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GEORGE ELIOT S SERIAL FICTION (VICTORIAN LIFE & LITERATURE)

MARTIN, CAROL A.

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ISBN 10: 0814206255 / ISBN 13: 9780814206256
Published by Ohio State University Press, 1994
Used Condition: Good
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Former Library book. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. Bookseller Inventory # GRP80281639

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Bibliographic Details

Title: GEORGE ELIOT S SERIAL FICTION (VICTORIAN ...

Publisher: Ohio State University Press

Publication Date: 1994

Book Condition:Good

Edition: 1st Edition.

About this title

Synopsis:

Serialization was a form of publication used extensively by many Victorian writers, although it was primarily associated with more dramatic and sensational novelists than George Eliot. Reviewers of Eliot's Middlemarch noted that many serial installments would "leave their heroine in a position of perplexity or peril. Either she has run away from home, or is left on London Bridge with only fourpence-halfpenny and an opera cloak; or her soul has been softened by the charm of a dragoon, who has killed his first wife." But George Eliot offered only "the commonest incidents of daily life."
To some, Eliot seemed a figure apart, aloof not only from Victorian sensationalism but from the entire world of serial publication. Yet half of her book-length fiction originally appeared in installments, either in magazines or in eight bi-monthly or monthly individual parts. She also originally planned to serialize Adam Bede and The Mill on the Floss, but John Blackwood's reaction as he received individually the installments of "Mr Gilfil's Love-Story, " "Janet's Repentance," and the early parts of Adam Bede, along with fear of the impact of public response on her personal life, caused Eliot to change her mind. Nonetheless, like Dickens and many others, Eliot was an effective serial writer who paid close attention to the special requirements of installment structure and endings and who occasionally altered her plan for an installment in the light of public response.
Carol A. Martin traces the development of Eliot's technique as a serial writer, exposing the sometimes conflicting demands of serial and whole work and the challenges of serialization: meeting deadlines, overcoming anxieties about public response to a work in progress, and deciding whether to hold fast to artistic vision when response was negative or to reconcile artistry to commercial demands. Martin incorporates material from Eliot's manuscripts, unpublished letters and journal entries, and original reviews, most of which are not indexed or reprinted elsewhere. This engaging study will be of great interest to scholars and students of Victorian literature, especially that by women writers.

About the Author:

Carol A. Martin is professor of English at Boise State University.

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