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Limiting United States Involvement in the Indochina War: A Digest of Amendments Proposes and/or Passed in the Ninety-Second Congress

Christopher, Luella Sue

Published by Library of Congress Legislative Reference Service, Washington, DC, 1972
Soft cover
From Ground Zero Books, Ltd. (Silver Spring, MD, U.S.A.)

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[4], 67 p. Map This is a product of The Library of Congress Legislative Reference Service, with designators JX1428 US D and 72-248 F. The author was a Foreign Affairs Analyst with the Foreign Affairs Division. From WIkipedia: "The Congressional Research Service (CRS), known as Congress's think tank, is a public policy research arm of the United States Congress. As a legislative branch agency within the Library of Congress, CRS works primarily and directly for Members of Congress, their Committees and staff on a confidential, nonpartisan basis. Its staff of approximately 600 employees includes lawyers, economists, reference librarians, and social, natural, and physical scientists. In fiscal year 2012, CRS was appropriated a budget of roughly $106.8 million by Congress. CRS is joined by two major congressional support agencies. The Congressional Budget Office provides Congress with budget-related information, reports on fiscal, budgetary, and programmatic issues, and analyses of budget policy options, costs, and effects. The Government Accountability Office assists Congress in reviewing and monitoring the activities of government by conducting independent audits, investigations, and evaluations of federal programs. Collectively, the three agencies employ more than 4, 000 people. CRS reports are widely regarded as in depth, accurate, objective, and timely, but as a matter of policy they are not made available to members of the public by CRS, except in certain circumstances. There have been numerous attempts to pass legislation requiring all reports to be made available online, most recently in 2012, but none have been enacted. Instead, the public must request individual reports from their Senators and Representatives in Congress, purchase them from private vendors, or search for them in various web archives of previously released documents.In 1914, Senator Robert LaFollette and Representative John M. Nelson, both of Wisconsin, promoted the inclusion in the legislative, executive, and judicial appropriations act of a provision directing the establishment of a special reference unit within the Library of Congress. [7] Building upon a concept developed by the New York State Library in 1890, and the Wisconsin Legislative Reference Library in 1901, they were motivated by Progressive era ideas about the importance of the acquisition of knowledge for an informed and independent legislature The move also reflected the expanding role of the librarian and the professionalization of the profession. The new department was charged with responding to congressional requests for information The legislation authorized the Librarian of Congress, Herbert Putnam, to employ competent persons to prepare such indexes, digests, and compilations of laws as may be required for Congress and other official use.(The intent behind the creation of the agency can be derived from U.S. Senate, Committee on the Library, Legislative Drafting Bureau and Reference Division, 62d Cong., 3d sess., 1913, S. Rept.1271. ) Renamed the Legislative Reference Service and given a permanent authorization with the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946, it assisted Congress primarily by providing facts and publications and by transmitting research and analysis done largely by other government agencies, private organizations, and individual scholars. The Library of Congress, the home of CRS, had experimented during the 1940s with unrestricted publication Public Affairs Bulletins, which were produced by staff of the Legislative Reference Service, and devoted to various public policy issues. They were promoted by Archibald MacLeish, the Librarian of Congress, and, among other topics, addressed timely policy issues, such as American national defense. About 100 Public Affairs Bulletins were generated before congressional appropriators ended their production in 1951. The renaming under the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1970 reflected the service's changing mission:. Good. Cover has. Bookseller Inventory # 67367

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Bibliographic Details

Title: Limiting United States Involvement in the ...

Publisher: Library of Congress Legislative Reference Service, Washington, DC

Publication Date: 1972

Binding: Wraps

Edition: Presumed first edition/first printing.

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