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  • Seller image for The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America. for sale by Arader Galleries - AraderNYC

    AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851) and Reverend John Bachman (1790-1874)

    Published by New York: J.J. Audubon, 1845-46-48., 1845

    Seller: Arader Galleries - AraderNYC, New York, NY, U.S.A.
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    Seller Rating: 5-star rating

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    US$ 560,000.00

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    3 volumes, imperial folio (27 1/4 x 21 1/4 in.; 69.2 x 54 cm). 3 lithographed title-pages and 3 letterpress contents leaves, 150 lithographed plates by J. T. Bowen after John James and James Woodhouse Audubon, backgrounds after Victor Gifford Audubon, handcolored and heightened with gum arabic; title-pages and contents leaves foxed and creased, with small stain in lower right corners, inner margin of vol. 3 title tearing away from text block, neat repairs to tears (most 1-2 in., one approximately 6 in.) on 7 plates, light marginal foxing or mottling to about 9 plates, 3 plates toned (one on verso rather than recto), pl. 65 (Little Harvest Mouse) creased the length of the plate, dark stain in lower right corner of pl. 89 (Say's Squirrel). Modern half burgundy morocco over grey cloth, spines in 6 compartments gilt, morocco presentation label on front cover of vol. 1; extremities a bit worn with some minor losses and tears, lower board of vol. 3 scratched. [Together with]: 3 text volumes, 8vo (11 x 7 1/4 in.; 27.9 x 18.4 cm). New York: J. J. Audubon, 1856 (in roman numerals)-V. G. Audubon, 1851 (in roman numerals). Title-page for vol. 3 supplied with a vol. 1 title-page with volume number altered in ink to read "III,"half-title in vol. 1 only, list of subscribers in vol. 1 continued into vol. 2; half-title slightly trimmed, lacks the 5 supplemental handcolored lithographed plates, many leaves roughly opened (some left unopened), dampstaining in vol. 1, quires 8-48 progressively more pronounced, vol. 2 title and pp. 1-3 guarded, tissue repair to top margin of p. 3, text block cracked but intact between pp. 6-7, vol. 3 title tipped in with first text leaf. Grey cloth by Knowlton dated 1962, smooth spines lettered gilt. FIRST EDITION OF THE ONE OF THE GREATEST COLORPLATE BOOKS PRODUCED ENTIRELY IN AMERICA IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. PRESENTATION COPY, INSCRIBED BY V. G. AUDUBON in the second text volume: "To Dr. A. V. Williams | with the best wishes of his | obliged friend | V. G. Audubon." After an unsuccessful attempt to secure federal funding for his "Great Western Journey," Audubon determined that the commercial potential of the Quadrupeds was sufficient to risk funding the expedition himself. "To render [the Quadrupeds] more complete, I will leave the comforts of my home and beloved family, bound to the Rocky Mountains I cannot tell how long I may be absent, but look to return loaded up knowledge, new and abundant specimens on the shot and not from stuffed museums' moth-eaten remains. I am told that I am too old to undertake such a long and arduous journey, but having the will, I will no doubt safely bear or even surmount the difficulties" (letter to C. Bonaparte, February, 1843, quoted by Rhodes). To his collaborator the Rev. James Bachman, he exclaimed "I am growing old, but what of this? My spirits are as enthusiastical as ever, my legs full able to carry my body for ten years to come, and in about two of these I expect the illustrations out, and ere the following twelve months have elapsed, their histories studied, their descriptions carefully prepared and the book printed!" (Streshinsky, Audubon: Life and Art in the American Wilderness, p. 332). It was to be J.J. Audubon's last major endeavor. Returning home in late fall of 1843 aged 58 and in declining health, he delegated many of the smaller mammals to his son John Woodhouse to draw and the backgrounds to his youngest, Victor Gifford, who also supervised the printing and publication. Despite Audubon's optimistic timeline for the completed work, it took the family five years to publish 150 plates in thirty parts. The first proofs were ready in 1842, but Audubon was Audubon's lithographer J.T. Bowen was immersed in the production of the octavo set of The Birds of America. The last part of the octavo Birds appeared in May, 1844, and publication of the folio Quadrupeds began immediately, with the first number being issued in January, 1845 and the first volume completed wi.

  • Seller image for The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America for sale by Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)

    AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851) and Rev. John BACHMAN (1790-1874)

    Published by J.J. Audubon (-V.G. Audubon), New York, 1849

    Seller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA), New York, NY, U.S.A.
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    Association Member: ABAA ILAB

    Seller Rating: 4-star rating

    US$ 580,000.00

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    (27 1/4 x 21 1/4 inches). Three lithographic titlepages, three leaves of letterpress contents. 150 handcolored lithographic plates after John James Audubon and John Woodhouse Audubon, the backgrounds after Victor Audubon, printed and colored by J.T. Bowen of Philadelphia. Expertly bound to style in half dark purple morocco over period purple cloth covered boards, spine with raised bands lettered in the second and third compartments, the others decorated in gilt, marbled edges and endpapers A beautiful set of the first elephant folio edition of Audubon's "Quadrupeds," complete with the separate text volumes. [With:] The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America. New York: J. J. Audubon, 1846-1851-1854. 3 volumes, small 4to (10 x 7 inches). Half-titles, list of subscribers. 6 hand coloured lithographed plates [i.e. plate 124 and plates 151-155]. Expertly bound to style uniform to the above in half purple morocco over period purple cloth covered boards, marbled endpapers. This is Audubon's final great natural history work. Unlike the double-elephant folio edition of the Birds of America, which was printed in London, the Quadrupeds was produced in the United States. It was the largest and most significant color plate book produced in America in the 19th century, and a fitting monument to Audubon's continuing genius. The work was originally published in thirty parts, each containing five plates, and priced at ten dollars per number. The first proofs were ready in 1842, but Audubon was fully employing the services of the lithographer J.T. Bowen on the octavo edition of The Birds of America, which was the greatest money-maker of any of the Audubon family ventures. Instead, Audubon and his sons busied themselves in gathering subscribers, signing up over 200 by the summer of 1844 (eventually the subscription list reached 300). The last part of the octavo Birds appeared in May, 1844, and publication of the folio Quadrupeds commenced immediately with the first number being issued in January, 1845 and the first volume completed within the year. Audubon's health began to fail dramatically, and responsibility for new art work fell mainly on his son John Woodhouse Audubon, with some help from his brother Victor. The second volume was completed in March, 1847. But, as John Woodhouse travelled first to Texas, then to London and Europe, the pace slowed further. The final number was issued early in 1849. By this time the elder Audubon had become completely senile ("his mind is all in ruins" Bachman wrote sadly in June, 1848). He died in early 1851. In the end, about half of the plates were based on the work of John James and half on the efforts of John Woodhouse. Audubon's collaborator on the text of the Quadrupeds was the naturalist and Lutheran clergyman, John Bachman, who was a recognized authority on the subject in the United States. The two began their association when Audubon stayed with Bachman and his family in Charleston for a month in 1831. This friendship was later cemented by the marriage of Audubon's sons, Victor and John to Bachman's daughters, Maria and Eliza. Audubon knew Bachman's contribution to the Quadrupeds would be crucial, especially because of his concerns over his own technical knowledge. By 1840, Bachman had become indispensable to the Quadrupeds project, and as Audubon showed increasing signs of vagueness, found himself writing most of the text, with some help from Victor (who was the primary business manager of the project). The text appeared between December, 1846 and the spring of 1854. Two issues of the third volume of the text are known, the present being the preferred second issue, with the supplementary text and the six octavo sized plates issued in 1854, being images not found in the folio atlas. The elephant folio edition of Audubon's Quadrupeds will always be compared to the incomparable Birds. It should be judged in its own right, as one of the grandest American works of natural history ever produced, and one of the greatest American illustrated works ever created. Bennett, p.5; Wood, p.208; Nissen 162; Reese, Stamped with a National Character 36; Sabin 2367; Ford, Audubon's Animals, New York, 1951; Boehme, Sarah, ed.: John James Audubon in the West, New York, 2000, especially Ron Tyler's essay, "The Publication of the Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America", pp. 119-182, and Robert Peck's essay "Audubon and Bachman, a Collaboration in Science", pp. 71-115. Three volumes, elephant folio broadsheets.

  • Seller image for The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America. for sale by Arader Galleries - AraderNYC

    AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851) and Reverend John Bachman (1790-1874)

    Published by New York: J.J. Audubon, 1845-46-48, 1845

    Seller: Arader Galleries - AraderNYC, New York, NY, U.S.A.
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    Seller Rating: 5-star rating

    First Edition

    US$ 650,000.00

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    3 volumes, imperial folio (27 1/4 x 21 in.; 69.2 x 53.3 cm). 3 lithographed title-pages and 3 letterpress contents leaves, 150 lithographed plates by J. T. Bowen after John James and James Woodhouse Audubon, backgrounds after Victor Gifford Audubon, handcolored and heightened with gum arabic; title-pages creased, short tear at bottom of vol. 1 title repaired, vol. 2 contents leaf creased, upper margin of pl. 51 (Canada Otter) creased, lower right corner of pl. 104 (Collies Squirrel) and left margin of pl. 148 (Tawny Weasel) chipped, minor spotting in top margin of pl. 111 (Musk Ox), pl. 129 (Northern Meadow Mouse) misnumbered 124. A FINE, FRESH AND BRILLIANTLY COLORED COPY. [Together with]: 3 text volumes, 8vo (11 x 7 1/2 in.; 28 x 19.1 cm). New York: J. J. Audubon, 1851; V.G. Audubon, 1851-54. 5 supplemental handcolored lithographed plates by J.T. Bowen in vol. 3, half-titles in vols. 1 and 3 only; lacks subscriber's list, quires 39-42 in vol. 2 misnumbered "VOL. III - 19; 40; 41; and 42." Uniformly bound in contemporary half brown morocco gilt: folios over brick red cloth with yellow-coated endpapers and text volumes over marbled boards with marbled endpapers; endpapers creased in folio volumes. FIRST EDITION OF THE ONE OF THE GREATEST COLORPLATE BOOKS PRODUCED ENTIRELY IN AMERICA IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. After an unsuccessful attempt to secure federal funding for his "Great Western Journey," Audubon determined that the commercial potential of the Quadrupeds was sufficient to risk funding the expedition himself. "To render [the Quadrupeds] more complete, I will leave the comforts of my home and beloved family, bound to the Rocky Mountains I cannot tell how long I may be absent, but look to return loaded up knowledge, new and abundant specimens on the shot and not from stuffed museums' moth-eaten remains. I am told that I am too old to undertake such a long and arduous journey, but having the will, I will no doubt safely bear or even surmount the difficulties" (letter to C. Bonaparte, February, 1843, quoted by Rhodes). To his collaborator the Rev. James Bachman, he exclaimed "I am growing old, but what of this? My spirits are as enthusiastical as ever, my legs full able to carry my body for ten years to come, and in about two of these I expect the illustrations out, and ere the following twelve months have elapsed, their histories studied, their descriptions carefully prepared and the book printed!" (Streshinsky, Audubon: Life and Art in the American Wilderness, p. 332). It was to be J.J. Audubon's last major endeavor. Returning home in late fall of 1843 aged 58 and in declining health, he delegated many of the smaller mammals to his son John Woodhouse to draw and the backgrounds to his youngest, Victor Gifford, who also supervised the printing and publication. Despite Audubon's optimistic timeline for the completed work, it took the family five years to publish 150 plates in thirty parts. The first proofs were ready in 1842, but Audubon was Audubon's lithographer J.T. Bowen was immersed in the production of the octavo set of The Birds of America. The last part of the octavo Birds appeared in May, 1844, and publication of the folio Quadrupeds began immediately, with the first number being issued in January, 1845 and the first volume completed within the year. The accompanying octavo text volumes, written and edited by Rev. John Bachman, first appeared between 1846 and 1854. "The massive project was a commercial success, thanks to the close management of Victor" (Reese), attracting a total number of 300 subscribers. REFERENCES: Bennett p. 5; McGill/Wood 208; Nissen ZBI 162; Reese 36; Sabin 2367 PROVENANCE: Folio Volumes: "W Coll 9119 [-9121]" (shelfmarks on endpapers) and "XBCA AU2" (shelfmarks at foot of spines). L64V5E.

  • Seller image for The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America. for sale by Arader Galleries - AraderNYC

    AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851) and Rev. John Bachman (1790-1874)

    Published by New York: J.J. Audubon (--V.G. Audubon), 1845-1848., 1848

    Seller: Arader Galleries - AraderNYC, New York, NY, U.S.A.
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    Seller Rating: 5-star rating

    First Edition

    US$ 725,000.00

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    4 volumes of elephant broadsheets bound as oblong folios (28 x 21 3/4 in.; 55.3 x 71.1 cm). 3 lithographed title-pages and 3 letterpress contents leaves, 150 lithographed plates by J. T. Bowen after John James and James Woodhouse Audubon, backgrounds after Victor Gifford Audubon, handcolored and heightened with gum arabic; titles and contents toned, moderate marginal dust-soiling on most plates, some finger soiling, plates 1, 62, 72, 73, 81 creased chiefly in upper lefthand corner, tape repairs to tiny tears along bottom margins of plates 112-113, small oil stains in gutters of about 13 plates, chiefly in the fourth volume. Contemporary quarter red morocco over brown marbled boards, spines gilt in six compartments lettered "Histoire Naturelle" in the second, numbered in the fourth, and monogrammed in the sixth; extremities rubbed; minor loss to head of spine (vol. 1), vol. 2 head of spine torn but present. FIRST EDITION OF THE ONE OF THE GREATEST COLORPLATE BOOKS PRODUCED ENTIRELY IN AMERICA IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. After an unsuccessful attempt to secure federal funding for his "Great Western Journey," Audubon determined that the commercial potential of the Quadrupeds was sufficient to risk funding the expedition himself. "To render [the Quadrupeds] more complete, I will leave the comforts of my home and beloved family, bound to the Rocky Mountains I cannot tell how long I may be absent, but look to return loaded up knowledge, new and abundant specimens on the shot and not from stuffed museums' moth-eaten remains. I am told that I am too old to undertake such a long and arduous journey, but having the will, I will no doubt safely bear or even surmount the difficulties" (letter to C. Bonaparte, February, 1843, quoted by Rhodes). To his collaborator the Rev. James Bachman, he exclaimed "I am growing old, but what of this? My spirits are as enthusiastical as ever, my legs full able to carry my body for ten years to come, and in about two of these I expect the illustrations out, and ere the following twelve months have elapsed, their histories studied, their descriptions carefully prepared and the book printed!" (Streshinsky, Audubon: Life and Art in the American Wilderness, p. 332). It was to be J.J. Audubon's last major endeavor. Returning home in late fall of 1843 aged 58 and in declining health, he delegated many of the smaller mammals to his son John Woodhouse to draw and the backgrounds to his youngest, Victor Gifford, who also supervised the printing and publication. Despite Audubon's optimistic timeline for the completed work, it took the family five years to publish 150 plates in thirty parts. The first proofs were ready in 1842, but Audubon was Audubon's lithographer J.T. Bowen was immersed in the production of the octavo set of The Birds of America. The last part of the octavo Birds appeared in May, 1844, and publication of the folio Quadrupeds began immediately, with the first number being issued in January, 1845 and the first volume completed within the year. The accompanying octavo text volumes, written and edited by Rev. John Bachman, first appeared between 1846 and 1854. "The massive project was a commercial success, thanks to the close management of Victor" (Reese), attracting a total number of 300 subscribers. REFERENCES: Bennett p. 5; McGill/Wood 208; Nissen ZBI 162; Reese 36; Sabin 2367 PROVENANCE: Gilt cypher in sixth spine compartment; J.R. Walsh (stamps on title-pages and contents leaves); Acquired from Nico Isreal, 1978; The Richard Harris Collection: Natural History and Colourplate Books (Bloomsbury, 13 October 2010, lot 3).L64V5D.