Carnal Matters

Goodman, Alexander (pseudonym of George Haimsohn)

Published by Guild Press (1965), 1965
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84 pages. Four gay-themed short stories by the co-writer of the Broadway hit Dames at Sea. Haimsohn was Jack Spicer's first male lover, also. Young, 1507. First edition (first printing). Very good in wrappers (paperback). Uncommon. Bookseller Inventory #

Bibliographic Details

Title: Carnal Matters
Publisher: Guild Press (1965)
Publication Date: 1965
Binding: Pamphlet
Book Condition: Very Good
Edition: First Edition.

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1.

WEBSTER, John
Published by J. M., London (1677)
Used First Edition Quantity Available: 1
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Second Life Books, Inc.
(Lanesborough, MA, U.S.A.)
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Book Description J. M., London, 1677. First Edition. folio, [xvi], 346, [iv]. Engraved headpiece above chapter one. With the imprimatur leaf, final blank and free endpapers. Rebound in new calf backed marble paper with new endpapers.Tape remnants to the enner margin of the title and imprimatur leaf. This is a large paper copy with wide margins (13-1/2 x 9-1/8 inches). Leaves little toned, but a very good copy. Wing W1230. Krivatsy 12612. Norman 2191. Osler 4202. OCEL I:157. Lowndes, 2864; Hunter & Macalpine, 209-211; Bibliotheca Chemica, 532; Caillet 11366. This is a forceful rejection of what Webster perceived as popular credulity on the subject. He was, however, by no means a thorough skeptic, and spoke reverently of "that secret and sublime art of the transmutation of metals," and clearly had a strong belief in 'natural magick' and its proponents, describing Agrippa and Fludd, respectively, as "that great philosopher and master of natural and lawful Magick," and "a person of much learning and great sincerity." Thus Ferguson commented that "Though a declared skeptic about witchcraft, he was in love with astrology, alchemy, Rosicrucianism, and mysticism," further observing that while 'The Displaying of the Supposed Witchcraft' was 'a well reasoned and sensible attack on that misbelief, it did not stem the tide of popular superstition and cruelty. While odium was heaped on the author by Glanvill and Henry More.'Webster (dealt largely in theological and scriptural arguments. It was along this line, indeed, that he made his most important contribution to the controversy then going on. Glanvill had urged that disbelief in witchcraft was but one step in the path to atheism. No witches, no spirits, no immortality, no God, were the sequences of Glanvill's reasoning. In answer Webster urged that the denial of the existence of witches, i.e. of creatures endued with the power from the Devil to perform supernatural wonders—had nothing to do with the existence of angels or spirits If we grant the existence of spirits, to modernize the form of Webster's argument; we do not thereby prove the existence of witches" (Notestein, 299-300). Norman notes: "Webster attacked the credulous views of Meric, Casaubon, Richard Glanvill, and Henry More concerning witchcraft and demonology.". Bookseller Inventory # 43600

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2.

Webster, John
Published by Jonas Moore [J.M.] c.1676-77, London (1676)
Used Hardcover First Edition Signed Quantity Available: 1
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Book Description Jonas Moore [J.M.] c.1676-77, London, 1676. Edition : First edition, Original full calf, skillfully rebacked with 5 raised bands, with gilt bands and motives, gilt morocco label on 2, contemporary marbled pasted and free endpapers, all edges speckled. , Manuscript leaf at front of book illustrated and most probably signed by the author due to reasons cited below.Webster studied under the Hungarian alchemist Johannes Huniades (János Bánfi-Hunyadi). He became a curate in Kildwick in 1634. During the First English Civil War, Webster left his later position as a teacher in Clitheroe and became a surgeon and army chaplain in the Parliamentarian forces. The present work, ?The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft? (1677) is a critical review of evidence for witchcraft. He opposed Henry More and Joseph Glanvill, who were arguing for the reality of witches. While a declared sceptic about witchcraft and disputing the more extravagant statements about powers widely attributed to witches, he greatly admired astrology, alchemy, Rosicrucianism and mysticism. Webster went as far as suggesting that the Bible had been mistranslated to support belief in witchcraft thereby refuting the scriptural arguments in favour of witchcraft. Following his death it was argued that books that at one time formed part of Webster?s collection had his favourite signature, Johannes Hyphantes, in his autograph, on the title pages. It was claimed that Rev. A. Dyce proved that John Webster, author of the ?Examen Academiarum?, and John Webster, author of the ?Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft?, were one and the same person. Thomas Potts later argued in his 19th century work that Dyce had not connected his insights with Dr. Henry More?s observation that the author of ?Examen Academiarum? was, like Webster, ?a Cambridge scholar? Potts also notes that the inscription on Webster's monument in the chapel of St. Mary Magdalen, at Clitheroe shows that Johannes Hyphantes and John Webster are one and the same person. The text on the 1st manuscript leaf, which is the same as the text on the monument, reads as follows: ?Qui hanc figuram intelligunt Me etiam intellexisse, intelligent. Hic ja?Examen Academiarum?,cet ignotus mundo mersusque tumultu Invidiae semper mens tamen cequa fuit, Multa tulit veterum ut sciret secreta tophorum Ac tandem vires noverit ignis aquae. --------- Johannes Hyphantes sive Webster, In villa Spinosa supermontana, in Parochia silcae cuculatae, in agro Eboracensi, natus 1610 Feb 3, Ergastulum animae deposuit 1682, Junii 18, Annoq. aetatia suae 72 currente. Sic peroravit moriens mundo huic vulftdicens, ea pax vivis, requies aeterna Sepultis? This manuscript is illustrated with a design, depicting the sun at the centre of circles and tringles, showing symbols of alpha and omega, water and fire, male and female and the text, Aqua cum Igne tandem in grateam reditThe text of 2nd manuscript leaf reads: ?Carrhale, 17th, March 1797. I believe that the author of this book, who subscribes himself, ?John Webster, Practitioner in Physics?, was the Officiating Clergyman or Curate of Kildwick in Yorkshire in the year 1624. My reasons for this opinion are as follows: Many of the Persecuted Clergy at the times of theUsurpations, which took places anno 1648, applied themselves to the practice of Medicine for a sustenance to themselves and their families. The Author speaks of the kindness received from the then Mr Pisky of Browsholm & others, in his Dedication, during the time of great sufferings& persecutions. And lastly, in pages 277, speaking of himself in the first person, he expressly says I ? was Curate of Kildwick,&; which, I think, is predicable of the Author only, no other person being mentioned buried in Clitheroe Church; to whose memory a Brass-plate is erected on the Southwall, opposite the Pulpit. He is there described as having been eminent for his knowledge of Chemistry; and as having lived some time in ?Villa Spinosa?, that is, Thornton Craven.? [signed] J.A. [sealed twice on bottom of page] , Size : S. Bookseller Inventory # B4952

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