Revista trimestral micrografica.

RAMON Y CAJAL, Santiago

Published by Nicolas Moya, 1896
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5 vols. in 3. 8vo. [iv], 203, [1]; [iv], 192; [iv], 204; [iv], 200; [iv], 198 pp. With 4 plates and 276 text illustrations, many in colour. Modern half cloth over marbled boards; an excellent set with the signature of T. Ziehen on the first blank leaf. First edition. This most valuable journal was created by Ramon y Cajal in order to publish his own scientific research and to serve to encourage his pupils. It is extremely rare with only sixty copies printed. As initially conceived by Cajal, the Revista trimestral micrográfica was published for five years as a quarterly review of normal and pathological histology before being taken over by the University of Madrid, who changed the name to Trabajos del Laboratorio de Investigactiones. Many of Cajal's important papers were published in his journal and formed the critical mass necessary for him to become a vocal proponent in favour of the independence of neural units, along with the principle of dynamic polarization in which would eventually become the Neuron Doctrine.Ramon y Cajal (1852-1934) was the founder of modern neurology. His neuron theory is one of the principal scientific conquests of the twentieth century. It has withstood, with scarcely any modifications, the passage of more than a hundred years, being reaffirmed by new technologies, such as the electron microscopy. Bookseller Inventory #

Bibliographic Details

Title: Revista trimestral micrografica.
Publisher: Nicolas Moya
Publication Date: 1896
Edition: FIRST EDITIONS

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1.

SANTIAGO RAMÓN Y CAJAL
Published by Madrid (1909)
Used Rústica Quantity Available: 1
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Ziggurat Libros
(Madrid, MAD, Spain)
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Book Description Madrid, 1909. Rústica. Book Condition: Muy Bien. Imprenta y Librería de Nicolás Moya, Madrid, 1909. Encuadernación en rústica, 284 págs., 26.5 x 17.5 cm. Cubierta delantera parcialmente restaurada (practicamente inapreciable), por lo demás en perfecto estado. Bookseller Inventory # 002995

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RAMÓN y CAJAL, Santiago
Published by Madrid: Nicolás Moya, 1896. (1896)
Used Softcover First Edition Quantity Available: 1
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Scientia Books, ABAA
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Book Description Madrid: Nicolás Moya, 1896., 1896. 2 leaves [title page for Vol. I, contents leaf for Vol. I], pp. 145-203, [1, explanatory text for plates]; 4 plates. Original wrappers. Ink stamp "Histologie/ Collège de France" on front wrapper. Ink call no. on front wrapper. Marginal browning of text leaves. Mostly unopened. Very Good. Entire issue offered. First Edition "Methylene Blue in the Nerve Centers." In his autobiography, Ramón y Cajal writes: "During the year 1896 my activity rose to another peak like that of 1890, running feverishly through various divergent channels and expanding in some cases subjects already taken up. . . . In the later months of the year I frequently turned with new ardour to matters which I had studied before; but this time I made use by preference of the valuable method of Ehrlich. . . . As is well known, this procedure has the inestimable value of staining the nerve fibres and cells in vivo, or immediately after death, so that they stand out vigorously with a strong blue colour. Unfortunately the vital reaction of Ehrlich is so delicate and ephemeral that almost all fixing agents, and of course, alcohol, decolorize it. It is true that the use of the new fixative, ammonium molybdate, introduced into the technique by A. Bethe, made possible the cutting of sections with the microtome, though with considerable inconvenience; but, with the exception of a few interesting experiments of Dogiel on the cerebellum of birds, no one had succeeded in obtaining, either by sectioning or by the examination of macerated pieces, instructive preparations of the central organs (cerebellum, cerebrum, spinal cord, etc.) of mammals. I proposed at any cost to examine the structure of the spinal cord, the cerebellum, the cerebrum, the hippocampus, and other organs, by the methylene blue method, not only in the lower vertebrates but also in mammals. And, in fact, after several attempts, which led me to modify Bethe’s method of fixation, I secured regularly sections which showed the organizations of these regions pretty well. It was not only the stimulus of scientific curiosity which led me to study Ehrlich's technique thoroughly, but there entered largely into my determination the desire, nay more, the urgent necessity to check through the revelations of a method which colours the cells and fibres while almost alive, the very clear and decisive, but somewhat capricious pictures produced by the method of Golgi. For, although most scientists accepted with complete confidence the very clear images of silver chromate, there were sceptics who suggested the possibility that some arrangements were artifacts, that is metallic deposits which did not correspond with preexistent structures. It was therefore, absolutely necessary to show to everybody clear and decisive images, both of the spines on the dendrites and of other morphological features which I had discovered, by the use of technical methods entirely different from that of Golgi. It was to this end that I directed persistent efforts at the close of 1896 and for almost the whole of 1897, during which time I made use almost exclusively of the methylene blue method of Ehrlich. My efforts, which were crowned with complete success, were varied, one turning upon the collateral spines, which had been denied, another concerning the neurons in the molecular layer of the cerebral cortex, and finally, the most extensive and important embracing the cerebellum, the cerebral cortex, the hippocampus, the spinal cord, etc. . . . . In the most extensive and comprehensive paper [offered here], which was adorned with several phototypes, I succeeded in establishing, without the least possible doubt, the preexistence in the adult (rabbit, cat, dog, frog, and others) of the. Bookseller Inventory # 15191

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