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Fort Dix Nuclear/Chemical Accident/Incident Control Plan (FD-NCAICP)

United States. Department of Defense. Department of the Army. US Army Traiing Center and Fort Dix

Published by Headquarters, US Army Training Center, Fort Dix, NJ, 1976
Soft cover
From Ground Zero Books, Ltd. (Silver Spring, MD, U.S.A.)

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Includes illustrations. Three-hole punched and staple bound. Various paginations(approximately 150 pages). References. Thius plan was published for the information, guidance and necessary action of commanders, directors and office/activity chiefs concerns and supersedes the previous plan dated 1 February 1975. From Wikipedia: "Fort Dix, the common name for the Dix unit of Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, is a United States Army base located approximately 16.1 miles (25.9 km) south-southeast of Trenton, New Jersey. Dix is under the jurisdiction of the United States Army Reserve Command (USARC). Fort Dix, established in 1917, was consolidated with two adjoining U.S. Air Force and Navy facilities to became part of Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst (JB MDL) on 1 October 2009. However, it remains commonly known as Fort Dix as of 2012.Fort Dix is named for Major General John Adams Dix, a veteran of the War of 1812 and the Civil War. Construction began in June 1917. Camp Dix, as it was known at the time, was a training and staging ground for units during World War I. The camp became a demobilization center after the war. Between the World Wars, Camp Dix was a reception, training and discharge center for the Civilian Conservation Corps. Camp Dix became Fort Dix on March 8, 1939, and the installation became a permanent Army post. During and after World War II the fort served the same purpose as in the first World War. It served as a training and staging ground during the war and a demobilization center after the war. On July 15, 1947, Fort Dix became a Basic Training Center and the home of the 9th Infantry Division. In 1954, the 9th moved out and the 69th Infantry Division made the fort home until it was deactivated on March 16, 1956. During the Vietnam War rapid expansion took place. A mock Vietnam village was constructed and soldiers received Vietnam-specific training before being deployed. Since Vietnam, Fort Dix has sent soldiers to Operation Desert Shield, Desert Storm, Bosnia, Afghanistan, and Iraq. The Atlantic Strike Team (AST) of the U.S. Coast Guard is based at Fort Dix. As part of the Department of Homeland Security, the AST is responsible for responding to oil pollution and hazardous materials release incidents to protect public health and the environment. Fort Dix is also home to Fort Dix Federal Correctional Institution, the largest single federal prison in America. It is a low security installation for male inmates located within the military installation. As of November 19, 2009 it housed 4, 310 inmates, and a minimum-security satellite camp housed an additional 426. Inmates use plastic pouches of mackerel as commodity money. Knowing that Fort Dix was on a base closure list the U.S. Air Force attempted to save the U.S. Army post during 1987. The USAF moved the Security Police Air Base Ground Defence school from Camp Bullis Texas to Dix in the fall of 1987. It was eventually realized that it was not cost effective to put 50-100 S.P. trainees on a commercial flight from San Antonio, Texas to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania every couple of weeks, so the school was later moved back to Camp Bullis Texas. Fort Dix was an early casualty of the first Base Realignment and Closure process in the early 1990s, losing the basic-training mission that had introduced new recruits to military life since 1917. But Fort Dix advocates attracted Army Reserve interest in keeping the 31, 000-acre (13, 000 ha) post as a training reservation. With the reserves, and millions for improvements, Fort Dix actually has grown again to employ 3, 000. As many as 15, 000 troops train there on weekends, and the post has been a major mobilization point for reserve and National Guard troops since the September 11, 2001 attacks on New York City and Washington, D.C. Fort Dix has completed its realignment from an individual training center to a FORSCOM Power Projection Platform for the Northeastern United States under the command and control of the United States Ar. Bookseller Inventory # 67415

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Bibliographic Details

Title: Fort Dix Nuclear/Chemical Accident/Incident ...

Publisher: Headquarters, US Army Training Center, Fort Dix, NJ

Publication Date: 1976

Binding: Wraps

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Founded and operated by trained historians, Ground Zero Books, Ltd., serves the book collector, the scholar, and institutions. We focus on the individual, and pride ourselves on our personal service. Please contact us with your wants, as we have many books not yet listed in our database.

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Books, Ltd., is owned & operated by R. Alan Lewis & Lynne Haims.


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