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Origins of the Nevada Test Site. DOE MA-0518

Fehner, Terrence R., and Gosling, F. G.

Published by U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC, 2002
Condition: Very good Soft cover
From Ground Zero Books, Ltd. (Silver Spring, MD, U.S.A.)

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About this Item

Quart. vi, 95, [3] pages. Wraps. Illustrations. Maps. Endnotes. Slight wear to covers. This book was written in conjunction with the 50th anniversary commemoration of the Nevada Test Site, and represents a unique partnership between the U.S. Department of Energy's Nevada Operations Office (which provided the initial impetus for the project), the Office of Defense Programs of the Department's National Nuclear Security Administration (which provided funding for printing the history), and the History Division of the Department's Executive Secretariat (which researched and wrote the history). Gosling was a former Chief Historian for the Department of Energy and Fehner succeeded him into that position. The contents include a description and early history of the Nevada Test Site, the birth of the nuclear age, the search for a Continental Test Site, The Ranger Series, and the Legacy of the Nevada Test Site. The Nevada National Security Site, previously the Nevada Test Site (NTS), is a United States Department of Energy reservation located in southeastern Nye County, Nevada, about 65 miles northwest of the city of Las Vegas. Formerly known as the Nevada Proving Grounds, the site was established on 11 January 1951 for the testing of nuclear devices, covering approximately 1,360 square miles of desert and mountainous terrain. Nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site began with a 1-kiloton-of-TNT (4.2 TJ) bomb dropped on Frenchman Flat on 27 January 1951. During the 1950s, the mushroom clouds from the 100 atmospheric tests could be seen for almost 100 mi. St. George, Utah, received the brunt of the fallout of above-ground nuclear testing in the Yucca Flats/Nevada Test Site. Winds routinely carried the fallout of these tests directly through St. George and southern Utah. The vast majority-828 of the 928 total nuclear tests-were underground. The Nevada Test Site contains 28 areas, 1,100 buildings, 400 miles of paved roads, 300 miles of unpaved roads, ten heliports, and two airstrips. The Nevada Test Site was established as a 680-square-mile area by President Harry S. Truman on December 18, 1950, within the Nellis Air Force Gunnery and Bombing Range. The Nevada Test Site was the primary testing location of American nuclear devices from 1951 to 1992; 928 announced nuclear tests occurred there. Of those, 828 were underground. (Sixty-two of the underground tests included multiple, simultaneous nuclear detonations, adding 93 detonations and bringing the total number of NTS nuclear detonations to 1,021, of which 921 were underground.) The site is covered with subsidence craters from the testing. The NTS was the United States' primary location for tests in the 500-to-1,000 kt (2,100-to-4,200 TJ) range. 126 tests were conducted elsewhere, including most larger tests. Many of these occurred at the Pacific Proving Grounds in the Marshall Islands. . The last atmospheric test detonation at the Nevada Test Site was "Little Feller I" of Operation Sunbeam, on 17 July 1962. Although the United States did not ratify the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, it honors the articles of the treaty, and underground testing of weapons ended as of 23 September 1992. Subcritical tests not involving a critical mass continue. One notable test shot was the "Sedan" shot of Operation Storax on 6 July 1962, a 104-kiloton-of-TNT (440 TJ) shot for Operation Plowshare, which sought to prove that nuclear weapons could be used for peaceful means in creating bays or canals. It created a crater 1,280 feet wide and 320 feet deep that can still be seen today. While there are no longer any explosive tests of nuclear weapons at the site, there is still subcritical testing, used to determine the viability of the United States' aging nuclear arsenal. Additionally, the site is the location of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex, which sorts and stores low-level radioactive waste that is not transuranic and has a half life not longer than 20 years. The Radiological. Bookseller Inventory # 73650

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Bibliographic Details

Title: Origins of the Nevada Test Site. DOE MA-0518

Publisher: U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC

Publication Date: 2002

Binding: Wraps

Book Condition: Very good

Edition: Second Printing [stated].

Store Description

Founded and operated by trained historians, Ground Zero Books, Ltd., serves the book collector, the scholar, and institutions. We focus on the individual, and pride ourselves on our personal service. Please contact us with your wants, as we have many books not yet listed in our database.

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Books are subject to prior sale. Please ask us to hold a book for you before you
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The mailing address for Ground Zero Books, Ltd. (a subchapter-S corporation) is
P.O. Box 8369, Silver Spring, MD 20907-8369. You can reach us by phone at 301-
585-1471, by fax at 301-920-0253, or by e-mail at gzbooksltd@aol.com. Ground Zero
Books, Ltd., is owned & operated by R. Alan Lewis & Lynne Haims.


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