Kol Kitve S. Ben-Zion.

Ben-Tsiyon, S.

Published by Hotsaat Dvir, 1960
Used / Hardbound / Quantity Available: 0
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Description:

Quarto in soiled dust jacket with short tears and edgewear, tipped in frontispiece photo, 409 pp. Text is in Hebrew. Bookseller Inventory # 37651

Bibliographic Details

Title: Kol Kitve S. Ben-Zion.
Publisher: Hotsaat Dvir
Publication Date: 1960
Binding: Hardbound
Book Condition: Good
Dust Jacket Condition: Dust Jacket Included

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1.

Ben-Tsiyon, S[imha].[Pseudonym of Simcha Alter Guttman] (1870 Teleneshty, Bessarabia -1932 Eretz Israel)
Published by Dvir, Tel Aviv, Israel (1949)
Used Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
Meir Turner
(New York, NY, U.S.A.)

Book Description Dvir, Tel Aviv, Israel, 1949. No Binding. Condition: Very Good. No Jacket. Gutman, Nahum (illustrator). In Hebrew. 28 x 22 cm. 444 pages: xxxi, 4 pages of plates, 408, {(1) pages. Tipped in frontispiece photo. Printed on good quality paper. With blue silk ribbon bookmark. Book block is solid but spine & back board are missing, front board detached and small water stain throughout, v. small tear on page 217. S. Ben Tsyion was the pen name of Simha Alter Guttman, Hebrew writer, educator, newspaper editor (Ha-Omer, Haaretz literary supplement), publisher, co-founder of Tel Aviv, and father of the writer and great artist Nachum Gutman, a few of whose illustrations appear here. He received a traditional heder education but was also exposed to Hebrew maskilic literature. His first story, "Mayn khaver" (My Friend), appeared in Yiddish (1899); he later translated it into Hebrew and published it under the title "Meshi" (Silk; 1902). His subsequent Hebrew stories appeared in prominent journals. In 1897 Ben-Tsiyon left his detested profession, cattle trading, and switched to teaching, an occupation he regarded as his true calling and in which he was very successful. In 1899 the prestigious Ha-Hinukh society invited him to Odessa to teach in the city's modernized heder, a school that quickly became a model institution. In 1900 Hayim Nahman Bialik was invited to teach under Ben-Tsiyon's supervision, and a friendship between the two men blossomed. An innovative teacher who pioneered the Ivrit be-ivrit method (teaching Hebrew and related subjects by using solely the Hebrew language), Ben-Tsiyon systematically compiled the graded Ben-'ami textbook series; the first of its many editions was issued in 1904. Ben-Tsiyon was part of the Sofre Odessa, a circle of writers who had a major influence upon the development of Hebrew culture and literature. He was an ardent follower of Mendele Moykher-Sforim, even though they differed in their views about Zionism. With the goal of revitalizing Hebrew education, Ben-Tsiyon joined with Bialik, Elhanan Leib Lewinsky, and Yehoshu'a Hana Ravnitski to establish the Moriah Press. Throughout this period, Ben-Tsiyon remained one of the most highly regarded writers of his generation, exhibiting his finest skill in the stories "Al ketseh gevul ha-yaldut" (On the Edge of Childhood; 1899), "Nefesh retsutsah" (Fragmented Soul; 1902), "Zekenim" (Elders; 1903), and "Me-'?Ever le-hayim" (Beyond Life; 1904). In 1905, with his wife and five children, Ben-Tsiyon left Odessa for Palestine, and was one of the founders of Tel Aviv in 1909, where he remained until his death in 1932. As a disciple follower of Ahad Ha-Am, Ben-Tsiyon planned to create a literary center in pre-state Israel, modeled on the Odessa circle. The scholarly journal Ha-?Omer and his continuing textbook series were part of this agenda. In 1910 he helped devise the youth periodical Moledet, which was published under the auspices of the Palestine Teachers Union. The journal was initially issued in 1911; however, by the end of its first year Ben-Tsiyon was removed from its editorial body by the teachers' central board. His failures as an editor embittered him, and he subsequently dissociated himself from cultural, public, and literary activities. His hope that in Palestine he would sustain the leadership position he had held in Odessa was dashed. Ruptures widened between Ben-Tsiyon and the workers? parties that had set the tone for literary standards in Palestine, as well as personally between him and their leaders (including Berl Katsenelson). These rejections led him to associate with "civilian circles" whose contribution to cultural activity in those years was marginal. Still, he continued to compile his textbook series Ben-'ami. In 1914, just before World War I, he published Kol ketavav (All His Writings) in two volumes, and when the British occupied Eretz Israel, he edited the literary supplement Shai shel sifrut (The Gift of Literature), which was attached to the daily ?adashot meha-arets (1918?1919), and Ha-Ezrah, an anthology . . , , Seller Inventory # 013276

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2.

Ben-Tsiyon, S[imha].[Pseudonym of Simcha Alter Guttman] (1870 Teleneshty, Bessarabia -1932 Eretz Israel)
Published by Dvir, Tel Aviv, Israel (1949)
Used Hardcover Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
Meir Turner
(New York, NY, U.S.A.)

Book Description Dvir, Tel Aviv, Israel, 1949. Hardcover. Condition: Very Good. Gutman, Nahum (illustrator). In Hebrew. 28 x 22 cm. 444 pages: xxxi, 4 pages of plates, 408, {(1) pages. Tipped in frontispiece photo. Printed on high quality paper. With white silk ribbon bookmark. In very good condition, except that the spine is soiled and a bit damaged. S. Ben Tsyion was the pen name of Simha Alter Guttman, Hebrew writer, educator, newspaper editor (Ha-Omer, Haaretz literary supplement), publisher, co-founder of Tel Aviv, and father of the writer and great artist Nachum Gutman, a few of whose illustrations appear here. He received a traditional heder education but was also exposed to Hebrew maskilic literature. His first story, "Mayn khaver" (My Friend), appeared in Yiddish (1899); he later translated it into Hebrew and published it under the title "Meshi" (Silk; 1902). His subsequent Hebrew stories appeared in prominent journals. In 1897 Ben-Tsiyon left his detested profession, cattle trading, and switched to teaching, an occupation he regarded as his true calling and in which he was very successful. In 1899 the prestigious Ha-Hinukh society invited him to Odessa to teach in the city's modernized heder, a school that quickly became a model institution. In 1900 Hayim Nahman Bialik was invited to teach under Ben-Tsiyon's supervision, and a friendship between the two men blossomed. An innovative teacher who pioneered the Ivrit be- ivrit method (teaching Hebrew and related subjects by using solely the Hebrew language), Ben-Tsiyon systematically compiled the graded Ben-'ami textbook series; the first of its many editions was issued in 1904. Ben-Tsiyon was part of the Sofre Odessa, a circle of writers who had a major influence upon the development of Hebrew culture and literature. He was an ardent follower of Mendele Moykher-Sforim, even though they differed in their views about Zionism. With the goal of revitalizing Hebrew education, Ben-Tsiyon joined with Bialik, Elhanan Leib Lewinsky, and Yehoshu'a Hana Ravnitski to establish the Moriah Press. Throughout this period, Ben-Tsiyon remained one of the most highly regarded writers of his generation, exhibiting his finest skill in the stories "Al ketseh gevul ha-yaldut" (On the Edge of Childhood; 1899), "Nefesh retsutsah" (Fragmented Soul; 1902), "Zekenim" (Elders; 1903), and "Me-'?Ever le-hayim" (Beyond Life; 1904). In 1905, with his wife and five children, Ben-Tsiyon left Odessa for Palestine, and was one of the founders of Tel Aviv in 1909, where he remained until his death in 1932. As a disciple follower of Ahad Ha-Am, Ben-Tsiyon planned to create a literary center in pre-state Israel, modeled on the Odessa circle. The scholarly journal Ha-?Omer and his continuing textbook series were part of this agenda. In 1910 he helped devise the youth periodical Moledet, which was published under the auspices of the Palestine Teachers Union. The journal was initially issued in 1911; however, by the end of its first year Ben-Tsiyon was removed from its editorial body by the teachers' central board. His failures as an editor embittered him, and he subsequently dissociated himself from cultural, public, and literary activities. His hope that in Palestine he would sustain the leadership position he had held in Odessa was dashed. Ruptures widened between Ben-Tsiyon and the workers? parties that had set the tone for literary standards in Palestine, as well as personally between him and their leaders (including Berl Katsenelson). These rejections led him to associate with "civilian circles" whose contribution to cultural activity in those years was marginal. Still, he continued to compile his textbook series Ben-'ami. In 1914, just before World War I, he published Kol ketavav (All His Writings) in two volumes, and when the British occupied Eretz Israel, he edited the literary supplement Shai shel sifrut (The Gift of Literature), which was attached to the daily ?adashot meha-arets (1918?1919), and Ha-Ezrah, an anthology "dedicated to literature, science, and contemporary questions" (1919?1920). , , Seller Inventory # 010913

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

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US$ 18.00
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Shipping: US$ 5.00
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