Stock Image

Sacred Ritual: West Semitic Calendars A Study of the West Semitic Ritual Calendars in Leviticus 23 and the Akkadian Text Emar 446

ISBN 10: 1575068265 / ISBN 13: 9781575068268
Published by Eisenbrauns
New Condition: New Hardcover
From Scholar's Source (Warsaw, IN, U.S.A.)

AbeBooks Seller Since July 25, 2008

Seller Rating 4-star rating

Quantity Available: > 20

Buy New
Price: US$ 59.50 Convert Currency
Shipping: US$ 4.95 Within U.S.A. Destination, Rates & Speeds
Add to basket

30 Day Return Policy

About this Item

Israelite festival calendar texts (Exod 23; 34; Lev 23; Num 28â"29; Deut 16; and Ezek 45) share many features; however, there are also differences. Some of the most-often-cited differences are the following: festival dates, festival locations, date of the New Year, festival timing, and festival names. Scholars have explored these distinctions, and many have concluded that different sources (authors/redactors) wrote the various calendars at different times in Israelite history. Scholars use these dissimilarities to argue that Lev 23 was written in the exilic or postexilic era. Babcock offers a new translation and analysis of a second-millennium B.C. multimonth ritual calendar text from Emar (Emar 446) to challenge the late dating of Lev 23. Babcock argues that Lev 23 preserves an early (2nd-millennium) West Semitic ritual tradition.Building on the recent work of Klingbeil and Sparks, this book presents a new comparative methodology for exploring potential textual relationships. Babcock investigates the attributes of sacred ritual through the lens of sacred time, sacred space and movement, sacred objects, ritual participants, and ritual sound. The author begins with a study of ancient Near Eastern festival texts from the 3rd millennium through the 1st millennium. This analysis focuses on festival cycles, common festival attributes, and the role of time and space in ritual. Babcock then moves on to an intertextual study of biblical festival texts before completing a thorough investigation of both Lev 23 and Emar 446. The result is a compelling argument that Lev 23 preserves an early West Semitic festival tradition and does not date to the exilic eraâ"refuting the scholarly consensus.This illuminating reading stands as a model for future research in the field of ritual and comparative textual studies. Bookseller Inventory # BABSACRED

Ask Seller a Question

Bibliographic Details

Title: Sacred Ritual: West Semitic Calendars A ...

Publisher: Eisenbrauns

Binding: Hardcover/Hardback

Book Condition:New

About this title

Synopsis:

Israelite festival calendar texts (Exod 23; 34; Lev 23; Num 28 29; Deut 16; and Ezek 45) share many features; however, there are also differences. Some of the most-often-cited differences are the following: festival dates, festival locations, date of the New Year, festival timing, and festival names. Scholars have explored these distinctions, and many have concluded that different sources (authors/redactors) wrote the various calendars at different times in Israelite history. Scholars use these dissimilarities to argue that Lev 23 was written in the exilic or postexilic era. Babcock offers a new translation and analysis of a second-millennium B.C. multimonth ritual calendar text from Emar (Emar 446) to challenge the late dating of Lev 23. Babcock argues that Lev 23 preserves an early (2nd-millennium) West Semitic ritual tradition.

Building on the recent work of Klingbeil and Sparks, this book presents a new comparative methodology for exploring potential textual relationships. Babcock investigates the attributes of sacred ritual through the lens of sacred time, sacred space and movement, sacred objects, ritual participants, and ritual sound. The author begins with a study of ancient Near Eastern festival texts from the 3rd millennium through the 1st millennium. This analysis focuses on festival cycles, common festival attributes, and the role of time and space in ritual. Babcock then moves on to an intertextual study of biblical festival texts before completing a thorough investigation of both Lev 23 and Emar 446. The result is a compelling argument that Lev 23 preserves an early West Semitic festival tradition and does not date to the exilic era refuting the scholarly consensus.

This illuminating reading stands as a model for future research in the field of ritual and comparative textual studies.

"About this title" may belong to another edition of this title.

Store Description

Specializing in the ancient Near East and biblical studies for more than 30 years. The Scholar's Source for all academic books, foreign and domestic, in the ancient Near East and biblical studies

Visit Seller's Storefront

Terms of Sale:

We guarantee the condition of every book as it's described on the Abebooks web sites. If you're
dissatisfied with your purchase (Incorrect Book/Not as Described/Damaged) or if the order hasn't arrived,
you're eligible for a refund within 30 days of the estimated delivery date. If you've changed your mind
about a book that you've ordered, please use the Ask bookseller a question link to contact us and we'll
respond within 2 business days.


Shipping Terms:

Shipping costs are based on books weighing 2.2 LB, or 1 KG. If your book order is heavy or oversized, we may contact you to let you know extra shipping is required.

List this Seller's Books

Payment Methods
accepted by seller

Visa Mastercard American Express