Religion and textual transmission: East India Company sponsored Orientalist scholarship. “Introductions” to the translations of the Bhagavat Gita and ... (Gender and Culture/ Religion.) (Volume 2)

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9789384281038: Religion and textual transmission: East India Company sponsored Orientalist scholarship. “Introductions” to the translations of the Bhagavat Gita and ... (Gender and Culture/ Religion.) (Volume 2)

This is a collection of primary texts that looks at early colonial-imperial print and the nature of Orientalist scholarship, based on religious texts, that emerged with Sir William Jones, post-1780s. Manuscripts of the Hindu religious texts were often transferred onto print; but what exactly were the processes involved? How did native-brahmins look upon it as they assisted the Britishers in making the shift take place from a manuscript culture to a realm of print technology? The question to ask is thus: did natives operate within a different parallel epistemic world where multiple manuscripts of the same text were seen as legitimate; moreover, why were the brahmins not necessarily keen to see their names on print, but neither were they hesitant to transfer a manuscript culture onto print? These early decades of colonial print can throw more light on the nature of religious-manuscripts that existed in India, before the advent of print in India. Extracts from Rev. P. Percival’s Introduction (1863) to Manavadharma; or the Institutes of Manu (1794), translated by Sir William Jones: Although the Editor had to perform the task he took in hand under great disadvantages,—-having no native Pundits to consult on the countless nice points of criticism with which he had to deal,—his talent and his rare acquirements enabled him to complete it with great and acknowledged success. His Edition of the original text,—the result of a careful comparison of nine manuscripts, obtained from various parts of India, with a printed copy executed by Babu Ram, a learned Pundit of Calcutta,—was enriched by critical and explanatory notes. By the unanimous voice of competent judges, Haughton’s Edition of the text of Manu has ever been considered as, “one of the most beautiful monuments of true philological research combined with sound criticism that Hindu Literature has to boast of.” ... In the attempt to gain an adequate acquaintance with the ancient and sacred Shastra, he had to encounter obstacles almost insuperable. Bigotry and superstition alike opposed him, notwithstanding his high official position. At Benares, the Chief Native Magistrate was unsuccessful in his attempts to procure a Persian translation of the work, the Pundits being unanimous in their refusal to render assistance. The Pundit, with whom Sir William read Sanskrit, reluctantly consented to lend his aid, but only on certain days, when planetary influences were favorable. As preparations for the publication of an English version advanced, the Pundit became alarmed at the prospect of Sir William’s success, and apprehending serious consequences to himself, he earnestly requested that his name might in no way appear in connection with the attempt to make known to foreigners the sacred Institutes of the revered Hindu legislator. Eventually a wealthy Hindu at Gaya, caused a version to be made, which assisted Sir William in his design, and enabled him, at an enormous expense of time and labor, to give the result of his endeavours to the European world in an English version. The translation appeared in the, year 1792. ... The Empire of Britain has, during the short time that has elapsed, been extended to the natural boundaries of the country. Public Servants have been greatly multiplied, and Christian Missionaries, and secular teachers, have been increased a hundred fold. Of late, European capital and enterprise have begun to send forth their Agents to develop the resources, and to share the wealth of the country. Under these altered circumstances a new impression of the Code of Manu must be regarded, not merely as opportune, but as a necessity. To public servants, to those who are engaged in the study and practice of the law, and to Christian teachers, a knowledge of the Institutes must be regarded as indispensable.

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ABOUT FACSIMILE: A CENTER FOR EARLY PRINT AND SOCIETY (1780-1820) Facsimile is an independent research center that works on early print and society in colonial India. It is relevant to remember that print started in Calcutta, India, with the emergence of the East India company in the last two decades of the 18th century. For more information, please visit us at: www.colonialprint.wordpress.com

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Fac Center for Early Print and Society
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Book Description Lies and Big Feet, United States, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. This is a collection of primary texts that looks at early colonial-imperial print and the nature of Orientalist scholarship, based on religious texts, that emerged with Sir William Jones, post-1780s. Manuscripts of the Hindu religious texts were often transferred onto print; but what exactly were the processes involved? How did native-brahmins look upon it as they assisted the Britishers in making the shift take place from a manuscript culture to a realm of print technology? The question to ask is thus: did natives operate within a different parallel epistemic world where multiple manuscripts of the same text were seen as legitimate; moreover, why were the brahmins not necessarily keen to see their names on print, but neither were they hesitant to transfer a manuscript culture onto print? These early decades of colonial print can throw more light on the nature of religious-manuscripts that existed in India, before the advent of print in India. Extracts from Rev. P. Percival s Introduction (1863) to Manavadharma; or the Institutes of Manu (1794), translated by Sir William Jones: Although the Editor had to perform the task he took in hand under great disadvantages, --having no native Pundits to consult on the countless nice points of criticism with which he had to deal, -his talent and his rare acquirements enabled him to complete it with great and acknowledged success. His Edition of the original text, -the result of a careful comparison of nine manuscripts, obtained from various parts of India, with a printed copy executed by Babu Ram, a learned Pundit of Calcutta, -was enriched by critical and explanatory notes. By the unanimous voice of competent judges, Haughton s Edition of the text of Manu has ever been considered as, one of the most beautiful monuments of true philological research combined with sound criticism that Hindu Literature has to boast of. . In the attempt to gain an adequate acquaintance with the ancient and sacred Shastra, he had to encounter obstacles almost insuperable. Bigotry and superstition alike opposed him, notwithstanding his high official position. At Benares, the Chief Native Magistrate was unsuccessful in his attempts to procure a Persian translation of the work, the Pundits being unanimous in their refusal to render assistance. The Pundit, with whom Sir William read Sanskrit, reluctantly consented to lend his aid, but only on certain days, when planetary influences were favorable. As preparations for the publication of an English version advanced, the Pundit became alarmed at the prospect of Sir William s success, and apprehending serious consequences to himself, he earnestly requested that his name might in no way appear in connection with the attempt to make known to foreigners the sacred Institutes of the revered Hindu legislator. Eventually a wealthy Hindu at Gaya, caused a version to be made, which assisted Sir William in his design, and enabled him, at an enormous expense of time and labor, to give the result of his endeavours to the European world in an English version. The translation appeared in the, year 1792. . The Empire of Britain has, during the short time that has elapsed, been extended to the natural boundaries of the country. Public Servants have been greatly multiplied, and Christian Missionaries, and secular teachers, have been increased a hundred fold. Of late, European capital and enterprise have begun to send forth their Agents to develop the resources, and to share the wealth of the country. Under these altered circumstances a new impression of the Code of Manu must be regarded, not merely as opportune, but as a necessity. To public servants, to those who are engaged in the study and practice of the law, and to Christian teachers, a knowledge of the Institutes must be regarded as indispensable. Bookseller Inventory # APC9789384281038

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Center for Early Print and Society, Fac
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Book Description Lies and Big Feet 8/5/2015, 2015. Paperback or Softback. Book Condition: New. Religion and Textual Transmission: East India Company Sponsored Orientalist Scholarship. "Introductions" to the Translations of the Bhagavat Gita and. Book. Bookseller Inventory # BBS-9789384281038

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Fac Center for Early Print and Society
Published by Lies and Big Feet, United States (2015)
ISBN 10: 9384281034 ISBN 13: 9789384281038
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Book Description Lies and Big Feet, United States, 2015. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.This is a collection of primary texts that looks at early colonial-imperial print and the nature of Orientalist scholarship, based on religious texts, that emerged with Sir William Jones, post-1780s. Manuscripts of the Hindu religious texts were often transferred onto print; but what exactly were the processes involved? How did native-brahmins look upon it as they assisted the Britishers in making the shift take place from a manuscript culture to a realm of print technology? The question to ask is thus: did natives operate within a different parallel epistemic world where multiple manuscripts of the same text were seen as legitimate; moreover, why were the brahmins not necessarily keen to see their names on print, but neither were they hesitant to transfer a manuscript culture onto print? These early decades of colonial print can throw more light on the nature of religious-manuscripts that existed in India, before the advent of print in India. Extracts from Rev. P. Percival s Introduction (1863) to Manavadharma; or the Institutes of Manu (1794), translated by Sir William Jones: Although the Editor had to perform the task he took in hand under great disadvantages, --having no native Pundits to consult on the countless nice points of criticism with which he had to deal, -his talent and his rare acquirements enabled him to complete it with great and acknowledged success. His Edition of the original text, -the result of a careful comparison of nine manuscripts, obtained from various parts of India, with a printed copy executed by Babu Ram, a learned Pundit of Calcutta, -was enriched by critical and explanatory notes. By the unanimous voice of competent judges, Haughton s Edition of the text of Manu has ever been considered as, one of the most beautiful monuments of true philological research combined with sound criticism that Hindu Literature has to boast of. . In the attempt to gain an adequate acquaintance with the ancient and sacred Shastra, he had to encounter obstacles almost insuperable. Bigotry and superstition alike opposed him, notwithstanding his high official position. At Benares, the Chief Native Magistrate was unsuccessful in his attempts to procure a Persian translation of the work, the Pundits being unanimous in their refusal to render assistance. The Pundit, with whom Sir William read Sanskrit, reluctantly consented to lend his aid, but only on certain days, when planetary influences were favorable. As preparations for the publication of an English version advanced, the Pundit became alarmed at the prospect of Sir William s success, and apprehending serious consequences to himself, he earnestly requested that his name might in no way appear in connection with the attempt to make known to foreigners the sacred Institutes of the revered Hindu legislator. Eventually a wealthy Hindu at Gaya, caused a version to be made, which assisted Sir William in his design, and enabled him, at an enormous expense of time and labor, to give the result of his endeavours to the European world in an English version. The translation appeared in the, year 1792. . The Empire of Britain has, during the short time that has elapsed, been extended to the natural boundaries of the country. Public Servants have been greatly multiplied, and Christian Missionaries, and secular teachers, have been increased a hundred fold. Of late, European capital and enterprise have begun to send forth their Agents to develop the resources, and to share the wealth of the country. Under these altered circumstances a new impression of the Code of Manu must be regarded, not merely as opportune, but as a necessity. To public servants, to those who are engaged in the study and practice of the law, and to Christian teachers, a knowledge of the Institutes must be regarded as indispensable. Bookseller Inventory # APC9789384281038

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Book Description 2015. PAP. Book Condition: New. New Book. Shipped from US within 10 to 14 business days. THIS BOOK IS PRINTED ON DEMAND. Established seller since 2000. Bookseller Inventory # IQ-9789384281038

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Book Description Lies and Big Feet. Paperback. Book Condition: New. 62 pages. Dimensions: 9.0in. x 6.0in. x 0.1in.This is a collection of primary texts that looks at early colonial-imperial print and the nature of Orientalist scholarship, based on religious texts, that emerged with Sir William Jones, post-1780s. Manuscripts of the Hindu religious texts were often transferred onto print; but what exactly were the processes involved How did native-brahmins look upon it as they assisted the Britishers in making the shift take place from a manuscript culture to a realm of print technology The question to ask is thus: did natives operate within a different parallel epistemic world where multiple manuscripts of the same text were seen as legitimate; moreover, why were the brahmins not necessarily keen to see their names on print, but neither were they hesitant to transfer a manuscript culture onto print These early decades of colonial print can throw more light on the nature of religious-manuscripts that existed in India, before the advent of print in India. Extracts from Rev. P. Percivals Introduction (1863) to Manavadharma; or the Institutes of Manu (1794), translated by Sir William Jones: Although the Editor had to perform the task he took in hand under great disadvantages, -having no native Pundits to consult on the countless nice points of criticism with which he had to deal, his talent and his rare acquirements enabled him to complete it with great and acknowledged success. His Edition of the original text, the result of a careful comparison of nine manuscripts, obtained from various parts of India, with a printed copy executed by Babu Ram, a learned Pundit of Calcutta, was enriched by critical and explanatory notes. By the unanimous voice of competent judges, Haughtons Edition of the text of Manu has ever been considered as, one of the most beautiful monuments of true philological research combined with sound criticism that Hindu Literature has to boast of. In the attempt to gain an adequate acquaintance with the ancient and sacred Shastra, he had to encounter obstacles almost insuperable. Bigotry and superstition alike opposed him, notwithstanding his high official position. At Benares, the Chief Native Magistrate was unsuccessful in his attempts to procure a Persian translation of the work, the Pundits being unanimous in their refusal to render assistance. The Pundit, with whom Sir William read Sanskrit, reluctantly consented to lend his aid, but only on certain days, when planetary influences were favorable. As preparations for the publication of an English version advanced, the Pundit became alarmed at the prospect of Sir Williams success, and apprehending serious consequences to himself, he earnestly requested that his name might in no way appear in connection with the attempt to make known to foreigners the sacred Institutes of the revered Hindu legislator. Eventually a wealthy Hindu at Gaya, caused a version to be made, which assisted Sir William in his design, and enabled him, at an enormous expense of time and labor, to give the result of his endeavours to the European world in an English version. The translation appeared in the, year 1792. . . . The Empire of Britain has, during the short time that has elapsed, been extended to the natural boundaries of the country. Public Servants have been greatly multiplied, and Christian Missionaries, and secular teachers, have been increased a hundred fold. Of late, European capital and enterprise have begun to send forth their Agents to develop the resources, and to share the wealth of the country. Under these altered circumstances a new impression of the Code of Manu must be regarded, not merely as opportune, but as a necessity. To public servants, to those who are engaged in the study and practice of the law, and to Christian teachers, a knowledge of the Institutes must be regarded as indispensable. This item ships from multiple locations. Your book may arrive from Roseburg,OR, La Vergne,TN. Paperback. Bookseller Inventory # 9789384281038

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Book Description 2015. PAP. Book Condition: New. New Book. Delivered from our UK warehouse in 3 to 5 business days. THIS BOOK IS PRINTED ON DEMAND. Established seller since 2000. Bookseller Inventory # IQ-9789384281038

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