The Popular History of England: An; Illustrated History of Society and Government from the Earliest Period to Our Own Times, Vol. 5 (Classic Reprint)

Knight, Charles

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Title: The Popular History of England: An; ...
Publisher: Forgotten Books
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1.

Charles Knight
Published by Forgotten Books, United States (2017)
ISBN 10: 1330172361 ISBN 13: 9781330172360
New Paperback Quantity Available: 10
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Book Description Forgotten Books, United States, 2017. Paperback. Book Condition: New. 229 x 152 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. Excerpt from The Popular History of England, Vol. 5: An Illustrated History of Society and Government From the Earliest Period to Our Own Times Manchester, in the early part of the reign of Charles II., was reckoned to contain six thousand people.* Fifty years later its population was esti mated at fifty thousand but this estimate included the suburb, or village, on the other side of the bridge. 1 There were no very precise data for this estimate, beyond the manifest increase of buildings and of trade; the increase of inhabitants having demanded a new church, that of St. Anne. If this calculation be just, as I believe it really is, writes Defoe, you have here an open village, which is greater and more populous than most cities in England: neither York, Lincoln, Chester, Salisbury, Winchester, Worcester, Gloucester, no, nor Norwich itself, can come up to it. I The social condi tion of Manchester, at the end of the seventeenth century, was very primitive. Its manufactures of fustian, girth web, ticking, tapes, were carried on by small masters, who had apprentices residing in their houses. These lads were employed in the servile offices of turning the warping mills, and carry ing packages from place to place. The master and his young men breakfasted together upon water-pottage, boiled thick, and a bowl of milk stood upon the table, into which all dipped their spoons. In 1702 there was the per tentous entry in a tradesman s household-book, of a sum expended for tea and sugar. In the reign of george i. It was held that the luxury of the age will be the ruin of the nation and one of the proofs of this degeneracy was that the wholesome breakfast of water-gruel and milk-pottage is changed for coffee and tea. H The present mill-owners of Manchester, each with his enormous transactions, represented by hundreds of thousands of pounds in a year, furnish a remarkable contrast to those travelling trades men whom we call Manchester-men. To every town the fustians and small things called Manchester-ware were borne by horse-packs; the Manchester men being, saving their wealth, a kind of pedlars who carry their goods themselves to the country-shopkeepers everywhere. 1[ The perils of their land journeys were not tri?ing The horse is driven away by some sudden ?ood, or falls down in the water and spoils the goods. Manchester had few rival neighbours in its trade of fustians and dimities, in which a little hand-spun cotton was used. Towns such as Bolton, to which the cotton manufacture had reached, did not presume to compete with Manchester s warping-mills, and Manchester s looms, which work twenty-four laces at a time, as is recorded with wondering commendation. At Bury, the cotton manufacture was ended, and the woollen manufacture of coarse sorts begun. At Preston, the tourist had come beyond the trading part of the country. This gay town, known as Proud Preston, was full of attornies, proctors, and notaries. h Between the trading towns there was very imperfect communi cation and until the Mersey, the Irwell, and the Weaver were made navi gable, land-carriage to and from Liverpool was an important addition to the cost of exported and imported goods. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. Bookseller Inventory # AAV9781330172360

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2.

Charles Knight
Published by Forgotten Books, United States (2016)
ISBN 10: 1330172361 ISBN 13: 9781330172360
New Paperback Quantity Available: 10
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Book Description Forgotten Books, United States, 2016. Paperback. Book Condition: New. 229 x 152 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.Excerpt from The Popular History of England, Vol. 5: An Illustrated History of Society and Government From the Earliest Period to Our Own Times We are entering upon that period of our national progress in which England is very slowly developing itself into a manufacturing and commercial country. The great features of that progress, and its accompanying changes in the character of the population, must ever be borne in mind when we attempt to trace the political history of the eighteenth century. This gradual development of her resources is not a mere accident in England s career. It constitutes the most important feature of her advancing political condition. It requires to be thoroughly understood, if we would rightly understand the circumstances which have given us our present place amongst the nations. We propose to offer a picture, derived indeed from scattered and imperfect materials, but with some approximation to exactness, of the industry, and the consequent condition and character of the people, during the period from the Revolution of 1688 to the accession of the house of Brunswick. Some of our authorities extend through the reign of George I. But there were few changes of invention or discovery to mark a new epoch of industry as immediately following the close of the reign of Anne. It was the period before steam-engines and navigable canals - the period before the cotton trade - the period before scientific husbandry in its humblest form. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. Bookseller Inventory # AAV9781330172360

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Charles Knight
Published by Forgotten Books (2015)
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Book Description Forgotten Books, 2015. Book Condition: New. This item is printed on demand for shipment within 3 working days. Bookseller Inventory # LP9781330172360

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Charles Knight
Published by Forgotten Books, United States (2017)
ISBN 10: 1330172361 ISBN 13: 9781330172360
New Paperback Quantity Available: 10
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Book Description Forgotten Books, United States, 2017. Paperback. Book Condition: New. 229 x 152 mm. Language: English . This book usually ship within 10-15 business days and we will endeavor to dispatch orders quicker than this where possible. Brand New Book. Excerpt from The Popular History of England, Vol. 5: An Illustrated History of Society and Government From the Earliest Period to Our Own Times Manchester, in the early part of the reign of Charles II., was reckoned to contain six thousand people.* Fifty years later its population was esti mated at fifty thousand but this estimate included the suburb, or village, on the other side of the bridge. 1 There were no very precise data for this estimate, beyond the manifest increase of buildings and of trade; the increase of inhabitants having demanded a new church, that of St. Anne. If this calculation be just, as I believe it really is, writes Defoe, you have here an open village, which is greater and more populous than most cities in England: neither York, Lincoln, Chester, Salisbury, Winchester, Worcester, Gloucester, no, nor Norwich itself, can come up to it. I The social condi tion of Manchester, at the end of the seventeenth century, was very primitive. Its manufactures of fustian, girth web, ticking, tapes, were carried on by small masters, who had apprentices residing in their houses. These lads were employed in the servile offices of turning the warping mills, and carry ing packages from place to place. The master and his young men breakfasted together upon water-pottage, boiled thick, and a bowl of milk stood upon the table, into which all dipped their spoons. In 1702 there was the per tentous entry in a tradesman s household-book, of a sum expended for tea and sugar. In the reign of george i. It was held that the luxury of the age will be the ruin of the nation and one of the proofs of this degeneracy was that the wholesome breakfast of water-gruel and milk-pottage is changed for coffee and tea. H The present mill-owners of Manchester, each with his enormous transactions, represented by hundreds of thousands of pounds in a year, furnish a remarkable contrast to those travelling trades men whom we call Manchester-men. To every town the fustians and small things called Manchester-ware were borne by horse-packs; the Manchester men being, saving their wealth, a kind of pedlars who carry their goods themselves to the country-shopkeepers everywhere. 1[ The perils of their land journeys were not tri?ing The horse is driven away by some sudden ?ood, or falls down in the water and spoils the goods. Manchester had few rival neighbours in its trade of fustians and dimities, in which a little hand-spun cotton was used. Towns such as Bolton, to which the cotton manufacture had reached, did not presume to compete with Manchester s warping-mills, and Manchester s looms, which work twenty-four laces at a time, as is recorded with wondering commendation. At Bury, the cotton manufacture was ended, and the woollen manufacture of coarse sorts begun. At Preston, the tourist had come beyond the trading part of the country. This gay town, known as Proud Preston, was full of attornies, proctors, and notaries. h Between the trading towns there was very imperfect communi cation and until the Mersey, the Irwell, and the Weaver were made navi gable, land-carriage to and from Liverpool was an important addition to the cost of exported and imported goods. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. Bookseller Inventory # LIE9781330172360

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