Description of East florida, With A Journal, Kept By John Bartram of

[STORK, William, and John BARTRAM].

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[STORK, William, and John BARTRAM]. Description of East Florida, With A Journal, Kept By John Bartram of Philadelphia, Botanist to His Majesty for the Floridas; Upon A Journey From St. Augustine up the River St. John's, As Far As the Lakes. London: Sold by W. Nicoll.and T. Jefferys, 1769. [4], viii, 40, [2], xii,35,[1]pp. plus large engraved folding map and two engraved folding plans. Quarto. Contemporary three-quarter calf and marbled boards; rebacked to style, spine gilt. Very minor foxing and soiling. Very good plus. HOWES S1042, "b." SABIN 92222. VAIL 600. DE RENNE I:193. SERVIES 480. TAXONOMIC LITERATURE I:131-132. EBERSTADT 131:283. STREETER SALE 1183 (1766 ed). CUMMING 379 (map). PHILLIPS MAPS, p.280 (map).The third and by far the best edition of one of the most important 18th-century works on Florida, with significant additions and fine maps not found in the previous editions. Great Britain took possession of Florida in the peace settlement of the French and Indian War in 1763, opening the way to its development and exploration by the English. The promoter William Stork teamed up with the famed naturalist John Bartram to explore in the eastern part of Florida, up the St. Johns River near present day Jacksonville, in the winter of 1765-66. "The celebrated botanist's journal complements Stork's promotional account, and both are among the most important sources for the history of East Florida" - Streeter. Stork describes the importance of East Florida to Great Britain, especially regarding commerce and relations with the Spanish settlements. Bartram's journal stresses the botanical findings of the territory, listing many plants with their descriptions. This edition, the rarest of the three published, is noted for the plans of St. Augustine and the Bay of Espiritu Santo and a large map of the region, all by Thomas Jefferys. The map, titled East Florida from Surveys made since the last Peace, depicts the major cities and waterways of Florida and is particularly notable for showing the overland route from St. Augustine to St. Mark of Apalache. The map depicts the peninsula as far north as Savannah and as far west as Pensacola. A lovely copy of one of the most important 18th-century works on Florida, significant for its contributions to travel literature, natural history, and cartography. Bookseller Inventory #

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Bartram, John and Stork, William
Published by London (1769)
Used Hardcover Quantity Available: 1
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Broadfoot Publishing Company
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Book Description London, 1769. Hardcover. Book Condition: Near Fine. A DESCRIPTION OF EAST FLORIDA, WITH A JOURNAL, KEPT BY JOHN BARTRAM OF PHILADELPHIA, BOTANIST TO HIS MAJESTY FOR THE FLORIDAS; UPON A JOURNEY FROM ST. AUGUSTINE UP THE RIVER ST. JOHN’S , AS FAR AS THE LAKE. London: sold by W. Nicoll .and T. Jefferys, 1769. [4], viii, 40, [2], xii, 35, [1] pages. Folding map and two engraved folding plans. ½ leather, marbled boards in custom slipcase. The third and by far the best edition of one of the most important 18th century works on Florida, with significant additions and maps not found in previous editions. “The celebrated botanist’s journal complements Stork’s promotional account, and both are among the most important sources for the history of East Florida.” –Streeter. This edition, the rarest of the three published includes the plans of St. Augustine and the Bay of Espiritu Santo and a large map of the region, all by Thomas Jefferys, made since the last peace, depicts the major cities and waterways of Florida. Some pages have marginal smoke stains, text unaffected, rebound in ½ leather, spine stamped in gold, marbled boards, matching slipcase, handsome. Bookseller Inventory # ABE-1490884154942

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STORK, William, and John BARTRAM (1699 - 1777).
Published by London: W. Nicoll, 1769. (1769)
Used Softcover Quantity Available: 1
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Book Description London: W. Nicoll, 1769., 1769. 2 parts in one volume. 4to., (10 6/8 x 8 inches). Three folding engraved maps of St. Augustine, East Florida (expertly laid down on archival tissue), and Espirito Santo Bay (title-pages a bit frayed at the edges, some occasional spotting). Half modern calf antique (extremities a bit scuffed). Provenance: With the ink library stamps of the Long Island Historical Society at the foot of the title-page and last leaf of text. Third edition of Stork's account, second edition of celebrated botanist John Bartram's "Journal.": "Bartram's scientific and commercial endeavors flourished in the 1750s and 1760s, his botanical supply business providing the income and incentive to enable him to travel ever wider in search of new specimens. In 1765, the aging Bartram set sail from Philadelphia to join his son, William, in Charleston to begin a botanical and scientific survey of the South. From Charleston, they traveled overland to Saint Augustine and Fort Picolata on the Saint John's River, and from there, by canoe and foot throughout the extensive drainage basin. Like many natural histories, Stork's tract is part promotional, part natural historical. A knowledge of flora and fauna was essential for successful -- and profitable -- settlement, and writers and land owners stood to profit personally from an increase in interest. Adding to a promising description of Saint Augustine, and chapters on the climate, soil, and animal and plant life, Stork included bullish tracts on the potential in Florida for the cultivation of rice, cotton, silk, sugar, indigo, and other profitable crops. On the same latitude as the productive English colonies in Bengal and China, the warm climate of Florida made silk culture particularly likely, whereas in "Carolina and Georgia the worms are often injured by accidental frosts" (American Philosophical Library online). Clark 1:195; Cumming 379; De Renne I. p. 193; Howes S1042; Sabin 92222; Servies 480; Vail 600. Catalogued by Kate Hunter. Bookseller Inventory # 002402

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STORK, William], and John BARTRAM (1699 - 1777).
Published by London: W. Nicoll, 1769. (1769)
Used Softcover Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
Arader Galleries - Aradernyc
(New York, NY, U.S.A.)
Rating
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Book Description London: W. Nicoll, 1769., 1769. 2 parts in one volume. 4to., (10 5/8 x 8 2/8 inches). Two letterpress title-pages. Three folding engraved maps of St. Augustine, East Florida (with a closed tear extending across the middle of the map), and Espirito Santo Bay (early repair to verso). Modern green morocco backed green cloth. "among the most important sources for the history of East Florida" (Streeter). Third edition of Stork's account, second edition of celebrated botanist John Bartram's "Journal.": "Bartram's scientific and commercial endeavors flourished in the 1750s and 1760s, his botanical supply business providing the income and incentive to enable him to travel ever wider in search of new specimens. In 1765, the aging Bartram set sail from Philadelphia to join his son, William, in Charleston to begin a botanical and scientific survey of the South. From Charleston, they traveled overland to Saint Augustine and Fort Picolata on the Saint John's River, and from there, by canoe and foot throughout the extensive drainage basin. Like many natural histories, Stork's tract is part promotional, part natural historical. A knowledge of flora and fauna was essential for successful -- and profitable -- settlement, and writers and land owners stood to profit personally from an increase in interest. Adding to a promising description of Saint Augustine, and chapters on the climate, soil, and animal and plant life, Stork included bullish tracts on the potential in Florida for the cultivation of rice, cotton, silk, sugar, indigo, and other profitable crops. On the same latitude as the productive English colonies in Bengal and China, the warm climate of Florida made silk culture particularly likely, whereas in "Carolina and Georgia the worms are often injured by accidental frosts" (American Philosophical Library online). Clark 1:195; Cumming 379; De Renne I. p. 193; Howes S1042; Sabin 92222; Servies 480; Streeter Sale 1183; Vail 600. Catalogued by Kate Hunter. Bookseller Inventory # 72lib8

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