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Gardens of Kyoto

Walbert, Kate

ISBN 10: 0684869489 / ISBN 13: 9780684869483
Published by Scribner, 2001
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Magina Books
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About this Item

Signed and inscribed by author on; NOT an ex-library book. All books expertly packed and shipped promptly. Selling Used and Rare Books since 1948. Near Fine title page. Small black mark on bottom of page edges.could be a remainder mark. A nice copy. Bookseller Inventory # 8464

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Bibliographic Details

Title: Gardens of Kyoto

Publisher: Scribner

Publication Date: 2001

Binding: Hardcover

Dust Jacket Condition: Near Fine

Signed: Signed by Author(s)

About this title

Synopsis:

Exceeding the promise of her New York Times Notable Book debut, Kate Walbert brings her prizewinning "painter's eye and poet's voice" (The Hartford Courant) to a mesmerizing story of war, romance, and grief.

I had a cousin, Randall, killed on Iwo Jima. Have I told you?

So begins Kate Walbert's beautiful and heart-breaking novel about a young woman, Ellen, coming of age in the long shadow of World War II. Forty years later she relates the events of this period, beginning with the death of her favorite cousin, Randall, with whom she had shared Easter Sundays, secrets, and, perhaps, love. In an isolated, aging Maryland farmhouse that once was a stop on the Underground Railroad, Randall had grown up among ghosts: his father, Sterling, present only in body; his mother, dead at a young age; and the apparitions of a slave family. When Ellen receives a package after Randall's death, containing his diary and a book called The Gardens of Kyoto, her bond to him is cemented, and the mysteries of his short life start to unravel.

The narrative moves back and forth between Randall's death in 1945 and the autumn six years later, when Ellen meets Lieutenant Henry Rock at a college football game on the eve of his departure for Korea. But it soon becomes apparent that Ellen's memory may be distorting reality, altered as it is by a mix of imagination and disappointment, and that the truth about Randall and Henry -- and others -- may be hidden. With lyrical, seductive prose, Walbert spins several parallel stories of the emotional damage done by war. Like the mysterious arrangements of the intricate sand, rock, and gravel gardens of Kyoto, they gracefully assemble into a single, rich mosaic.

Based on a Pushcart and O. Henry Prize-winning story, this masterful first novel establishes Walbert as a writer of astonishing elegance and power.

Review:

Nothing is quite as it should be in this first novel by Kate Walbert, author of the celebrated story collection Where She Went. Set in wartime Philadelphia, the story is told by Ellen, a character inhabiting a rather complex narrative device. Namely, she's looking back on the war years, from some future vantage point, recounting her experiences to her child. This framing device allows Walbert to create a novel in which the past is neither as innocent nor as simple as the reader assumes.

Ellen, the youngest of three sisters, lives for her annual visit to see her cousin Randall. Something in his odd-duck imaginings speaks to her, and their bond is cemented by the fact that they both have red hair. (Relationships have been built on less.) Yet this portrait of Randall is shadowed by loss; we know from the first that he will be killed in the war. Small wonder that nostalgia sweetens Ellen's account of their friendship: "Sometimes, when I think about it, I see the two of us there, Randall and me, from a different perspective, as if I were Mother walking through the door to call us for supper.... One will never grow old, never age. One will never plant tomatoes, drive automobiles, go to dances. One will never drink too much and sit alone, wishing, in the dark."

Ellen tells of meeting the father of her child, of her sister's disappearance, of a friend's abortion. These are in fact the story's recurrent motifs: vanishing women, endangered children, and men permanently damaged by war. As for the titular gardens, they make but a brief appearance, in a book Randall bequests to the narrator. Yet Walbert's description of them lends an extra resonance to her themes of distance and loss, even as we discover that Ellen has been deceiving herself--and us--all along. --Claire Dederer

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Magina Books has been owned and operated, in the same location, by the Magina family for over 50 years. George Magina (pronounced: ma jeen a) had the store built in 1948. Steve Magina has been running the shop since 1986. We have over 50,000 quality books neatly displayed in our 1,500 sq. ft. shop. We carry paperbacks, hardcovers, magazines, and some comics. 90% of our stock is used and rare, with a selection of remainders, publishers' overstocks and new books. Located just two minutes from I-75 (Southfield Rd. Exit) and just 15 minutes from Greenfield Village/Henry Ford Museum and Ford Motor Co. World Headquarters. We are approximately 20 minutes from Downtown Detroit. Come on in and browse! If you haven't visited in awhile, come see the newly renovated Magina Books!

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