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No Dogs and Not Many Chinese, Treaty Port Life in China 1843-1943

Wood, Frances

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ISBN 10: 0719557585 / ISBN 13: 9780719557583
Published by John Murray, London, 1998
Used Condition: Good Hardcover
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vi-xiii; 368pp; illustrated; one map; d/j has light edgewear to spine ends. Size: 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall. Bookseller Inventory # 031820

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Bibliographic Details

Title: No Dogs and Not Many Chinese, Treaty Port ...

Publisher: John Murray, London

Publication Date: 1998

Binding: Hard Cover

Book Condition:Good

Dust Jacket Condition: Good

About this title

Synopsis:

In 1793 the Chinese Emperor rebuffed the first formal British mission to attempt to open China to foreign trade. However, British merchants persisted, and the first treaty ports were opened in 1843. This is the story of treaty port life in China, detailing the lives of merchants and missionaries. One of the first treaty ports was Shanghai, soon a byword for luxury and squalor. Later small enclaves were opened along the Yangtze, cities like Chongqing, and sub-tropical towns like Beihai. Despite typhoons, disease, banditry and riots, merchants and missionary families in the treaty ports enjoyed steeplechases on "China ponies" and shooting parties on Shanghai's mudflats; Chinese cooks learnt to make Christmas pudding and Chinese tailors copied Paris fashions. Many visitors were drawn to the treaty ports, including Noel Coward and Wallis Simpson, Arthur Ransome and W.H. Auden, Peter Fleming and Robert Fortune. Some stayed on, among them Harold Acton, Osbert Sitwell and Robert Byron, who made temporary home amongst Peking's diplomats. Others sought in the treaty ports a refuge from bankruptcy, persecution or imprisonment. In 1943 the treaty ports were returned to China and most of their inhabitants were interned by the Japanese. yet the record of their residence remains in Shanghai's solid office buildings, in Tianjin's mock Tudor facades, and in the Edwardian villas of Beidahei and Xiamen. Through the reminiscences of the last inhabitants of the treaty ports, some of whom are still alive, this book recalls a foreign life lived in a foreign land.

About the Author:

Frances Wood studied Chinese at the universities of Cambridge, London and Peking, and between 1972 and 1988 travelled extensively in China. She is now Head of the Chinese Collections in the British Library. She is the author of Did Marco Polo Go to China?, also the subject of a Channel 4 documentary, and Handgrenade Practice in Peking: My Part in the Cultural Revolution (John Murray, 2000).

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