Stock Image

Verging on the Abyss: The Social Fiction of Kate Chopin and Edith Wharton (Contributions in Women's Studies)

Elizabeth Papke, Mary

1 ratings by Goodreads
ISBN 10: 0313268770 / ISBN 13: 9780313268779
Published by Praeger, 1990
Used Condition: Good
From Better World Books (Mishawaka, IN, U.S.A.)

AbeBooks Seller Since August 3, 2006

Quantity Available: 1

Buy Used
Price: US$ 8.97 Convert Currency
Shipping: US$ 0.00 Within U.S.A. Destination, Rates & Speeds
Add to basket

30 Day Return Policy

About this Item

Former Library book. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. Bookseller Inventory # GRP25496328

Ask Seller a Question

Bibliographic Details

Title: Verging on the Abyss: The Social Fiction of ...

Publisher: Praeger

Publication Date: 1990

Book Condition:Good

About this title

Synopsis:

While neither Kate Chopin nor Edith Wharton can be called feminist writers, each did produce female moral art, writings that focus relentlessly on the dialectics of social relations and the position of women therein. Mary Papke analyzes their disintegrative visions through detailed readings of virtually all of their novels and several of their shorter works. Unlike comparable writers of their time, theirs was a nonpolemical but nonetheless political art in which disruption of the rules of masculine/feminine discourse and the hegemonic world view are deeply but obviously embedded within character, plot, and theme.

Papke begins with a brief examination of the ideology of true womanhood, which, she argues, permeates Chopin's and Wharton's fiction and world views. The remainder of her work offers an ideological reading of their social fiction in which their characters search for states of liminality, where they might achieve, however momentarily, autonomy. Repeatedly, Papke argues, these states of liminality are literally encoded into images of characters positioned on the edge of an abyss that then becomes a repository of multiple meanings. The author presents Chopin's and Wharton's female discourse as radical art because it dares to defy that which is both alienating and destructive. Papke's provocative analysis will be of interest not only to Wharton and Chopin scholars, but also to those working in the fields of feminist and women's studies. It will also interest scholars and students of American studies, particularly those working on late nineteenth and early twentieth century literature.

Book Description:

While neither Kate Chopin nor Edith Wharton can be called feminist writers, each did produce female moral art--writings that focus relentlessly on the dialectics of social relations and the position of women therein. Papke analyzes their disintegrative vision through detailed readings of virtually all of their novels and several of their shorter works. She argues that theirs was a nonpolemical but nonetheless political art in which disruption of the rules of masculine/feminine discourse is deeply embedded in within character, plot, and theme.

"About this title" may belong to another edition of this title.

Store Description

Visit Seller's Storefront

Terms of Sale:

100% refunds guaranteed, no questions asked.


Shipping Terms:

We ship daily!

List this Seller's Books

Payment Methods
accepted by seller

Visa Mastercard American Express