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Economics: Making Sense of the Modern Economy

Simon Cox

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ISBN 10: 1861976062 / ISBN 13: 9781861976062
Published by Viva Books, 2008
New Condition: New Soft cover
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About this Item

Written in the accessible, intelligent, jargon-free style for which The Economist is famous, this book is aimed at anyone - from students to presidents - who wants to make sense of the modern economy and grasp how economic theory works in practice. The laws of economics do not change from week to week. If you have ever wondered why America?s trade deficit attracts so much fuss, why central bankers enjoy so much deference, whether stockbrokers earn their commissions, or why we cannot solve unemployment by sharing work out more evenly, the articles in this book provide answers based on economic principles of lasting relevance. The book is in four parts: The case for globalisation: How it has gathered pace, and why its critics? views are understandable but often misguided ? The lopsided global economy: The phoney recovery - why America?s recovery from recession rings hollow; America?s imbalances - how the United States? appetite for debt is dangerous; China?s rise - and what it presages for the world economy ; The underachievers - an analysis of the problems that previous economic giants such as Germany and Japan have run into ? The arteries of capitalism: Finance - how the system works; Central banks - an analysis of the role they play; Global capital - an increasingly powerful force ? Worldly philosophy: The uses and abuses of economics - truths and fallacies Contents: Introduction ? Part 1 The new liberalism: The case for globalization ? Part 2 the lopsided world economy: The phoney recovery; America?s imbalances; China?s rise; The underachievers ? Part 3 The arteries of capitalism: Finance; Central banks; Global capital ? Part 4 Worldly philosophy: The uses and abuses of economics ? Index Printed Pages: 338. Bookseller Inventory # 8230

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Bibliographic Details

Title: Economics: Making Sense of the Modern ...

Publisher: Viva Books

Publication Date: 2008

Binding: Softcover

Book Condition:New

Edition: 2nd edition.

About this title

Synopsis:

Written in the accessible, intelligent, jargon-free style for which The Economist is famous, this book is aimed at anyone – from students to presidents – who wants to make sense of the modern economy and grasp how economic theory works in practice.

The laws of economics do not change from week to week. If you have ever wondered why America's trade deficit attracts so much fuss, why central bankers enjoy so much deference, whether stockbrokers earn their commissions, or why we cannot share unemployment by sharing work out more evenly, the articles in this book provide answers based on economic principles of lasting relevance.

Part one of the book looks at globalisation. Part two track the fortunes of the world economy - America's recovery and its imbalances; China's rise; and the brighter signs for the Japanese and German economies after years of underachievement. Part three examines the "capital" in capitalism - what finance does for the economy; how money and credit are created, regulated and circulated; and capial flows across national borders. Part four explores how economics is applied and misapplied - what the market can achieve and how it can fail.

About the Author:

Simon Cox is The Economist's economics correspondent. He contributed to chapter nine. He is also the editor of this book.

Contributors
Brian Barry
is The Economist's business correspondent based in Chicago. He contributed articles to chapters five and nine.

Simon Cox is The Economist's economics correspondent. He contributed to chapter nine. He is also the editor of this book.

Clive Crook was deputy editor of The Economist. He wrote chapters one and eight, and contributed to chapter nine.

Robert Guest was Africa editor of The Economist and is now the paper's Washington correspondent. He contributed to chapter nine.

Patrick Lane is the finance editor of The Economist. He contributed to chapter nine.

Marc Levinson was finance editor of The Economist. He wrote chapter six.

Zanny Minton-Beddoes is Washington economics editor of The Economist. She wrote chapter three, and contributed to chapter nine.

David Shirreff is The Economist's finance and business correspondent based in Frankfurt. He contributed to chapter five.

John Smutniak was The Economist's economics correspondent. He contributed to chapter nine.

Paul Wallace is The Economist's UK economics correspondent. He contributed to chapter nine.

Pam Woodall is economics editor of The Economist. She wrote chapters two and four. She also contributed to chapters seven, five and nine.

"About this title" may belong to another edition of this title.

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