PLUTARCH'S LIVES, Translated From The Original Greek; With Notes Critical and Historical; and a Life of Plutarch. By John Langhorne, D.D. and William Langhorne, A.M.

Plutarch]

Published by London Printed for J. Mawman, F.C. & J. Rivington et. al 1810, 1810
Hardcover
From Buddenbrooks, Inc. ABAA (Newburyport, MA, U.S.A.)

AbeBooks Seller Since August 19, 1998

Quantity Available: 1

About this Item

8 volumes. The new edition, with corrections and additions. Small 8vo, full contemporary polished calf, the spines with gilt bands separating compartment decorated with central gilt ornamental devices, contrasting lettering labels of red and black morocco lettered and numbered in gilt. A very fine, handsome and complete set with virtually no evidence of age or wear. A remarkably well preserved antiquarian set. A VERY FINE SET, REMARKABLY SO, AND HANDSOMELY BOUND AT THE TIME. A lovely set in full contemporary calf binding. The Langhornes' translation is considered more correct than North's spirited version and more even than the translation called Dryden's. Lowndes considered it an "accurate and elegant version". This is a pleasing, gentlemanly and very well-preserved set. Plutarch continues to be one of our most important sources for the history of Greece and Rome and is also well-known as a primary source for the plots of Shakespeare's classical plays and for numerous passages in the non-Roman ones. The great bard relied almost exclusively on Plutarch’s writings for the historical background of ancient Rome. The Lives of Plutarch (ca. AD 50 - ca. 125) was one of the most influential works of antiquity, and was the most popular work at the time of the Renaissance. The Lives illustrated the moral character of Plutarch's subjects through a series of anecdotes; in England they served as a source-book for Shakespeare's Roman plays, a virtual gold mine of plots, as well as providing numerous passages in the non-Roman ones. The Bard relied almost exclusively on Plutarch’s writings for the historical background of ancient Rome. Later Plutarch provided the source for Otway and Addison. They also served as a model for Isaac Walton's "Lives" (1670); Dryden gave a pioneer analysis of their style and structure in his Life of Plutarch (1683), and in America the Founding Fathers turned to them for models of republican virtue. In this monumental historical work, Plutarch relates biographies of 50 Greek and Roman luminaries, twenty-three pairs of lives (nineteen of them with comparisons attached) and also four single lives. They include lives of Solon, Themistocles, Aristeides, Pericles, Alcibiades, Nicias, Demosthenes, Philopoemen, Timoleon, Dion, Alexander, Pyrrhus, Marius, Sulla, Pompey, Mark Antony, Brutus, Julius Caesar, and Cicero. Of the later Roman emperors, only the lives of Galba and Otho survive. Plutarch's object is to bring out the moral character in each case, rather than to relate the political events of his time; hence his full treatment of the subject's education and natural disposition, and his relation of anecdotes calculated to reveal the nature of the man, 'a light occasion, a word, or some sport' which 'makes men's natural dispositions more plain than the famous battles won, in which ten thousand men may be killed'. Although Plutarch may have at times distorted the truth in order to exemplify virtue or vice, in general he is as reliable as his sources, and always very valuable. He shows no bias or unfairness in his treatment of Greeks and Romans, no flattery of the now dominant power of Rome or vanity in the past glories of his own nation. He believed in the compatibility of Rome the ruler and Greece the educator. The Lives contain, besides interesting anecdotes, many memorable historical passages: the catastrophe in the Peloponnesian War of the Athenian expedition to Syracuse (Nicias), Pompey's defeat by Caesar and subsequent murder the death of the younger Cato, and the suicide of Otho. There are also great battle-pieces: the victory of the Roman general Marius over the German Cimbri, the victory of the Corinthian general Timoleon over the Carthaginians at the river Crimisus, the siege of Syracuse (when Archimedes was there) by the Roman Marcellus; and striking descriptions of a quite different kind, of the happy state of Italy under Numa, of Sicily pacified by Timoleon, and of Cleopatra sailing up the river Cydnus on. Bookseller Inventory # 27476

Ask Seller a Question

Bibliographic Details

Title: PLUTARCH'S LIVES, Translated From The ...

Publisher: London Printed for J. Mawman, F.C. & J. Rivington et. al 1810

Publication Date: 1810

Binding: Hardcover

Store Description

Buddenbrooks has one of the finest selections of fine and rare books in several fields and we invite you to visit us at our new premises in Newburyport, Massachusetts where have an open "brick and mortar" bookshop. We are also available to meet with clients in Boston by appointment only, where we have maintained a presence for over 40 years. We offer a search service for any books, old or new, which you may have been unable to find. Please call for further information, we look forward to hearing from you.

Visit Seller's Storefront

Terms of Sale:

All books are offered subject to prior sale. If you prefer
you may mail us a check drawn on a U.S. bank or subsidiary paying
branch in the U.S. Massachusetts residents only, please include 5%
sales tax. All books are returnable within 10 days, we ask that you notify
us via fax, phone or email in advance. Buddenbrooks, Inc. is located at 21 Pleasant Street, On the
Courtyard, in Newburyport, MA 01950 USA. All correspondences should be sent to this address to the
attention of Martin Weinkle or Step...

More Information
Shipping Terms:

Shipping costs are based on books weighing 2.2 LB, or 1 KG. If your book order is heavy or oversized, we may contact you to let you know extra shipping is required.

List this Seller's Books

Payment Methods
accepted by seller

Visa Mastercard American Express

Check Money Order Cash Bank/Wire Transfer