Stock Image

Photographing Architecture and Interiors

Julius Shulman

15 ratings by Goodreads
ISBN 10: 1890449075 / ISBN 13: 9781890449070
Published by Balcony Press, Los Angele, 2000
Condition: Very Good Hardcover
From Moe's Books (Berkeley, CA, U.S.A.)

AbeBooks Seller Since May 26, 2003 Seller Rating 4-star rating

Quantity Available: 1

Buy Used
Price: US$ 100.00 Convert Currency
Shipping: US$ 3.99 Within U.S.A. Destination, rates & speeds
Add to basket

30 Day Return Policy

About this Item

Cloth. Dust jacket with sun fading. Bookseller Inventory # 65570

Ask Seller a Question

Bibliographic Details

Title: Photographing Architecture and Interiors

Publisher: Balcony Press, Los Angele

Publication Date: 2000

Binding: Hardcover

Book Condition:Very Good

Dust Jacket Condition: Good

About this title

Synopsis:

Julius Shulman's long career photographing great architectural works with depth, passion, drama, and an instinct for the architect's intentions has ensured his present status as one of the world's preeminent architectural photographers. His eloquent photos interpreting the structures of Richard Neutra and other early modernists helped the viewing public to understand these revolutionary buildings, and brought prominence to modernist practitioners who might otherwise have been considered eccentric. Frank Lloyd Wright once said that no better photos had ever been taken of Taliesin West than those by Shulman. Photographing Architecture and Interiors, published in 1962, is Shulman's first book, and he still considers it to be his most genuine reflection on the profession and on his own artistic philosophy. This title is an exact reprint of that now-classic publication. All of Shulman's famous photographs have here been reproduced from original prints, giving the images a crispness and luminosity not seen even in the 1962 edition. The introduction by Richard Neutra, perhaps Shulman's most important client and avid supporter, has been preserved; also included is a new foreword by Shulman himself.

Review:

The long and illustrious career of architectural photographer Julius Shulman is a case study in how being in the right place at the right time can make one an eyewitness to history. In 1936, Shulman, a young slacker with a fondness for snapping pictures, took a few casual shots of a Los Angeles house that recently had been designed by a young architect whose wife was acquainted with Shulman's sister. The house happened to be the Kun House, and the architect, who liked the shots and commissioned more, happened to be the fledgling Richard Neutra. In short order, Neutra arranged for Shulman to photograph the works of Raphael Soriano, Rudolph Schindler, Gregory Ain, J.R. Davidson, and other colleagues who were pioneering the International style on the West Coast and throughout the U.S. By the 1950s, Shulman was shooting the work of Mies and Wright--by 1962, when Shulman published the first edition of this guide to the craft and business of architectural photography, his work was as inextricably linked with the modern movement in design as was Berenice Abbott's with Paris's Lost Generation.

For both those who are and aren't familiar with Shulman's oeuvre, this delightful updated edition of his stolidly titled Photographing Architecture and Interiorsmakes it completely clear why and how he forged that artistic and professional alliance with the masters of modernism. As a how-to book for both budding and experienced architectural photographers, it's still invaluable. Camera technology and changes in the profession itself might have dated some of the text here, but most of it focuses on principles and techniques that transcend matters of film- or camera-make, and addresses every possible aspect of the craft--from composition, angles, lenses, and lighting (for both exteriors and interiors, which Shulman always saw as contiguous) to shooting with both black-and-white and color film, darkroom manipulation, and special tips for residential, commercial, and landscape work. But, even if the book had no main text, the hundreds of shots of his own work (and their excellent "how I got that shot" captions) would speak and educate for themselves, and are what make this book such a classic for architectural shutterbugs and general lovers of modern architecture alike. It's simply a dramatically arranged and lighted panorama of the boldest design of the postwar era, with a particular emphasis on the glamorous residential projects of a brashly affluent Southern California, where Shulman did most of his work. The book abounds with outdoor and indoor shots of the sleekly linear homes of Soriano, Wright, Thornton Ladd, William Pereira, John Lautner, Cliff May, and many others; all of their drop-dead-cool rec rooms, swimming pools, pavilions and terraces, glass walls, and surrounding hillscapes captured with angles and lighting that compare to Orson Welles or Hitchcock in their drama and intrigue. There's also great representation of Shulman's commercial work here, too--to this day, no one has made such femmes fatales of corporate modernism as the Seagram Building, Lever House, and Pei's Mile-High Center in Denver look as sexy as Shulman did, and his shots of Charles Luckman's high-tech industrial shrines, like General Dynamics Astronautics in San Diego, are a sheer blast from an era that was besotted with the glamour of science, space, and the Bomb. There's a terrific interview with Shulman, up front, and the book concludes with his walk-through case study of the shoot for an entire Bel Air house.

But it's Shulman's decades-long interpretation of the work of his first client, Neutra, that attained a perfection on the level of such other collaborations of the era as Nelson Riddle's Capitol arrangements for Frank Sinatra or Hubert de Givenchy's couture for Audrey Hepburn. Fittingly, in the eloquent introduction that he wrote for this book, Neutra said of an artist of Shulman's rank, "With one gesture, he may evoke untold illusions ... [he] can and does speak to human souls." To wit, this timeless volume opens with those fateful first shots of the Kun House, its gleamingly white and shockingly stark facades staring out over the raw hills of Southern California. No matter that Shulman "snapped" them with his Eastman Vest-Pocket Camera; amid his vertiginous angles and bold chiaroscuro, one senses that something big is about to happen in American architecture. Of course, as we all know now, something did happen--and, as this update of an architectural classic makes clear, no one documented it as lucidly or stylishly as the richly talented Mr. Shulman. --Timothy Murphy

"About this title" may belong to another edition of this title.

Store Description

Moe's Books has been selling new, used, and antiquarian books for over fifty years. Our store has four floors, a separate rare book room, and over 300,000 books. We are located in the heart of Berkeley, four blocks from the University of California campus on historic Telegraph Avenue. Please check out website for more information about the store and our event information. We have many of our readings available as free audio downloads. You can also contact us with want lists or questions about our inventory.

Visit Seller's Storefront

Terms of Sale:

Books may be returned only if not as described.


Shipping Terms:

Orders usually ship within 2 business days. Shipping costs are based on books weighing 2.2 LB, or 1 KG. If your book order is heavy or over-sized, we may contact you to let you know that extra shipping is required. International shipping rates are based on the book being able to be shipped via Global Priority. Over-sized or heavy books to be shipped by air mail will require additional postage. Additional postage is quoted at cost.

List this Seller's Books

Payment Methods
accepted by seller

Visa Mastercard American Express