A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean . Performed under the direction of Captains Cook, Clerke, and Gore, ... A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean . Performed under the direction of Captains Cook, Clerke, and Gore, ... A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean . Performed under the direction of Captains Cook, Clerke, and Gore, ... A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean . Performed under the direction of Captains Cook, Clerke, and Gore, ...

A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean . Performed under the direction of Captains Cook, Clerke, and Gore, in His Majesty's Ships the Resolution and Discovery; in the years 1776-1779 and 1780

COOK, Capt. James (1728-1779) and Captain James KING

Published by H. Hughes, for G. Nicol and T. Cadell, 1785
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We're sorry; this specific copy is no longer available. Here are our closest matches for A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean . Performed under the direction of Captains Cook, Clerke, and Gore, in His Majesty's Ships the Resolution and Discovery; in the years 1776-1779 and 1780 by COOK, Capt. James (1728-1779) and Captain James KING.

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(Text: 3 vols., quarto [11 1/4 x 9 inches]; Atlas vol. of plates: 1 vol., large folio [21 ½ x 16 ¾ inches]).Text: Engraved medallion portrait vignettes by James Hogg on titles, 1 folding letterpress table. Atlas vol.: 87 engraved plates, plans and maps (one double-page, one folding), the 24 plates normally found bound in the text vol. here bound in the atlas unfolded and untrimmed. Text: contemporary tree calf, red morocco spine labels (neat repairs to head and foot of spines). Atlas: contemporary half calf and marbled-paper boards, red morocco spine labels. (Some wear to head and tail of spine) A fine unsophisticated set of the third edition of the third voyage, with the plates in their most desirable form: all the plates usually found in the text volumes are here bound, unfolded and uncut, in the atlas volume. "The famous accounts of Captain Cook's three voyages form the basis for any collection of Pacific books. In three great voyages Cook did more to clarify the geographical knowledge of the southern hemisphere than all his predecessors had done together. He was really the first scientific navigator and his voyages made great contributions to many fields of knowledge" (Hill). "Cook's third voyage was organized to seek the Northwest Passage and to return [the islander] Omai to Tahiti. Officers of the crew included William Bligh, James Burney, James Colnett, and George Vancouver. John Webber was appointed artist to the expedition. After calling at Kerguelen Island, Tasmania, New Zealand, and the Cook, Tonga, and Society Islands, the expedition sailed north and discovered Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands, which Cook named the Sandwich Islands. Cook charted the American west coast from Northern California through the Bering Strait as far north as latitude 70 degrees 44 minutes before he was stopped by pack ice. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in an unhappy skirmish with the natives over a boat. Charles Clarke took command and after he died six months later, the ships returned to England under John Gore. Despite hostilities with the United States and France, the scientific nature of this expedition caused the various governments to exempt these vessels from capture. The voyage resulted in what Cook judged his most valuable discovery - the Hawaiian Islands" (Hill). The typography of the second and third editions of the text of the third voyage is generally considered superior to the first. For the second and subsequent editions, Hughes took over the printing from Strahan and re-set the text. Contemporary support for this view is reported by Forbes who quotes an inscription in a set presented by Mrs. Cook to her doctor, Dr. Elliotson, which notes "the letter press of the second edition being much superior to the first both in paper & letter press." The third edition of the text is notable for its inclusion for the first time of an 8-pp. defense of Captain Cook against criticism by the French. This addition is authored by William Wales (the astronomer/navigator of Cook's second voyage) and refers to criticism of Cook's second voyage by French astronomer Pierre Charles Le Monnier. In 1739, the French captain De Bouvet had discovered, to the south of the Cape of Good Hope, an island which he named Cape Circumcision. Captain Cook, on his second voyage, had been unable to find it, and was led to suspect that the French had mistaken some bank of ice for an island. Le Monnier stated, in a paper which was read at the Academis des Soionora, that Cook was jealous of the earlier French discovery and had purposefully sought for the island under a different meridian than that which had been assigned to it. Wales's reply to Le Monnier was added to the third edition of Cook's third voyage in which Le Monnier's criticism is firmly disproved. The island was later "discovered" by the Swan and the Otter in their 1808 voyage (at a different location than the French had recorded) and is now called Bouvet Island. Copies of. Bookseller Inventory #

Bibliographic Details

Title: A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean . Performed ...
Publisher: H. Hughes, for G. Nicol and T. Cadell
Publication Date: 1785
Binding: 4 volumes

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1.

COOK, Capt. James (1728-1779) and Captain James KING
Published by H. Hughs for G. Nicol and T. Cadell, London (1785)
Used Hardcover Quantity Available: 1
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Book Description H. Hughs for G. Nicol and T. Cadell, London, 1785. 4 volumes (Text: 3 vols., quarto [11 3/8 x 9 1/4 inches]; Atlas vol. of plates: 1 vol., large folio [22 x 16 inches]). Text: Engraved medallion vignette on each title, 1 folding letterpress table, 24 engraved maps, coastal profiles and charts (13 folding). Atlas vol.: 63 engraved plates, plans and maps (one double-page, one folding). Text: contemporary calf, expertly rebacked at an early date, incorporating the original labels; atlas: expertly bound to style in half speckled calf over contemporary marbled paper-covered boards, spine in eight compartments with raised bands, each band flanked by triple gilt fillets, red morocco lettering-piece in the second compartment, green morocco in the fourth, the others with simple repeat decoration in gilt A fine copy of the second and best edition of the official account of Cook's third and last voyage, including images of and text on the exploration of Hawaii and the west coast of America, Canada and Alaska. "The famous accounts of Captain Cook's three voyages form the basis for any collection of Pacific books. In three great voyages Cook did more to clarify the geographical knowledge of the southern hemisphere than all his predecessors had done together. He was really the first scientific navigator and his voyages made great contributions to many fields of knowledge" (Hill). The typography of the second edition text of the third voyage is generally considered superior to the first (Hughs took over the printing from Strahan and re-set all the text). Contemporary support for this view is reported by Forbes who quotes an inscription in a set presented by Mrs. Cook to her doctor, Dr. Elliotson, which notes ".the second edition being much superior to the first both in paper & letterpress." "Cook's third voyage was organized to seek the Northwest Passage and to return [the islander] Omai to Tahiti. Officers of the crew included William Bligh, James Burney, James Colnett, and George Vancouver. John Webber was appointed artist to the expedition. After calling at Kerguelen Island, Tasmania, New Zealand, and the Cook, Tonga, and Society Islands, the expedition sailed north and discovered Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands, which Cook named the Sandwich Islands. Cook charted the American west coast from Northern California through the Bering Strait as far north as latitude 70 degrees 44 minutes before he was stopped by pack ice. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in an unhappy skirmish with the natives over a boat. Charles Clarke took command and after he died six months later, the ships returned to England under John Gore. Despite hostilities with the United States and France, the scientific nature of this expedition caused the various governments to exempt these vessels from capture. The voyage resulted in what Cook judged his most valuable discovery - the Hawaiian Islands" (Hill pp.61-62). Cf. Beddie 1543; cf. Forbes Hawaiian National Bibliography 62; cf. Lada-Mocarski 37; cf. Printing and the Mind of Man 223; cf. Sabin 16250. Seller Inventory # 19946

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2.

COOK, Capt. James (1728-1779) and Captain James KING
Published by H. Hughs for G. Nicol, and T. Cadell, London (1785)
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Book Description H. Hughs for G. Nicol, and T. Cadell, London, 1785. [22 5/8 x 16 3/4 inches]). Text: final blank 4H4 in vol.I. 1 folding letterpress table, uncut. Atlas: 87 engraved plates, plans and maps (1 folding, 1 double-page, plate LXXXII a proof before the addition of the plate number which is added in ink in a contemporary manuscript hand), the larger plates uncut at outer and lower margins, the smaller plates completely uncut and unfolded. Text: contemporary blue/gray paper-covered boards rebacked to style in 18th-century diced russia, spines gilt in seven compartments, red morocco lettering-pieces in the second and dark green/blue morocco in the third compartments, repeat pattern in gilt in the other compartments, edges uncut; Atlas: bound to match using blue/gray paper-covered boards backed with 18th-century diced russia, spine gilt in eight compartments with raised bands, lettering-pieces and repeat decoration in gilt using the same tools as used on the text volumes, top edge gilt A very fine original set of the second and best edition of the text, with the plates in their most desirable form: all the plates usually found in the text volumes are here bound, unfolded in the atlas volume. "The famous accounts of Captain Cook's three voyages form the basis for any collection of Pacific books. In three great voyages Cook did more to clarify the geographical knowledge of the southern hemisphere than all his predecessors had done together. He was really the first scientific navigator and his voyages made great contributions to many fields of knowledge" (Hill). "Cook's third voyage was organized to seek the Northwest Passage and to return [the islander] Omai to Tahiti. Officers of the crew included William Bligh, James Burney, James Colnett, and George Vancouver. John Webber was appointed artist to the expedition. After calling at Kerguelen Island, Tasmania, New Zealand, and the Cook, Tonga, and Society Islands, the expedition sailed north and discovered Christmas Island and the Hawaiian Islands, which Cook named the Sandwich Islands. Cook charted the American west coast from Northern California through the Bering Strait as far north as latitude 70 degrees 44 minutes before he was stopped by pack ice. He returned to Hawaii for the winter and was killed in an unhappy skirmish with the natives over a boat. Charles Clarke took command and after he died six months later, the ships returned to England under John Gore. Despite hostilities with the United States and France, the scientific nature of this expedition caused the various governments to exempt these vessels from capture. The voyage resulted in what Cook judged his most valuable discovery - the Hawaiian Islands" (Hill). The typography of the second edition of the text of the third voyage is generally considered superior to the first. For the second and subsequent editions, Hughes took over the printing from Strahan and re-set the text. Contemporary support for this view is reported by Forbes who quotes an inscription in a set presented by Mrs. Cook to her doctor, Dr. Elliotson, which notes "the letter press of the second edition being much superior to the first both in paper & letter press." Of great rarity and significance are the presence of the plates usually found in the text volume, here unfolded and bound into the atlas. Such sets are more desirable, as the plates may be enjoyed more fully without the usual folds and losses from irregular trimming by the binder. Beddie 1552; Forbes Hawaiian National Bibliography 85; cf. Sabin 16250. 4 volumes (Text: 3 vols., quarto [12 7/16 x 9 3/4 inches]; Atlas. Seller Inventory # 14173

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