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Authority,Dogma and History : The Role of Oxford Movement Converts and the Infallibility Debates of the Nineteenth Century,1835 - 1875

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ISBN 10: 1933146443 / ISBN 13: 9781933146447
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Title: Authority,Dogma and History : The Role of ...

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Synopsis:

As the force that gave birth to Anglo-Catholicism,the Oxford Movement is generally treated as an Anglican phenomenon. Yet the influence of members who converted to Roman Catholicism proved decisive for the years leading up to the First Vatican Council and the definition of papal infallibility in Pastor Aeternus (1870). This collection of original essays edited by Parker and Pahls, explores how various Oxford Movement converts to Roman Catholicism contributed to debates surrounding papal infallibility in the 1850s,1860s and beyond.

Academica Press is an independent scholarly press specializing in publishing monographs and reference material in the humanities and social sciences. We are particularly interested in producing works of scholarly interest English language studies, literary history and criticism ,drama, sociology, education and Irish studies. (Our dedicated imprint, Maunsel & Co., specializes in scholarly research in Irish studies.) We have recently developed projects in African and Afro-American research areas as well as Theology and Legal Studies.

Some select areas where we publish include:

-American 19th- and 20th-Century Language and Literature
-British 19th- and 20th-Century Language and Literature
-Irish Studies
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-English Church History

Review:

This work will prove a significant contribution to the field...its perspective is wide ranging and original. Highly recommended for research and theological libraries. --Professor Andrew Woznicki, University of San Francisco

WHEN I decided to become a Roman Catholic in 1992, I received a letter from an old friend, the his­torian David Newsome, declaring that he had had no doubt for many years that the Roman Church is the one true fold , before explaining his domestic and local difficulties about becoming a Roman Catholic him­self. I had always regarded Newsome as a quintessential Anglican, despite his love of Cardinal Manning he disliked Manning s rival, Cardinal Newman and, indeed, Newsome lived and died in the bosom of the Church of England. This alerted me to the continuing existence of a kind of Nicodemite Ultramontanism among Anglicans, described in ex­cellent works by Michael Yelton, and more recently surfacing in the de­bate over women bishops. This distinguished collection of essays by American scholars, gathered from various conferences, shows how the definition of papal infallibility at the First Vatican Coun­cil in 1870 was influenced by the theological preoccupations of Anglicans who been received into the Roman Catholic Church. These preoccupations were rooted, as Benjamin O Connor shows in his introductory narrative essay, in the Oxford Movement s campaign to emancipate the Church of England from state control, the point on which a number submitted to Rome. Jay Hammond s survey of the Anglican Newman s careful exam­ina­tion of the Arian, Apollinarian, and Monophysite heresies of the ancient Church, according to his guiding hermeneutical principles of conscience, dogma, probability, and imagination, led him to the idea of doctrinal development, which also lies behind the manner of the recep­tion of the definition of 1870 by Roman Catholics. Jay has studied the original archival sources as well as Stephen Thomas s seminal work, Newman and Heresy. C. Michael Shea demonstrates Newman s influence on the Roman Jesuit theologian Giovanni Perrone, in the matter of the definition of the dogma of the immaculate concep­tion in 1854, and in reconciling the minority originally opposed to the definition of infallibility in 1870. Kenneth L. Parker, on the other hand, following James Pereiro s splendid monograph on the subject, roots Henry Edward Manning s radical neo-Ultramontanism in his Anglican quest for the Holy Spirit s voice in a living infallible guide, a supernatural gift that he thought the Church of England could not claim. Hudson Russell Davis charts the radical views on defining the dogma of Manning s great ally, Newman s lay philosophical disciple William George Ward. Some others who went over to Rome and contributed to the defence of the dogma or criticised it are set forth in the learned essay by Donna Reinhard, including such stalwart papalists as Frederick William Faber and Mon­signor George Talbot. Professor Reinhard also refers to the concerns of two of Newman s favourite former-Anglican women, Maria Giberne and Emily Bowles. On the Anglican side, Michael Pahls elucidates the Anglican response to infallibilism by the staunchly Tractarian Edward Bouverie Pusey and the high-church William Ewart Gladstone. A concluding study of Newman s conception of the schola theo­logorum by Pahls suggests that his conception of the rectification or clarification of dogma by future theologians was rooted in his thought as an Anglican, so that both by defending papal infallibil­ism and by shaping its subsequent interpretation, ex-Anglicans con­tributed to the definition of Roman Catholic doctrine. Former Anglicans were, in number, a drop in the ocean of 19th-century Roman Catholicism. Yet this important work, dedicated to the distinguished von Hügel scholar Lawrence Barmann, shows the importance --Dr Sheridan Gilley,Durham University,Church Times

WHEN I decided to become a Roman Catholic in 1992, I received a letter from an old friend, the his­torian David Newsome, declaring that he had had no doubt for many years that the Roman Church is the one true fold , before explaining his domestic and local difficulties about becoming a Roman Catholic him­self. I had always regarded Newsome as a quintessential Anglican, despite his love of Cardinal Manning he disliked Manning s rival, Cardinal Newman and, indeed, Newsome lived and died in the bosom of the Church of England. This alerted me to the continuing existence of a kind of Nicodemite Ultramontanism among Anglicans, described in ex­cellent works by Michael Yelton, and more recently surfacing in the de­bate over women bishops. This distinguished collection of essays by American scholars, gathered from various conferences, shows how the definition of papal infallibility at the First Vatican Coun­cil in 1870 was influenced by the theological preoccupations of Anglicans who been received into the Roman Catholic Church. These preoccupations were rooted, as Benjamin O Connor shows in his introductory narrative essay, in the Oxford Movement s campaign to emancipate the Church of England from state control, the point on which a number submitted to Rome. Jay Hammond s survey of the Anglican Newman s careful exam­ina­tion of the Arian, Apollinarian, and Monophysite heresies of the ancient Church, according to his guiding hermeneutical principles of conscience, dogma, probability, and imagination, led him to the idea of doctrinal development, which also lies behind the manner of the recep­tion of the definition of 1870 by Roman Catholics. Jay has studied the original archival sources as well as Stephen Thomas s seminal work, Newman and Heresy. C. Michael Shea demonstrates Newman s influence on the Roman Jesuit theologian Giovanni Perrone, in the matter of the definition of the dogma of the immaculate concep­tion in 1854, and in reconciling the minority originally opposed to the definition of infallibility in 1870. Kenneth L. Parker, on the other hand, following James Pereiro s splendid monograph on the subject, roots Henry Edward Manning s radical neo-Ultramontanism in his Anglican quest for the Holy Spirit s voice in a living infallible guide, a supernatural gift that he thought the Church of England could not claim. Hudson Russell Davis charts the radical views on defining the dogma of Manning s great ally, Newman s lay philosophical disciple William George Ward. Some others who went over to Rome and contributed to the defence of the dogma or criticised it are set forth in the learned essay by Donna Reinhard, including such stalwart papalists as Frederick William Faber and Mon­signor George Talbot. Professor Reinhard also refers to the concerns of two of Newman s favourite former-Anglican women, Maria Giberne and Emily Bowles. On the Anglican side, Michael Pahls elucidates the Anglican response to infallibilism by the staunchly Tractarian Edward Bouverie Pusey and the high-church William Ewart Gladstone. A concluding study of Newman s conception of the schola theo­logorum by Pahls suggests that his conception of the rectification or clarification of dogma by future theologians was rooted in his thought as an Anglican, so that both by defending papal infallibil­ism and by shaping its subsequent interpretation, ex-Anglicans con­tributed to the definition of Roman Catholic doctrine. Former Anglicans were, in number, a drop in the ocean of 19th-century Roman Catholicism. Yet this important work, dedicated to the distinguished von Hügel scholar Lawrence Barmann, shows the importance of the ideas and outlook of such an educated élite, whose influence was out of all proportion to its numbers. --Dr Sheridan Gilley,Durham University,Church Times

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