co-Founder and is CEO of the Green Economics Institute She also founded and edits the first Green Economics academic journal in the world, the International Journal of Green Economics, and she has been credited with creating the academic discipline of Green Economics. Green Economics has been recently described by the Bank of England as one of the most vibrant and healthy areas of economics at the moment. She conceived and ran the first ever Green Economics and Health and Well Being Retreat and has run several since. She is a member of Mansfield College and the Environmental Change Institute, both at University of Oxford. The BBC has made a special programme about her life and work. She runs regular conferences at Oxford University about Green Economics. Publishing regularly and having over 100 articles, papers and books. She has been featured in the Harvard Economics Review and Wall Street Journal as a leader. Recently she was named one of 100 most powerful unseen global women by the Charity One World. She is also a regular and frequently speaks at public events of all kinds, most recently to the North West Region of the National Health Service on the latest ideas in Health and Well Being. She is a popular after dinner speaker, and has advised in the Uk Parliament and the Bank of England and in Brussels on the Eurozone crisis, the high speed rail and the general economics situation. She has taught, lectured and spoken at Universities and events all over Europe, from Alicante to Oxford and Bolzano, and to government officials from Montenegro and Kosovo to The UK Cabinet Office, Transport Department, National Government School and Treasury and spoken in Parliaments from Scotland to Austria and The French Senat and Estonia. She is also very active in spreading Green Economics in Asia, China, and all round Africa where people find it may be one of the beacons of hope at the moment in an age of Austerity and Cuts as it provides a completely new way of looking at the world. She is on the Assembly of the Green European Foundation. She has a delegation to the UNFCC COP Kyoto Climate Change Conferences and headed up a delegation to RIO + 20 Earth Summit: Greening the Economy in RIO Brazil where she is very active. She regularly speaks on TV around Europe. Ryota Koike is a researcher from Japan, analysing post-Fukushima Japanese energy policies. He has a broad range of academic interests from peace and development to environmental and nuclear issues. He is a regular speaker and a trainer in workshops and a popular lecturer on green economics and energy policy including at a conference held at Oxford University. Philip Lymbery is Chief Executive of Compassion in World Farming. Bianca Madison-Vuleta has a long experience in the areas of holistic, ecological and sustainable living. She is a PhD candidate in Green Economics. Bianca has been actively involved in the work of numerous national and international human rights and environmental NGOs as a committed and inspired campaigner, fundraiser and reknowned public speaker. A passionate humanitarian and environmentalist and Co-founder of The Sustainable Planet Foundation, Bianca works tirelessly to be the change in the world. Ryte Mamacuviute is a green economist from Vilnius University in Lithuania, who has worked in China on issues of transport and also has lectured in hospitals in the UK about environmental healthcare issues. Virginie Martin, (France) is Associate Professor in Gender, Politics and Communication at the Kedge Business School in Marseille, France. Michelle S. Gale de Oliveira is a director of the Green Economics Institute, UK.She ran the worlds first Green Economics and Well Being and Health Retreat with Miriam Kennet. It was very well attended and a great success, inspiring her to create this book. She is very aware that human basic rights influence health outcomes and makes the connections in this book. She is a member of the Law School of the University of London School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), holding an MA in Human Rights Law with a focus on Islamic Law, Peace-Building, and Developing Countries. Founder of the Gender Progress Consortium, she holds degrees in Political Science and International Relations from Richmond, the American International University in London (RAIUL). She is a deputy editor of the International Journal of Green Economics. Her writing has been featured in Europe's World, one of the foremost European policy magazines. She lectures and speaks on Human Rights, Environmental and Social Justice, Gender Equity, International Development and Green Economics internationally. She also ran a conference on women's unequal pay and poverty in Reading, UK, lectured at the Oxford University Club on the human rights of land reform, is a regular speaker at international conferences and has appeared in the media in Africa, Europe, and Latin America. In 2010/2011, she was a delegate to the UNFCCC's COP15/16 in Copenhagen and Cancun, and in 2012 led a delegation to the United Nations' RIO+20, Sustainable Development Conference where she ran our three side events on green economics. Kristof and Stacia Nordin are the co-founders of Never Ending Food, a community-based endeavor to improve the health of the planet and all of its living organisms through the use of natural, restorative, and sustainable design principles. They have been living and working in Malawi, Africa since 1997 in the areas of HIV, food security, nutrition, and community education. Stacia is a Registered Dietitian and Kristof is a Writer with a background in Social Work and Community Organizing. They both hold Diplomas in Permaculture Design. Their 9 year old daughter, Khalidwe, was born in Malawi and is already an aspiring Permaculturalist. Don O'Neal has a BSc(Hons) in Mathematics and an MA in Environmentalism and Society. He has been the Oxfordshire Greens Treasurer since September 2000 and is a political columnist for The News and The Vincentian, national newspapers in St. Vincent and the Grenadines. He is a co-founder of St. Vincent and the Grenadines Greens. Don is a tireless campaigner and an inspiration for green causes and is involved in overcoming mainstream barriers to health and inclussion. As a beacon he has been up the highest mountain in St Vincent with a team. Vyacheslav Potapenko is based at the National Institute for Strategic Studies of Ukraine, chief consultant (from 2010); Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, docent (2000-2004); The National University of "Kyiv-Mohyla Academy", docent (1999-2000). Professional interests: green economics, natural capital, governmental management, green party, environmental security, Chernobyl rehabilitation, geospace analysis. Co-author of our existing book on Green Energy Policies and specialises in looking at health issues of nuclear power plants. Tutik Rachmawati is researching at the Institute of Local Government Studies, University of Birmingham with a fellowship from Japan-Indonesian Presidential Scholarship/World Bank. She is also a researcher in Center of Excellence in Small Medium Enterprises (SME) Development and a Lecturer in Public Administration Department of Parahyangan Catholic University Lawrence Sappor is a health worker from Ghana and the UK. In 2006, he began research related to HIV/AIDS which was nominated as the best study in the department that year. His work aims ...

"About this title" may belong to another edition of this title.

Top Search Results from the AbeBooks Marketplace

1.

Ms. Miriam Kennet, Katherine Kennet, Michelle Gale De Oliveira, Richard Holcroft
Published by The Green Economics Institute 05/05/2013 (2013)
ISBN 10: 1907543767 ISBN 13: 9781907543760
Used Paperback Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
Bahamut Media
(Reading, United Kingdom)
Rating
[?]

Book Description The Green Economics Institute 05/05/2013, 2013. Paperback. Condition: Very Good. Shipped within 24 hours from our UK warehouse. Clean, undamaged book with no damage to pages and minimal wear to the cover. Spine still tight, in very good condition. Remember if you are not happy, you are covered by our 100% money back guarantee. Seller Inventory # 6545-9781907543760

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy Used
US$ 106.73
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 2.67
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

2.

Ms. Miriam Kennet, Katherine Kennet, Michelle Gale De Oliveira, Richard Holcroft
Published by The Green Economics Institute (2013)
ISBN 10: 1907543767 ISBN 13: 9781907543760
Used Paperback Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
AwesomeBooks
(Wallingford, United Kingdom)
Rating
[?]

Book Description The Green Economics Institute, 2013. Paperback. Condition: Very Good. The Greening of Health and Well Being: Health and Health Care and Well Being in the Age of Green Economics This book is in very good condition and will be shipped within 24 hours of ordering. The cover may have some limited signs of wear but the pages are clean, intact and the spine remains undamaged. This book has clearly been well maintained and looked after thus far. Money back guarantee if you are not satisfied. See all our books here, order more than 1 book and get discounted shipping. . Seller Inventory # 7719-9781907543760

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy Used
US$ 106.73
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 2.67
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds