Stock Image

From Slavery to Poverty: The Racial Origins of Welfare in New York, 1840-1918

SenGupta, Gunja

0 ratings by Goodreads
ISBN 10: 081474107X / ISBN 13: 9780814741078
Published by NYU Press
Used Condition: Very Good Soft cover
From Your Satisfaction Guaranteed (Brattleboro, VT, U.S.A.)

AbeBooks Seller Since December 22, 2009

Quantity Available: 2

Buy Used
Price: US$ 19.70 Convert Currency
Shipping: US$ 3.99 Within U.S.A. Destination, Rates & Speeds
Add to basket

30 Day Return Policy

About this Item

081474107X Clearing Inventory! New Book w/ minor flaw, like bent or scratched cover. Total Satisfaction Guaranteed. Quick Handling. We work every day but Sunday. Standard delivery takes 4-14 business days. Please note: Shipping may take longer if you live in Hawaii or Alaska, Puerto Rico or Guam. Bookseller Inventory # NY9780814741078VG

Ask Seller a Question

Bibliographic Details

Title: From Slavery to Poverty: The Racial Origins ...

Publisher: NYU Press

Binding: PAPERBACK

Book Condition:Very Good

About this title

Synopsis:

The racially charged stereotype of "welfare queen"—an allegedly promiscuous waster who uses her children as meal tickets funded by tax-payers—is a familiar icon in modern America, but as Gunja SenGupta reveals in From Slavery to Poverty, her historical roots run deep. For, SenGupta argues, the language and institutions of poor relief and reform have historically served as forums for inventing and negotiating identity.

Mining a broad array of sources on nineteenth-century New York City’s interlocking network of private benevolence and municipal relief, SenGupta shows that these institutions promoted a racialized definition of poverty and citizenship. But they also offered a framework within which working poor New Yorkers—recently freed slaves and disfranchised free blacks, Afro-Caribbean sojourners and Irish immigrants, sex workers and unemployed laborers, and mothers and children—could challenge stereotypes and offer alternative visions of community. Thus, SenGupta argues, long before the advent of the twentieth-century welfare state, the discourse of welfare in its nineteenth-century incarnation created a space to talk about community, race, and nation; about what it meant to be “American,” who belonged, and who did not. Her work provides historical context for understanding why today the notion of "welfare"—with all its derogatory “un-American” connotations—is associated not with middle-class entitlements like Social Security and Medicare, but rather with programs targeted at the poor, which are wrongly assumed to benefit primarily urban African Americans.

About the Author:

Gunja SenGupta is professor of history at Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York. She is the author of For God and Mammon: Evangelicals and Entrepreneurs, Masters and Slaves in Territorial Kansas.

"About this title" may belong to another edition of this title.

Store Description

Visit Seller's Storefront

Terms of Sale:

YOUR SATISFACTION IS GUARANTEED! We deliver as promised and want you to be happy with your purchase. Note, that we are very responsive to customer inquiries and ship quickly, but the postal service isn't always so fast with media mail packages. If you MUST have your book[s] quickly, it's wise to use priority mail--especially if you're on the West Coast. If you have any concerns about your shipment, contact us: ysgsales@gmail.com; typically it's the post office who has delayed things.

Returns: If...

More Information
Shipping Terms:

We ship every weekday. Most orders go out within 24 hours. Shipping costs are based on books weighing 2.2 LB, or 1 KG. If your book order is heavy or over-sized, we may contact you to let you know extra shipping is required.
*Please note: We do not offer expedited international shipping!

List this Seller's Books

Payment Methods
accepted by seller

Visa Mastercard American Express