Stock Image

The Civil War (A Narrative - Vol. 2, Fredericksburg to Meridian

Foote, Shelby

4,682 ratings by Goodreads
ISBN 10: 0394419510 / ISBN 13: 9780394419510
Published by Random House, 1963
Condition: Very Good Hardcover
From Bookworm Bookstore (HARRISBURG, PA, U.S.A.)

AbeBooks Seller Since October 15, 1998

Quantity Available: 1

Buy Used
Price: US$ 30.00 Convert Currency
Shipping: US$ 3.50 Within U.S.A. Destination, Rates & Speeds
Add to basket

30 Day Return Policy

About this Item

988 pp. illustrated with 48 maps and 3 end paper maps especially designed for this volume. The volume covers many of the greatest and bloodiest battles of history. Bookseller Inventory # 38199

Ask Seller a Question

Bibliographic Details

Title: The Civil War (A Narrative - Vol. 2, ...

Publisher: Random House

Publication Date: 1963

Binding: Hard Cover

Book Condition:Very Good

Dust Jacket Condition: Very Good

About this title

Synopsis:

Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best nonfiction books of all time

The first volume of Shelby Foote's tremendous narrative of the Civil War was greeted enthusiastically by critics and readers alike (see back of jacket for comments). In this dramatic second volume the scope and power, the lively portrayal of exciting personalities, and the memorable re-creation of events have continued unmistakably. In addition, "Fredericksburg to Meridian" covers many of the greatest and bloodiest battles of history.

The authoritative narrative is dominated by the almost continual confrontation of great armies. For the fourth time, the Army of the Potomac (now under the command of Burnside) attempts to take Richmond, resulting in the blood-bath at Fredericksburg: Then Joe Hooker tries again, only to be repulsed at Chancellorsville as Stonewall Jackson turns his flank -- a bitter victory for the South, paid for by the death' of Lee's foremost lieutenant.

In the West, during the six-month standoff that followed the shock of Murfreesboro in the central theater, one of the most complex and determined sieges of the war has begun. Here Grant's seven relentless efforts against Vicksburg show Lincol that he has at last found his killer-genera the man who can "face the arithmetic."

With Vicksburg finally under siege, Lee again invades the North. The three-day conflict at Gettysburg receives book-length attention in a masterly treatment of a key great battle, not as legend has it but as it really was, before it became distorted by controversy and overblown by remembered glory.

Then begins the downhill fight -- the sudden glare of Chickamauga and the North's great day at Missionary Ridge, followed by the Florida fiasco and Sherman's meticulous destruction of Meridian, which left that section of the South facing the aftermath even before the war was over.

Against this backdrop of smoke and battle, Lincoln and Davis try in their separate ways to hold their people together: Lincoln by letters and statements climaxing in the Gettysburg Address; and Davis by two long roundabout western trips in which he makes personal appeals to crowds along his way.

"Fredericksburg to Meridian" is full of the life of the times -- the elections of 1863, the resignations of Seward and Chase, the Conscription riots, the mounting opposition (on both sides) to the crushing war, and then the inescapable resolution that it must go on.

And as before, the whole sweeping story is told entirely through the lives and actions of the people involved, a matchless narrative which could be sustained so brilliantly only by one of our finest novelists.

From the Inside Flap:

The first volume of Shelby Foote's tremendous narrative of the Civil War was greeted enthusiastically by critics and readers alike (see back of jacket for comments). In this dramatic second volume the scope and power, the lively portrayal of exciting personalities, and the memorable re-creation of events have continued unmistakably. In addition, "Fredericksburg to Meridian" covers many of the greatest and bloodiest battles of history.
The authoritative narrative is dominated by the almost continual confrontation of great armies. For the fourth time, the Army of the Potomac (now under the command of Burnside) attempts to take Richmond, resulting in the blood-bath at Fredericksburg: Then Joe Hooker tries again, only to be repulsed at Chancellorsville as Stonewall Jackson turns his flank -- a bitter victory for the South, paid for by the death' of Lee's foremost lieutenant.
In the West, during the six-month standoff that followed the shock of Murfreesboro in the central theater, one of the most complex and determined sieges of the war has begun. Here Grant's seven relentless efforts against Vicksburg show Lincol that he has at last found his killer-genera the man who can "face the arithmetic."
With Vicksburg finally under siege, Lee again invades the North. The three-day conflict at Gettysburg receives book-length attention in a masterly treatment of a key great battle, not as legend has it but as it really was, before it became distorted by controversy and overblown by remembered glory.
Then begins the downhill fight -- the sudden glare of Chickamauga and the North's great day at Missionary Ridge, followed by the Florida fiasco and Sherman's meticulous destruction ofMeridian, which left that section of the South facing the aftermath even before the war was over.
Against this backdrop of smoke and battle, Lincoln and Davis try in their separate ways to hold their people together: Lincoln by letters and statements climaxing in the Gettysburg Address; and Davis by two long roundabout western trips in which he makes personal appeals to crowds along his way.
"Fredericksburg to Meridian" is full of the life of the times -- the elections of 1863, the resignations of Seward and Chase, the Conscription riots, the mounting opposition (on both sides) to the crushing war, and then the inescapable resolution that it must go on.
And as before, the whole sweeping story is told entirely through the lives and actions of the people involved, a matchless narrative which could be sustained so brilliantly only by one of our finest novelists.

"About this title" may belong to another edition of this title.

Store Description

The Bookworm Bookstore is one of twenty-five Specialty Shops featured on the Second Level of the West Shore Farmer`s Market located at 900 Market Street, Lemoyne, Pennsylvania (2 miles west of the State Capitol in Harrisburg across the Market Street Bridge). The hours are Tuesday and Saturday 9AM-2PM and Friday 9AM-4PM which coincide with the Farm Market hours.(We will also open by appointment) The shop offers a wide variety of subjects generally found in an out-of-print bookstore and also conducts appraisals as well as paperback trading and search services. Within the store there is an inventory between 15,000 and 20,000 volumes as well as hundreds of beautifully matted prints suitable for framing. The Bookworm Bookstore also maintains on-line offerings numbering over 12,000 titles in 100 catalogues.

Visit Seller's Storefront

Terms of Sale:

If you feel the description of what you receive is inaccurate, our policy is to refund your money. PayPal, as well as checks and money orders made out to Samuel G. Marcus which will include the price of the book as well as the appropriate postage. PA residents--Please add 6% sales tax. Postage will be $5.50(Priority Mail) and $1.00 for each additional book and $3.50 (Media Mail) amd $1.00 for each additional book. In some instances, over-sized volumes will require additional postage.


Shipping Terms:

Orders usually shipped within 2 business days. Shipping costs are based on books weighing 2.2 LB, or 1 KG. If your book order is heavy or oversized, we may contact you to let you know extra shipping is required.

List this Seller's Books

Payment Methods
accepted by seller

Visa Mastercard American Express

Check Money Order PayPal