Leonardo Da Vinci. A Chinese Scholar Lost in Renaissance Italy

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9789881419804: Leonardo Da Vinci. A Chinese Scholar Lost in Renaissance Italy
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The book "Leonardo Da Vinci. A Chinese Scholar Lost in Renaissance Italy", Lascar Publishing, Angelo Paratico, has been finally released. The news of the thesis it contained went viral around the world in December 2014 causing a storm on the media, with all the major newspapers publishing articles. Not only newspapers and magazines but Angelo had been interviewed by BBC, CNN, Russian, Italian and Spanish television. A French documentary based on different interpretations of the Mona Lisa by Leonardo will also feature Angelo's ideas, and it will be released in July 2015. Here is a short presentation of his book: The life of Leonardo Da Vinci remains an enigma to this day, in spite of documents surfacing from ancient archives and the thousands of pages of his personal notebooks. He was born on 15 April 1452 in Vinci, Tuscany, out of wedlock and unwanted, the result of a casual sexual encounter between Ser Piero di Antonio Da Vinci - a successful notary of the Florentine Republic - and, almost certainly, a domestic Chinese slave named Caterina. Subsequently Ser Piero acted as a matchmaker and arranged for Caterina to wed one of his handymen: Antonio di Pietro del Vaccha d'Andrea Buti, nicknamed Accattabriga meaning quarreller and bully. New documents found recently in Florentine archives oblige us to question the positive image we have of Ser Piero Da Vinci. He appears to be a crook with few scruples, who abandoned his son, Leonardo, leaving him exposed to sexual abuse. It is therefore reasonable to assume that Leonardo spent his youth close to his mother and adoptive father in their house at Campo Zeppi, on the outskirts of Vinci, rather than in Florence, where his aloof father was pursuing a legal career. The investigation into who his mother was is the central theme of the book. It concludes that Caterina might have been a Chinese domestic slave, a woman who could have transmitted part of her culture to her son.

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1.

Angelo Paratico
Published by Lascar Publishing Ltd. (2015)
ISBN 10: 9881419808 ISBN 13: 9789881419804
New Soft cover First Edition Signed Quantity Available: > 20
Seller:
Lascar Publishing Ltd.
(Hong Kong, Hong Kong)
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Book Description Lascar Publishing Ltd., 2015. Soft cover. Condition: New. Dust Jacket Condition: New. 1st Edition. A book which caused a worldwide commotion at the end of 2014. Signed and dated by the author. 8.5X6". With over 70 illustrations in B/W. 299 pages. Quality Paperback. Further information here:http://www.lascarpublishing.com/leonardo/ Musing over the figure of Catherine, Italian historian Edmondo Solmi (1875–1912) wrote: “It seems that nature, after having produced the miracle, wanted to cover with an impenetrable veil the place and the human being which was an instrument for that wonderful effect.” Sigmund Freud was the first to offer an interpretation of Leonardo Da Vinci’s character, which took into account the emotional influence exerted by his mother, and presented it in the book Leonardo Da Vinci and a Memory of His Childhood. Since the first edition in 1910, Freud’s book has been proven correct on many points, with several tassels of Leonardo’s biographic puzzle slowly falling into place. Freud’s essay will often be referred to in the following pages. So, what lies behind Leonardo’s reticence to speak to us? There are reasons to lead us to believe that Leonardo was so mysteriously withdrawn and circumspect because of his mother’s ethnicity. This will be the leitmotiv of our book, in contrast to standard biographies that, despite being continually rewritten, make no attempt to explain who his mother really was and where she was from. Our conclusion is that Catherine, Leonardo’s mother, was a Chinese domestic slave: a woman who could have transmitted part of her culture and her artistic sensibilities to her gifted son. This might be the unspeakable secret behind Leonardo’s youth: not only was he born illegitimate, he was also the son of a domestic slave with oriental roots. To prove our point, we are going to use Ockham’s razor on the corpus of Leonardo Da Vinci’s works, and then cross-referencing them with the scant biographical data available to us, as well as new evidence that recently emerged from the Florentine archives. Catherine was a very young girl when she was spirited out of China, and it is possible that shadows of her native country had remained imprinted into her memory. Catherine’s Chinese facial traits were not recorded in Vinci because – contrary to current wisdom – at that time oriental slaves were a common sight all over Tuscany. Most fell under the category of Tartars, a generic term used to indicate all Eastern people under Mongol domination, including the Chinese. George H. Edgell notes: “As they came by the thousand and were rapidly absorbed by the indigenous population, a certain Mongolian strain could not have been rare in Tuscan homes and streets.” For instance, Ginevra Datini, the beloved daughter of the quintessential Renaissance merchant Francesco Datini (1335–1410), was born to a Tartar domestic slave, a young Mongolian lady named Lucia, who was working in the merchant’s house. This surprising fact would never have come to light without the fortuitous find, in the 19th century, of a treasure trove of Datini’s letters hidden in a secret partition of his palace in Prato, close to Florence. Unfortunately we have not yet had similar luck with Leonardo Da Vinci. This book presents, and discusses, a bulk of newly discovered evidence on Catherine’s origins and of the emotional influence she may have exerted on her first son, offering both evidence and logical deductions that may explain why Leonardo Da Vinci appears to us more like a Chinese literato of the Ming Dynasty than a boastful character of the Italian Renaissance, such as Michelangelo Buonarroti, Benvenuto Cellini or Pietro Aretino. We are going to examine Leonardo Da Vinci as a person, introducing what may be his greatest unknown which is – as Sigmund Freud had distinctly suspected – the enigma of his mother, Catherine, rather than the non-existing influence of his aloof father. Was Catherine really a Chinese domestic slave? Our aim is to offer some answers pertaining to this question to let readers make their own judg. Signed by Author(s). Seller Inventory # 1

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2.

Angelo Paratico
Published by Lascar (2015)
ISBN 10: 9881419808 ISBN 13: 9789881419804
New Soft cover First Edition Signed Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
Lascar Publishing Ltd.
(Hong Kong, Hong Kong)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Lascar, 2015. Soft cover. Condition: New. Dust Jacket Condition: New. 1st Edition. A book which caused a storm before its publication in 2015. 299 pages. Never read but signed and dated by the Author on the front page. The author is an historian with several books and essays published in several languages. After years of research, Angelo Paratico reached an astonishing, yet very logical, conviction: Leonardo Da Vinci may have been the son of a Chinese slave, Caterina. Oriental slaves were imported in Tuscany from Crimea after the Black Death. This book is the story of an historical investigation - like the reopening of a cold case - which, step by step, reveals the greatest mystery of Leonardo’s life. Who was his mother, Catherine? The discovery of new pieces of evidence in the state archives of Florence and the careful reading of ancient documents hitherto never translated in English, brings to light what has been hidden from our eyes, in spite of the ten thousand pages of Leonardo’s notebooks still in our possessions. Signed by Author(s). Seller Inventory # 57

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