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Memories of Martin Luther King


Martin Luther King Jr. would have turned 88 yesterday, on January 15th, 2017, were he not publicly assassinated on April 4th, 1968. Today,  Martin Luther King Jr. Day is a federal holiday in the United States, observed annually on the third Monday in January, close to MLK’s birthday. Now 49 years after his murder, longer dead than he was alive, he is nevertheless still remembered and celebrated, and still grieved and mourned… perhaps now more than ever, as America bids farewell to its first-ever black president and prepares for something different.

We live in a time of rigorous documentation, both digital and analog that allows us to look back, and remember.  Let’s.

Placard, 14 x 19.75 inches. Memphis, 1968. Large black letters printed on white posterboard stating "HONOR KING: END RACISM!"
Poster designed for a march on April 8, 1968, 4 days after Martin Luther King's Jr.'s assassination. Printed by Allied Printing. Corners and top are trimmed, creasing throughout, staining and a pair of less than two inch tears on left side and another at top affecting the first "O" in "Honor". Despite the obvious condition issues this piece displays as a worn relic of one of the most turbulent moments in recent American history and a defining moment of the civil rights movement. Rare.An assassin took Dr. King's life on April 4, 1968, while he was in Memphis to support a strike of 1,300 black sanitation workers - the working poor of their day - to demand the right to have a union. In an atmosphere of extreme tension, Mrs. King and three of her children led some 20,000 marchers through the streets of Memphis on April 8, holding signs that read, "Honor King: End Racism," "Union Justice Now," and the placard from earlier in the week, that stated simply "I Am A Man." National Guardsmen lined the streets, perched on M-48 tanks, bayonets mounted, as helicopters circled overhead. She led another 150,000 in a funeral procession through the streets of Atlanta the next day.

Placard from Memphis, 1968. “HONOR KING: END RACISM!”

Poster designed for a march on April 8, 1968, 4 days after Martin Luther King’s Jr.’s assassination. Printed by Allied Printing. A worn relic of one of the most turbulent moments in recent American history and a defining moment of the civil rights movement. Rare. An assassin took Dr. King’s life on April 4, 1968, while he was in Memphis to support a strike of 1,300 black sanitation workers – the working poor of their day – to demand the right to have a union. In an atmosphere of extreme tension, Mrs. King and three of her children led some 20,000 marchers through the streets of Memphis on April 8, holding signs that read, “Honor King: End Racism,” “Union Justice Now,” and the placard from earlier in the week, that stated simply “I Am A Man.” National Guardsmen lined the streets, perched on M-48 tanks, bayonets mounted, as helicopters circled overhead. She led another 150,000 in a funeral procession through the streets of Atlanta the next day.

 

Signed first editions of Stride Woward Freedom, published in 1958, by Martin Luther King jr. Subtitled "The Montgomery Story," Stride Toward Freedom is Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s dramatic and inspiring account of Rosa Parks and the Montgomery bus strike that led to the first successful large-scale application of non-violent resistance to segregation in the United States. This was Dr. King's first book, published when he was only 29 years old, three years after he led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. The book documents significant events of the burgeoning Civil Rights movement and is illustrated with a dozen black and white photographs, including one of Dr. King wearing a prison booking number around his neck, and an iconic photograph of Rosa Parks being fingerprinted. Runs 230pp. Bound in blue cloth boards and black cloth spine with silver lettering. According to Martin Luther King, Stride Toward Freedom, his memoir of the Montgomery bus boycott, is ''the chronicle of 50,000 Negroes who took to heart the principles of nonviolence, who learned to fight for their rights with the weapon of love, and who in the process, acquired a new estimate of their own human worth''

Signed first editions of Stride Toward Freedom


Published in 1958, by Martin Luther King jr.
Subtitled “The Montgomery Story,” Stride Toward Freedom is Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s dramatic and inspiring account of Rosa Parks and the Montgomery bus strike that led to the first successful large-scale application of non-violent resistance to segregation in the United States. This was Dr. King’s first book, published when he was only 29 years old, three years after he led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. The book documents significant events of the burgeoning Civil Rights movement and is illustrated with a dozen black and white photographs, including one of Dr. King wearing a prison booking number around his neck, and an iconic photograph of Rosa Parks being fingerprinted. Runs 230pp. Bound in blue cloth boards and black cloth spine with silver lettering. According to Martin Luther King, Stride Toward Freedom, his memoir of the Montgomery bus boycott, is ”the chronicle of 50,000 Negroes who took to heart the principles of nonviolence, who learned to fight for their rights with the weapon of love, and who in the process, acquired a new estimate of their own human worth”

 

Martin Luther King Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement, First Edition, 1989 18 volumes, all First Editions. The most comprehensive resource on Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement imaginable, containing over 150 pieces in 18 volumes covering the length of King's career, and featuring oral histories, an unpublished speech, and several Ph.D. dissertations representing important scholarly contributions to the field and likely unpublished elsewhere. Each volume is exhaustively indexed and cross-referenced with other volumes in the set. Although individual volumes can be found, this the first time we have encountered a complete set. Essential.Series editor David J. Garrow is a Pulitzer Prize winning historian and author specializing in the Civil Rights Movement and the Supreme Court, a frequent contributor to the New York Times, The Nation, and The New Republic, and served as the senior advisor to the 1987 PBS documentary "Eyes on the Prize."

Martin Luther King Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement, First Edition, 1989 18 volumes, all First Editions. The most comprehensive resource on Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement imaginable, containing over 150 pieces in 18 volumes covering the length of King’s career, and featuring oral histories, an unpublished speech, and several Ph.D. dissertations representing important scholarly contributions to the field and likely unpublished elsewhere. Each volume is exhaustively indexed and cross-referenced with other volumes in the set.  Series editor David J. Garrow is a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and author specializing in the Civil Rights Movement and the Supreme Court, a frequent contributor to the New York Times, The Nation, and The New Republic, and served as the senior advisor to the 1987 PBS documentary “Eyes on the Prize.”

 

Civil Rights Autograph Album Red leather album with "Autographs" in gilt on front board and blank pages. Each of the pages has been careful and artistically folded (as issued?), when a page was used it was unfolded. Ownership signature of Kira Vivian, daughter of Civil Rights pioneer C.T. Vivian, Blackstone Ranger, Freedom Rider, and one of the chief lieutenants of Dr. King during the Civil Rights Struggle. Inscribed by Kira Vivian to herself on the front fly, in girlish fashion. Leaves are creased where they've been unfolded, else condition overall is fine. Most of the signatures are directly on the pages of the album, a few inscriptions are tipped or laid in.Interspersed with a few autographs of the young teenage Kira's school friends are the Inscriptions and Autographs of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, John Lewis, Jesse Jackson, Andrew Young, Fanny Lou Hamer, Charles Billups, and James Bevel (Director of Direct Action and Director of Nonviolent Education of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and the Director of the Selma Movement). A visceral artifact of the struggle for Civil Rights, compiled at a time when the outcome was by no means assured. It would be difficult to capture the immediacy of the Movement so completely in a single object.

Civil Rights Autograph Album


Red leather album with “Autographs” in gilt on front board and blank pages. Each of the pages has been careful and artistically folded (as issued?), when a page was used it was unfolded. Ownership signature of Kira Vivian, daughter of Civil Rights pioneer C.T. Vivian, Blackstone Ranger, Freedom Rider, and one of the chief lieutenants of Dr. King during the Civil Rights Struggle. Inscribed by Kira Vivian to herself on the front fly, in girlish fashion. Leaves are creased where they’ve been unfolded, else condition overall is fine. Most of the signatures are directly on the pages of the album, a few inscriptions are tipped or laid in.Interspersed with a few autographs of the young teenage Kira’s school friends are the Inscriptions and Autographs of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, John Lewis, Jesse Jackson, Andrew Young, Fanny Lou Hamer, Charles Billups, and James Bevel (Director of Direct Action and Director of Nonviolent Education of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and the Director of the Selma Movement). A visceral artifact of the struggle for Civil Rights, compiled at a time when the outcome was by no means assured. It would be difficult to capture the immediacy of the Movement so completely in a single object.

 

On Being a Good Neighbor" - Signed Autograph Quotation Autograph quotation signed from the American pastor, activist, and leader in the Civil Rights movement who received the Nobel Peace Price in 1964. 1 page, no date, 8 handwritten lines on paper from King's sermon "On Being a Good Neighbor,"originally delivered during the Montgomery Bus Boycott in 1956. Measuring approx. 21 x 14 cm, signed with his name in full "Martin Luther King Jr.". Originally sent to a journalist at the Swedish newspaper "Dagens Nyheter" in 1966, at the time King spoke in Stockholm. The lines here penned encapsulate some of the essence of King's extraordinary vision: "It is tragic indeed that we seldom see people in their true humaness. A spiritual myopia limits our vision to external accidents. We see men as Jews or Gentiles, Catholics or Protestants, Chinese or American, Negroes or whites. We fail to think of them as fellow human beings made from the same basic stuff as we, molded in the same divine image.".

On Being a Good Neighbor – Signed Autograph Quotation


Autograph quotation signed from the American pastor, activist, and leader in the Civil Rights movement who received the Nobel Peace Price in 1964. 1 page, no date, 8 handwritten lines on paper from King’s sermon “On Being a Good Neighbor,”originally delivered during the Montgomery Bus Boycott in 1956. Measuring approx. 21 x 14 cm, signed with his name in full “Martin Luther King Jr.”. Originally sent to a journalist at the Swedish newspaper “Dagens Nyheter” in 1966, at the time King spoke in Stockholm. The lines here penned encapsulate some of the essence of King’s extraordinary vision: “It is tragic indeed that we seldom see people in their true humaness. A spiritual myopia limits our vision to external accidents. We see men as Jews or Gentiles, Catholics or Protestants, Chinese or American, Negroes or whites. We fail to think of them as fellow human beings made from the same basic stuff as we, molded in the same divine image.”.

 

The Peaceful Warrior First edition, fourth printing, January 1966 large print edition, Flat Signed and inscribed by (KING, Martin Luther) & Xernona Clayton the wife of Ed Clayton in Century City April 2009 in person. Dr. Martin's signature comes with a letter of authentication and has been housed in a fine leather custom book case. Dust Jacket Condition: Near Fine /as New; minor rubbing and small chipped at the top of the spine. Ed Clayton was an associate of Dr. King at the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He worked on special writing assignments for Life and the Associated Press, The United Press and the Associated Negro Press. He also served as an editor with Jet, Ebony and the Negro Digest; Illustrated by David Hodges. Xernona Clayton wrote the final chapter, which appears for the first time in the second edition (this is first). A biography of Martin Luther King, written for young readers. Very scarce.

The Peaceful Warrior


First edition, fourth printing, January 1966 large print edition, Flat Signed and inscribed by (KING, Martin Luther) & Xernona Clayton the wife of Ed Clayton in Century City April 2009 in person. Dr. Martin’s signature comes with a letter of authentication and has been housed in a fine leather custom book case. Dust Jacket Condition: Near Fine /as New; minor rubbing and small chipped at the top of the spine. Ed Clayton was an associate of Dr. King at the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He worked on special writing assignments for Life and the Associated Press, The United Press and the Associated Negro Press. He also served as an editor with Jet, Ebony and the Negro Digest; Illustrated by David Hodges. Xernona Clayton wrote the final chapter, which appears for the first time in the second edition (this is first). A biography of Martin Luther King, written for young readers. Very scarce.

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