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About this Item: Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', London, 1779. Etching with aquatint, printed in sepia.Printed on laid paper with `J Bates' watermark and `JB' countermark. A fine series of profile views of the extraordinary Sable Island, from the remarkable marine atlas 'The Atlantic Neptune'. These views were intended as an aid to navigating the treacherous waters around the island. Sable Island is a 20 mile long crescent of sand, south east of Halifax, Nova Scotia. The island is the last offshore remnant of a time when the sea levels were much lower. It is theorized that the vast mound of sand that forms the island was deposited there by glaciers at the end of the last ice age. The shifting nature of the shoals off the island, allied with treacherous sea currents have meant that, until the invention of modern navigational techniques, it was extremely hazardous to ships. Over 350 wrecks have been recorded since 1583, the most recent in July 1999. Des Barres, of Swiss-Huguenot extraction, studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. During this period he also worked with the future legendary explorer James Cook on a monumental chart of the St. Lawrence River. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. He also managed to gain access to some surveys of the American South, Cuba and Jamaica. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on The Neptune. His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune, the most celebrated sea atlas, contained the first systematic survey of the east coast of North America. Des Barres's synergy of great empirical accuracy with the peerless artistic virtue of his aquatint views, created a work that "has been described as the most splendid collection of charts, plates and views ever published" (National Maritime Museum Catalogue). Upon the conclusion of the Seven Years War, Britain's empire in North America was greatly expanded, and this required the creation of a master atlas featuring new and accurate sea charts for use by the Royal Navy. Des Barres was charged with this Herculean task, publishing the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by three further volumes. Des Barres's monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and views, many being found in several states. Des Barres's charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information, and in many cases remained the most authoritative maps of the regions covered for several decades. Spendlove, The Face of Early Canada, Chapter 4: "J.F.W. Des Barres and The Atlantic Neptune"; pp. 18-22; National Maritime Museum (Greenwich) Henry Newton Stevens Collection 74e; Debard, "The Family Origins of Joseph Fredericks Wallet DesBarres: A Riddle Finally Solved", Nova Scotia Historical Review, Vol 14, No. 2 (1994), p.15. Seller Inventory # 13231

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DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

Published by J. F. W. Des Barres, [London (1781)

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About this Item: J. F. W. Des Barres, [London, 1781. Engraved with aquatint, on single double-page sheet watermarked "J. Bates." Excellent condition with minor repairs along centerfold. Detailed depiction of the mouth of the Miramachi River in New Brunswick and Miramachi Bay in the Gulf of St. Larwence. Des Barres, of Swiss-Huguenot extraction, studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. During this period he also worked with the future legendary explorer James Cook on a monumental chart of the St. Lawrence River. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. He also managed to gain access to some surveys of the American South, Cuba and Jamaica. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on The Neptune. His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune, the most celebrated sea atlas, contained the first systematic survey of the east coast of North America. Des Barres's synergy of great empirical accuracy with the peerless artistic virtue of his aquatint views, created a work that "has been described as the most splendid collection of charts, plates and views ever published" (National Maritime Museum Catalogue). Upon the conclusion of the Seven Years War, Britain's empire in North America was greatly expanded, and this required the creation of a master atlas featuring new and accurate sea charts for use by the Royal Navy. Des Barres was charged with this Herculean task, publishing the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by three further volumes. Des Barres's monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and views, many being found in several states. Des Barres's charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information, and in many cases remained the most authoritative maps of the regions covered for several decades. The survey of the St. Lawrence River and Gulf was conducted by Samuel Holland, who provided many charts to the immense hydrographic enterprise realized in the Atlantic Neptune . This is the fourth state of the map, with the imprint date changed to 1781. HNS 131D; Spendlove, The Face of Early Canada, Chapter 4: "J.F.W. Des Barres and The Atlantic Neptune"; pp. 18-22; Debard, "The Family Origins of Joseph Fredericks Wallet Des Barres: A Riddle Finally Solved", Nova Scotia Historical Review, Vol 14, No. 2 (1994), p.15. Seller Inventory # 34986

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DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

Published by Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', London (1779)

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About this Item: Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', London, 1779. Sea chart, etched with roulette-work, with original colour, with aquatint view. Printed on laid paper with `J Bates' watermark and `JB' countermark. A very fine sea chart and view of Egmont, now called Jeddore Harbour, from 'The Atlantic Neptune', the first British sea atlas of her North American colonies This is a finely presented and highly detailed chart of what is now known as Jeddore Harbour, near Halifax. The bay, seven miles long and three miles wide, is captured in a cartographic composition of great topographical and hydrographical detail, and is further embellished by a roundel containing a mariner's view of the area. This chart is the fifth and final state produced, and is identical to the Henry Stevens Collection , variant 49G, in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. Des Barres studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. On the outbreak of the Seven Years war in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to be his aide-de-camp. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St.Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on the Neptune . His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune was the first British sea atlas of her North American colonies, and one of the most important achievements of eighteenth century cartography. With an official commission from the Royal Navy, Des Barres published the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by further volumes. Des Barres' monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and aquatint views, many being found in several states. All of the charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information. Des Barres' plates were used to print further editions up into the first decade of the nineteenth-century. The Neptune met with the highest acclaim from the beginning, and is today widely regarded as superior to all other atlases produced during its time. National Maritime Museum: Henry Stevens Collection: K0124 HNS 49G & Catalogue , no.38, p.382; Cf. Spendlove, The Face of Early Canada , Chapter 4: "J.F.W. Des Barres and The Atlantic Neptune"; pp. 18-22; Debard, "The Family Origins of Joseph Frederick Wallet Des Barres: A Riddle Finally Solved", Nova Scotia Historical Review, Vol 14, No. 2 (1994), p.15. Seller Inventory # 5597

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DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

Published by J. F. W. Des Barres for 'The Atlantic Neptune', London (1781)

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About this Item: J. F. W. Des Barres for 'The Atlantic Neptune', London, 1781. Etched with aquatint and stippling. Some outline color. Platemark: 29 1/4 x 21 3/8"; sheet: 32 3/4 x 24 3/4". Laid paper watermarked "J. Bates" with counter mark "J.B." A meticulous survey of a portion of the eastern coast of New Brunswick on the Northumberland Straits with soundings and topographical detailing This chart, which appeared in Volume II of The Atlantic Neptune, was part of the surveying work conducted by Des Barres himself in the late 1760's and early 1770's. The first state was issued in 1776; this enhanced second state appeared in 1779. Des Barres, of Swiss-Huguenot extraction, studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. During this period he also worked with the future legendary explorer James Cook on a monumental chart of the St. Lawrence River. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. He also managed to gain access to some surveys of the American South, Cuba and Jamaica. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on The Neptune. His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune, the most celebrated sea atlas, contained the first systematic survey of the east coast of North America. Des Barres's synergy of great empirical accuracy with the peerless artistic virtue of his aquatint views, created a work that "has been described as the most splendid collection of charts, plates and views ever published" (National Maritime Museum Catalogue). Upon the conclusion of the Seven Years War, Britain's empire in North America was greatly expanded, and this required the creation of a master atlas featuring new and accurate sea charts for use by the Royal Navy. Des Barres was charged with this Herculean task, publishing the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by three further volumes. Des Barres's monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and views, many being found in several states. Des Barres's charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information, and in many cases remained the most authoritative maps of the regions covered for several decades. Stevens 72h. Seller Inventory # 20210

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DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

Published by British Admiralty for 'The Atlantic Neptune'], [London (1779)

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About this Item: British Admiralty for 'The Atlantic Neptune'], [London, 1779. Etching with roulette work, original outline color on laid paper watermarked "JBates" and countermarked "JB" This excellent example of Des Barres' craftsmanship details a portion of the strait between New Brunswick and what is now Prince Edward Island (then St. John's Island). It includes on the New Brunswick side: Shediac, Cocagne and Boutouche. The chart includes soundings throughout the Straits and Baie Verte. This is one of the many regions Des Barres himself surveyed during the 1760's Des Barres, of Swiss-Huguenot extraction, studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. During this period he also worked with the future legendary explorer James Cook on a monumental chart of the St. Lawrence River. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. He also managed to gain access to some surveys of the American South, Cuba and Jamaica. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on The Neptune. His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune, the most celebrated sea atlas, contained the first systematic survey of the east coast of North America. Des Barres's synergy of great empirical accuracy with the peerless artistic virtue of his aquatint views, created a work that "has been described as the most splendid collection of charts, plates and views ever published" (National Maritime Museum Catalogue). Upon the conclusion of the Seven Years War, Britain's empire in North America was greatly expanded, and this required the creation of a master atlas featuring new and accurate sea charts for use by the Royal Navy. Des Barres was charged with this Herculean task, publishing the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by three further volumes. Des Barres's monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and views, many being found in several states. Des Barres's charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information, and in many cases remained the most authoritative maps of the regions covered for several decades. Streeter copy: Vol. II, # 58; Stevens 68e. Seller Inventory # 28787

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About this Item: Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', London, 1781. Etching with aquatint. Sheet size: 33 x 24 1/4 inches. A portion of the upper left platemark expertly reinforced. 3rd state of 5 (Corresponding to Stevens 51 (c)). A set of six navigational views of Halifax Harbour and nearby coastal area, from one of the most important North American marine atlases This group includes four views intended as aids to navigation. The profiles were intended for use by captains of vessels to identify exactly where they were in relation to distant shorelines; added to these is a charming roundel giving a picturesque view of a waterfall on the Hinchinbroke River and finally a tranquil view in Halifax harbour which is enlivened by the small scene in the lower right of the image where, amid clouds of steam, men work frantically to re-tar the hull of a man-of-war. This later state of the print incorporates all the improvements in detail and the addition of sailing ships of all kinds. 'The Atlantic Neptune' was the first great marine atlas, and one of the greatest achievements of eighteenth century cartography. Published in England in 1774, it contained over 250 charts and views of the North American and Canadian coasts. The charts were intensely detailed and contained both hydrographical and topographical details. The Neptune was compiled and published for the Royal Navy by Joseph F. W. Des Barres, a Swiss cartographer who joined the Royal American Regiment as a surveyor. Des Barres fought in the French and Indian wars and was enlisted to survey the Canadian coastline. While his fellow surveyor, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast, Des Barres mapped the shoreline of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and the St. Lawrence River regions. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he compiled and published his monumental atlas; his dedication to the project was so strong that he published an updated version of the work every year until 1784. Des Barres' work was so superior to any other contemporary atlas, that the maps were used as the standard charts of the East coast for over 50 years. The Neptune remains one of the most important atlases ever printed, its views and maps chart the history of North America and allow us to glimpse forgotten shores long changed with the passage of time. Spendlove, The Face of Early Canada , Chapter 4: "J.F.W. Des Barres and The Atlantic Neptune"; pp. 18-22; Debard, "The Family Origins of Joseph Fredericks Wallet DesBarres: A Riddle Finally Solved", Nova Scotia Historical Review, Vol 14, No. 2 (1994), p.15; Catalogue of the Henry Newton Stevens Collection.51c. Seller Inventory # 34269

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DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

Published by Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', London (1781)

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About this Item: Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', London, 1781. Etching with added hand-colour. On laid paper with `J Bates' watermark and `JB' countermark. A fine print from 'The Atlantic Neptune' which charts the Annapolis Royal, with a coastal view of Gulliver's Hole and a descriptive text. 'The Atlantic Neptune' was the first great marine atlas, and one of the greatest achievements of eighteenth century cartography. Published in England in 1774, it contained over 250 charts and views of the North American and Canadian coasts. The charts were intensely detailed and contained both hydrographical and topographical details. The Neptune was compiled and published for the Royal Navy by Joseph F. W. Des Barres, a Swiss cartographer who joined the Royal American Regiment as a surveyor. Des Barres fought in the French and Indian wars and was enlisted to survey the Canadian coastline. While his fellow surveyor, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast, Des Barres mapped the shoreline of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and the St. Lawrence River regions. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he compiled and published his monumental atlas; his dedication to the project was so strong that he published an updated version of the work every year until 1784. Des Barres' work was so superior to any other contemporary atlas, that the maps were used as the standard charts of the East coast for over 50 years. The Neptune remains one of the most important atlases ever printed, its views and maps chart the history of North America and allow us to glimpse a forgotten land long changed by the passage of time. This chart is an excellent eighteenth century record of the first settlement in Canada. In 1605, two years before the first permanent English settlement at Jamestown, three years before the founding of Quebec, and fifteen years before the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth, a small party of French explorers, led by Sieur de Monts, established Port Royal as the first settlement in Canada. The settlement was later renamed Annapolis Royal which is the name asigned to it in Des Barres chart. Spendlove, The Face of Early Canada, Chapter 4: "J.F.W. Des Barres and The Atlantic Neptune"; pp. 18-22; Debard, "The Family Origins of Joseph Fredericks Wallet DesBarres: A Riddle Finally Solved", Nova Scotia Historical Review, Vol 14, No. 2 (1994), p.15. Seller Inventory # 5598

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A View of the Plaister Cliffs, on: DES BARRES, J.F.W.

DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

Published by Published by J.F.W Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', London (1781)

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About this Item: Published by J.F.W Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', London, 1781. Etching with aquatint, printed in sepia. Printed on laid paper with watermark `J Bates' and countermark `JB'. A large-scale view of the scenery near Lakevale and Antigonish on the North West coast of Nova Scotia, from 'The Atlantic Neptune', the first British sea atlas of her North American colonies This is a very fine scene depicting a dramatic point where the highlands of Nova Scotia cascade into the Gulf of St. Lawrence. This is the second state of this view, and is identical to the Henry Stevens Collection , variant 70B, in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. Des Barres studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. On the outbreak of the Seven Years war in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to be his aide-de-camp. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St.Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on the Neptune. His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune was the first British sea atlas of her North American colonies, and one of the most important achievements of eighteenth century cartography. With an official commission from the Royal Navy, Des Barres published the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by further volumes. Des Barres' monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and aquatint views, many being found in several states. All of the charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information. Des Barres' plates were used to print further editions up into the first decade of the nineteenth-century. The Neptune met with the highest acclaim from the beginning, and is today widely regarded as superior to all other atlases produced during its time. Spendlove, The Face of Early Canada , Chapter 4: "J.F.W. Des Barres and The Atlantic Neptune"; pp. 18-22; Debard, "The Family Origins of Joseph Fredericks Wallet DesBarres: A Riddle Finally Solved", Nova Scotia Historical Review, Vol 14, No. 2 (1994), p.15; National Maritime Museum: Henry Stevens Collection: K0231 HNS 70B. Seller Inventory # 3608

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About this Item: Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', [London, 1777. Hand-colored etching on Bates paper. No imprint. Sheet size: 32 1/4 x 23 3/4 inches with center fold, as with all early issues. Expert restoration to center fold and marginal tears. A set of six navigational views of Halifax Harbour and nearby coastal area, from one of the most important North American marine atlases This group includes four profile views intended as aids to navigation. The profiles were intended for use by captains of vessels to identify exactly where they were in relation to distant shorelines; added to these is a charming roundel giving a picturesque view of a waterfall on the Hinchinbroke River and finally a tranquil view in Halifax harbour which is enlivened by the small scene in the lower right of the image where, amid clouds of steam, men work frantically to re-tar the hull of a man-of-war. This finely coloured example of the print corresponds to Stevens 51, first state without stamped plate number. 'The Atlantic Neptune ' was the first great marine atlas, and one of the greatest achievements of eighteenth century cartography. Published in England in 1774, it contained over 250 charts and views of the North American and Canadian coasts. The charts were intensely detailed and contained both hydrographical and topographical details. The Neptune was compiled and published for the Royal Navy by Joseph F. W. Des Barres, a Swiss cartographer who joined the Royal American Regiment as a surveyor. Des Barres fought in the French and Indian wars and was enlisted to survey the Canadian coastline. While his fellow surveyor, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast, Des Barres mapped the shoreline of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and the St. Lawrence River regions. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he compiled and published his monumental atlas; his dedication to the project was so strong that he published an updated version of the work every year until 1784. Des Barres' work was so superior to any other contemporary atlas, that the maps were used as the standard charts of the East coast for over 50 years. The Neptune remains one of the most important atlases ever printed, its views and maps chart the history of North America and allow us to glimpse forgotten shores long changed with the passage of time. Spendlove, The Face of Early Canada , Chapter 4: "J.F.W. Des Barres and The Atlantic Neptune"; pp. 18-22; Debard, "The Family Origins of Joseph Fredericks Wallet DesBarres: A Riddle Finally Solved", Nova Scotia Historical Review, Vol 14, No. 2 (1994), p.15; Stevens 51A. Seller Inventory # 34270

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DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

Published by London (1781)

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About this Item: London, 1781. Engraved chart, the town and border hand-coloured as issued. Minor repaired edge tears. Sheet Size: 22 5/8 x 32 1/2 inches. An important 18th century chart of Louisbourg harbour. Des Barres, of Swiss-Huguenot extraction, studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. During this period he also worked with the future legendary explorer James Cook on a monumental chart of the St. Lawrence River. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. He also managed to gain access to some surveys of the American South, Cuba and Jamaica. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on The Neptune. His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune, the most celebrated sea atlas, contained the first systematic survey of the east coast of North America. Des Barres's synergy of great empirical accuracy with the peerless artistic virtue of his aquatint views, created a work that "has been described as the most splendid collection of charts, plates and views ever published" (National Maritime Museum Catalogue). Upon the conclusion of the Seven Years War, Britain's empire in North America was greatly expanded, and this required the creation of a master atlas featuring new and accurate sea charts for use by the Royal Navy. Des Barres was charged with this Herculean task, publishing the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by three further volumes. Des Barres's monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and views, many being found in several states. Des Barres's charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information, and in many cases remained the most authoritative maps of the regions covered for several decades. Stevens 140. Seller Inventory # 19326

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DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

Published by Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', [London (1781)

Art / Print / Poster

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About this Item: Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', [London, 1781. Etching with aquatint. Printed on laid paper with `J. Bates' watermark and `JB' countermark. Skillful marginal restoration in several places. One of the most desirable, large-scale views from the 'The Atlantic Neptune', the first British sea atlas of her North American colonies In this fine scene Des Barres depicts his own men camping beneath the hills that form the spine of Sable Island, the 20 mile-long shifting sandbar that lies 111 miles off the coast of Halifax. From 1766 to 1768, Des Barres and his party spent two seasons surveying the waters around Sable Island. The island is known for both for its wild horses, depicted here, and, more ominously. as the "Graveyard of the Atlantic." The island is the last offshore remnant from the time when the sea levels were much lower. It is theorized that the vast mound of sand that forms the island was deposited there by glaciers at the end of the last ice age. The shifting nature of the shoals off the island, allied with treacherous sea currents have meant that, until the invention of modern navigational techniques, it was extremely hazardous to ships. Over 350 wrecks have been recorded since 1583, the most recent in July 1999. The horses on the island, now numbering about 200, are probably descended from stock belonging to the Acadians of Nova Scotia. In 1760, the Boston merchant Thomas Hancock shipped 60 Acadian horses to Sable island, where they have bred and flourished ever since. The isolated nature of the herd means that they provide insights into the type of animal that was favoured by the eighteenth-century settlers. This view is the fourth and final state produced, and is identical to the Henry Stevens Collection , variant 77D, in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. Des Barres studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. On the outbreak of the Seven Years war in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to be his aide-de-camp. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St.Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on the Neptune. His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune was the first British sea atlas of her North American colonies, and one of the most important achievements of eighteenth century cartography. With an official commission from the Royal Navy, Des Barres published the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by further volumes. Des Barres' monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and aquatint views, many being found in several states. All of the charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information. Des Barres' plates were used to print further editions up into the first decade of the nineteenth-century. The Neptune met with the highest acclaim from the beginning, and is today widely regarded as superior to all other atlases produced during its time. Spendlove, The Face of Early Canada, Chapter 4: "J.F.W. Des Barres and The Atlantic Neptune"; pp. 18-22; Debard, "The Family Origins of Joseph Fredericks Wallet DesBarres: A Riddle Finally Solved", Nova Scotia Historical Review, Vol 14, No. 2 (1994), p.15; National Maritime Museum: Henry Stevens Collection: K0252 HNS 77D & Catalogue, no.62-66, p.383; Phillips, p.634. Seller Inventory # 33877

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The Entrance of Louisbourg Harbour, on the: DES BARRES, J.F.W.

DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

Published by Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', London (1779)

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About this Item: Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', London, 1779. Etching with aquatint, printed in sepia. Printed on laid paper with `J Bates' watermark and `JB' countermark. A large-scale view of the entrance to the harbour at Louisbourg, from 'The Atlantic Neptune', the first British sea atlas of her North American colonies A fine view of the harbour of Louisbourg, the former "impregnable" fortress that was the gateway to French America, and the scene of two great battles between France and Britain, in 1748 and 1758. The scene depicted here features ships sailing into the excellent natural harbour, surrounded by a ruggedly beautiful landscape. This is the third state of this view, and is identical to the Henry Stevens Collection, variant 65C, in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. Des Barres studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. On the outbreak of the Seven Years war in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to be his aide-de-camp. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St.Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on the Neptune. His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune was the first British sea atlas of her North American colonies, and one of the most important achievements of eighteenth century cartography. With an official commission from the Royal Navy, Des Barres published the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by further volumes. Des Barres' monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and aquatint views, many being found in several states. All of the charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information. Des Barres' plates were used to print further editions up into the first decade of the nineteenth-century. The Neptune met with the highest acclaim from the beginning, and is today widely regarded as superior to all other atlases produced during its time. Spendlove, The Face of Early Canada, Chapter 4: "J.F.W. Des Barres and The Atlantic Neptune"; pp. 18-22; Debard, "The Family Origins of Joseph Fredericks Wallet Des Barres: A Riddle Finally Solved", Nova Scotia Historical Review, Vol 14, No. 2 (1994), p.15; National Maritime Museum: Henry Stevens Collection: K0206 HNS 65C. Seller Inventory # 3603

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DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

Published by Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', London (1779)

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About this Item: Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', London, 1779. Etching with aquatint, printed in sepia, coloured by hand. Printed on laid paper with `J Bates' watermark and `JB' countermark. Small tears to fold, repaired tear to plate mark. A large-scale view of the entrance to the harbour at Louisbourg, from one of the most important North American marine atlases. This very fine view is taken from the sea, with the harbour mouth in the foreground and, in the background, the spires and roofs of the town and fort of Louisbourg, the port of entry to Cape Breton county, Nova Scotia. As usual, Des Barres has added rowing boats and ships to give the viewer the correct sense of scale. Des Barres, of Swiss-Huguenot extraction, studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. During this period he also worked with the future legendary explorer James Cook on a monumental chart of the St. Lawrence River. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. He also managed to gain access to some surveys of the American South, Cuba and Jamaica. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on The Neptune. His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune , the most celebrated sea atlas, contained the first systematic survey of the east coast of North America. Des Barres's synergy of great empirical accuracy with the peerless artistic virtue of his aquatint views, created a work that "has been described as the most splendid collection of charts, plates and views ever published" (National Maritime Museum Catalogue). Upon the conclusion of the Seven Years War, Britain's empire in North America was greatly expanded, and this required the creation of a master atlas featuring new and accurate sea charts for use by the Royal Navy. Des Barres was charged with this Herculean task, publishing the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by three further volumes. Des Barres's monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and views, many being found in several states. Des Barres's charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information, and in many cases remained the most authoritative maps of the regions covered for several decades. Spendlove, The Face of Early Canada, Chapter 4: "J.F.W. Des Barres and The Atlantic Neptune"; pp. 18-22; National Maritime Museum (Greenwich), Henry Newton Stevens Collection: 65C; Debard, "The Family Origins of Joseph Fredericks Wallet DesBarres: A Riddle Finally Solved", Nova Scotia Historical Review, Vol 14, No. 2 (1994), p.15. Seller Inventory # 13202

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About this Item: J.F.W. Des Barres, London, 1781. Hand-colored line engraving and aquatint. Two plates printed on two sheets, joined with 8 views arranged in 5 rows. Sheet size: 32 x 43 3/4 inches. 8 navigational profile views from the greatest of all 18th century sea atlases These eight views of sites in and around Nova Scotia were designed to give navigators additional information to the soundings on the charts of these same places. Several of the placenames have changed, but Beaver Island, Port Bickerton, Chedabucto Bay and Canso remain. This is the 5th of 5 states with many ships and aquatinted features to the landscapes added to the original plates. Des Barres, of Swiss-Huguenot extraction, studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. During this period he also worked with the future legendary explorer James Cook on a monumental chart of the St. Lawrence River. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. He also managed to gain access to some surveys of the American South, Cuba and Jamaica. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on The Neptune. His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The American Revolution in drawings and prints; a checklist of 1765-1790 graphics in the Library of Congress / Compiled by Donald H. Cresswell, with a foreword by Sinclair H. Hitchings. Washington : 1975, no. 397-404; #61e Henry Stevens Collection. Seller Inventory # 34403

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DES BARRES, J. F. W. (1721-1824), publisher - Samuel HOLLAND (1728-1801)

Published by J.F.W. Des Barres, London (1777)

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About this Item: J.F.W. Des Barres, London, 1777. Hand-colored etching. Several skilfully repaired tears. Trimmed within platemark left margin. Rare early view of Portsmouth from the New England volume of the Atlantic Neptune This is a view of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, when it was a thriving harbor town. This early etched view was replaced in later editions with a similar but altered and smaller aquatint view from which the seated artist and the grazing cows were removed. Des Barres, of Swiss-Huguenot extraction, studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. During this period he also worked with the future legendary explorer James Cook on a monumental chart of the St. Lawrence River. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast. He also managed to gain access to some surveys of the American South, Cuba and Jamaica. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on The Neptune . His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune , the most celebrated sea atlas, contained the first systematic survey of the east coast of North America. Des Barres's synergy of great empirical accuracy with the peerless artistic virtue of his aquatint views, created a work that "has been described as the most splendid collection of charts, plates and views ever published" (National Maritime Museum Catalogue). Upon the conclusion of the Seven Years War, Britain's empire in North America was greatly expanded, and this required the creation of a master atlas featuring new and accurate sea charts for use by the Royal Navy. Des Barres was charged with this Herculean task, publishing the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by three further volumes. Des Barres's monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and views, many being found in several states. Des Barres's charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information, and in many cases remained the most authoritative maps of the regions covered for several decades. Hornsby, Surveyors of Empire: Samuel Holland, J. F. W. Des Barres and the Making of the "Atlantic Neptune". Seller Inventory # 32296

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DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721?-1824)

Published by Published by J. F. W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', London (1779)

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About this Item: Published by J. F. W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', London, 1779. Black and white copper engraving. Large repaired tear (12") from bottom edge, parallel to centerfold. 4" repaired split from bottom in centerfold. Thin, uneven margins. Plate size: 30 1/4 x 22 1/8 inches. This is a fantastic sea chart of the Delaware coast from the 'The Atlantic Neptune' which is universally recognized as one of the most magnificent atlases ever made. This superb sea chart, constructed for the use of the British Navy, shows the major part of the Delaware coast, from Rehobeth to Bombay Hook, as well as the opposing south New Jersey shore. 'The Atlantic Neptune' was the first great marine atlas, and one of the great achievements of eighteenth century cartography. When publication in England began in 1774, it contained over 250 charts and views of the North American and Canadian coasts. The charts were intensely detailed and contained both hydrographical and topographical details. The Neptune was compiled and published for the Royal Navy by Joseph F. W. Des Barres, a Swiss cartographer who joined the Royal American Regiment as a surveyor. Des Barres fought in the French and Indian wars and was enlisted to survey the Canadian coastline. While his fellow surveyor, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast, Des Barres mapped the shoreline of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and the St. Lawrence River regions. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he compiled and published his monumental atlas; his dedication to the project was so strong that he published an updated version of the work every year until 1784. Des Barres' work was so superior to any other contemporary atlas that the maps were used as the standard charts of the East coast for over 50 years. The Neptune remains one of the most important atlases ever printed, its views and maps chart as aspect of the history of North America and now allow us to glimpse this land drastically changed by the passage of time. Snyder, City of Independence , p. 271; Stevens 158. Seller Inventory # 20759

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DES BARRES, J. F. W. (1721-1824, publisher) - Samuel HOLLAND (1728-1801) and George CALLENDAR (fl. around 1769), surveyors

Published by Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', London (1775)

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About this Item: Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in 'The Atlantic Neptune', London, 1775. Copper-engraved and etched map, with aquatint, on two joined sheets. Printed on laid paper with `J Bates' watermark and `JB' countermark, in excellent condition. Sheet size: 30 1/4 x 42 5/8 inches. [With:] The explanatory text leaf, titled as above. 1p., folio (25 1/2 x 19 inches). The finest and most celebrated sea chart of Boston Harbor ever produced, and a highly important Revolutionary War map depicting details relating to the Siege of Boston: with the very rare explanatory text leaf. This is one the most important maps contained in Des Barres' The Atlantic Neptune , and one of the most significant large-scale maps of the Revolutionary War. It provides an invaluable record of Boston at the beginning of the war, covering the area from the environs of the city out into the open waters of Massachusetts Bay. A particularly striking feature is the use of boldly etched and subtly aquatinted details to capture the diverse topography of the region, including the numerous hills, islands, and river estuaries. It is important to remember that this was issued as a working sea-chart, and as such the cartographer has naturally concentrated on features such as depth soundings, indicated by detailed lines and based on surveys by Samuel Holland and George Callendar, and the navigable channels between the harbor's numerous shoals, which are delicately outlined in stipple-engraving. Holland's original manuscript map is today preserved in the British Hydrographic Library at Taunton, Somerset. The present map shows the city of Boston, with its streets carefully outlined, occupying a pear-shaped peninsula, a position that would soon prove precarious to its British defenders in the escalating conflict. This is the second state (of five) of Des Barres' chart, and is identical to the Henry Stevens Collection , variant 96D, in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. This state shows a number of notable changes when compared with the original, and was evidently altered to take particular account of the Siege of Boston (April 19, 1775 to March 17, 1776). Henry Stevens noted that this state depicted the addition of "Numerous Forts, Batteries, Redoubts, &c. [which] have been inserted in many places, notably on the Charles Town peninsula, and on the mainland between 'Willis Creek' and 'Mystic River,' also on the east and north side of 'Charles River' below 'Cambridge'.[also] to the south of 'Boston Neck' and 'Dorchester Neck'.[This state] is almost as rare as the first state. It is found in some copies of the earliest edition of the Neptune." The accuracy, scope and artistic virtue of Des Barres's Chart of the Harbour of Boston was apparent to his contemporaries and it became the main source map of the area for decades to come. Joseph Frederick Wallet Des Barres was born in Switzerland, where his Huguenot ancestors had fled following the repeal of the Edict of Nantes. He studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before immigrating to Britain where he trained at the Royal Military College, Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. During this period he also worked with the legendary future explorer James Cook on a monumental chart of the St. Lawrence River. Upon the conclusion of the Seven Years War, Britain's empire in North America was greatly expanded, and this required the creation of a master atlas featuring new and accurate sea charts for use by the Royal Navy. Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence. With these extremely accurate surveys in hand, Des Barres returned to London in 1774, where the Royal Navy charged him with the Herculean task of producing the atlas. He was gradually forwarded the manuscripts of numerous advanced surveys conducted by British cartographers in the American Colonies, Jamaica and Cuba, of which the present map is based on the work of Samuel Holland, conducted in the 1760s. The result was The Atlantic Neptune , which became the most celebrated sea atlas of its era, containing the first systematic survey of the east coast of North America. Des Barres's synergy of great empirical accuracy with the peerless artistic virtue of his aquatint views, created a work that "has been described as the most splendid collection of charts, plates and views ever published" ( National Maritime Museum Catalogue ). The Neptune eventually consisted of four volumes and Des Barres's dedication to the project was so strong that often at his own expense he continually updated and added new charts and views to various editions up until 1784, producing over 250 charts and views, many appearing in several variations. All of these charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information, such that in many cases they remained the most authoritative maps of the regions covered for several decades. Following the completion of The Neptune , Des Barres returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, living to the advanced age of 103. Cf. Guthorn, British Maps of the American Revolution, (referring to Holland's original manuscript) 59/3; Krieger & Cobb p.107 (1781 issue); Lingel, Atlantic Neptune N91.2; National Maritime Museum, Henry Stevens Collection K0713 HNS 96D; National Maritime Museum, Catalogue , 78-83; Nebenzahl Bibliography 3; Stevens, Bibliography of the Atlantic Neptune (unpublished) pp.211-216; Sellers & Van Ee, 945. Seller Inventory # 17671

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DES BARRES, J. F. W. (1721-1824); after William PIERIE

Published by J. F. W. Des Barres, London (1776)

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About this Item: J. F. W. Des Barres, London, 1776. Engraved view, printed on laid paper, engraved by James Newton after Pierie. Sheet size: 22 1/2 x 31 1/2 inches. First state. Repaired tears in lower margin. Rare view of Boston from Dorchester Heights, published shortly after George Washington's first victory of the American Revolution. Following the Battles of Lexington and Concord, American troops laid siege to Boston. Strategically, Dorchester Heights offered commanding views of both Boston town and harbour. On March 4, 1776, under the cover of darkness and with batteries firing from Roxbury and Cambridge to provide a diversion, George Washington moved canon captured at Ticonderoga onto the Heights and fortified the position. Faced with little choice given the overwhelming strategic advantage, General Howe retreated from Boston on March 17, giving George Washington and the Americans a decisive early victory in the war. The present view, accomplished by British artillery officer William Pierie in 1773, depicts Boston, Boston Harbor and Roxbury, as it would have been seen by Washington and the American army. The Shirley-Eustis house, the home of Governor William Shirley and later Governor William Eustis, in Roxbury is visible in the middle ground, and in the far distance the beacon is visible atop Beacon Hill. A rare view, published in 1776 in the New England section of Des Barres monumental Atlantic Neptune. Joseph Frederick Wallet Des Barres was born in Switzerland, where his Huguenot ancestors had fled following the repeal of the Edict of Nantes. He studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before immigrating to Britain where he trained at the Royal Military College, Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. Des Barres returned to London in 1774, where the Royal Navy charged him with the Herculean task of producing an atlas of sea charts of the American coast. The result was The Atlantic Neptune, which became the most celebrated sea atlas of its era, containing the first systematic survey of the east coast of North America. Des Barres's synergy of great empirical accuracy with the peerless artistic virtue of his aquatint views, created a work that "has been described as the most splendid collection of charts, plates and views ever published" (National Maritime Museum Catalogue). The Neptune eventually consisted of four volumes and Des Barres's dedication to the project was so strong that often at his own expense he continually updated and added new charts and views to various editions up until 1784, producing over 250 charts and views, many appearing in several variations. Following the completion of The Neptune, Des Barres returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, living to the advanced age of 103. Henry Stevens Collection, HNS97; Deak 132. Seller Inventory # 34921

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DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in the 'Atlantic Neptune', London (1780)

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About this Item: J.F.W. Des Barres in the 'Atlantic Neptune', London, 1780. Engraved with aquatint, period (oxidized) color. Good condition apart from expert restoration to center fold, upper and lower margins. A very rare and highly important sea chart of Pensacola Harbor from the 'Atlantic Neptune', the finest marine atlas of North America's east coast, produced during the Revolutionary War. This superbly drafted map features the magnificent natural harbor of Pensacola on the Florida panhandle. The town, with its fort and carefully laid out streets is featured in the left-centre of the map. Another settlement "Campbell Town" is located further up the harbour toward where the entrance of the "Scambia" (Escambia) River. The borders of various land grants are demarcated, and the countryside is elegantly detailed with aquatint features, and coloured in a light brown-green wash. The chart precisely captures the features of the coast, showing how the harbor is protected by two sandy bars of land, the outer being Santa Rosa Island. The chart features a great deal of quantitative hydrographic information, and instructions to mariners are written in the lower right of the map, ensuring that it was by far the most accurate and comprehensive pilot for the harbor produced in the eighteenth-century. The present example is the first of two variants of this chart. It is important to note that the year this map was printed the region was caught up in the dramatic action of the Revolutionary War. The Spaniards, who had just joined the war on the American side, seized the British garrison at Fort Barrancas, and West Florida remained in their possession for the duration of the war. Joseph Frederick Wallet Des Barres was born in Switzerland, where his Huguenot ancestors had fled following the repeal of the Edict of Nantes. He studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before immigrating to Britain where he trained at the Royal Military College, Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. During this period he also worked with the legendary future explorer James Cook on a monumental chart of the St. Lawrence River. Upon the conclusion of the Seven Years War, Britain's empire in North America was greatly expanded, and this required the creation of a master atlas featuring new and accurate sea charts for use by the Royal Navy. Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence. With these extremely accurate surveys in hand, Des Barres returned to London in 1774, where the Royal Navy charged him with the Herculean task of producing the atlas. Gradually he was forwarded the manuscripts of numerous advanced surveys conducted by British cartographers in the American Colonies, Jamaica and Cuba. The result was The Atlantic Neptune , which became the most celebrated sea atlas of its era, containing the first systematic survey of the east coast of North America. Des Barres's synergy of great empirical accuracy with the peerless artistic virtue of his aquatint views, created a work that "has been described as the most splendid collection of charts, plates and views ever published" (National Maritime Museum Catalogue). The Neptune eventually consisted of four volumes and Des Barres's dedication to the project was so strong that often at his own expense he continually updated and added new charts and views to various editions up until 1784, producing over 250 charts and views, many appearing in several variations. All of these charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information, such that in many cases they remained the most authoritative maps of the regions covered for several decades. Following the completion of the Neptune, Des Barres returned to Canada, where he remained for forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, living to the advanced age of 103. National Maritime Museum, Henry Newton Stevens Collection HNS 173A & Catalogue III, 144, p.384; Sellers & Van Ee, Maps and Charts of North America and the West Indies , 1663. Seller Inventory # 19770

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About this Item: London, 1779. Engraved and aquatint map, period hand colouring. 14 lettered references, large inset with title as above. Rare revolutionary chart of the Hudson River showing the American defenses, on the eve of the Battle of Fort Montgomery. On October 6, 1777, a British force led by Lieutenant General Sir Henry Clinton attacked Forts Montgomery and Clinton from the landward side, where the American defenses were only partially completed. Support from cannon fire from British ships on the Hudson River that had passed through the chevaux de frise on the lower river. By the end of the day, both forts had fallen to the British, who burned the forts and tore down the stonework buildings. However, the battle was a pyrrhic victory for the British. The campaign against the forts caused delays in reinforcing General John Burgoyne at Saratoga, where Americans forced the British surrender ten days later at the Battle of Saratoga before Clinton's forces could arrive. The present map, which depicts the Forts and the River defenses prior to the battle, is from The Atlantic Neptune , the finest large scale sea atlas of the United States and Canadian Atlantic coastline ever produced. The maps in the atlas were produced over a seven-year period (1775-82), and are well known for their accurate portrayal of various sounds, bays, bars, harbors as well as navigational hazards. This atlas was used extensively by the Royal Navy during the American Revolution. Des Barres studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before continuing on to the Royal Military College at Woolwich. On the outbreak of the Seven Years war in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to be his aide-de-camp. From 1762, Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St.Lawrence, while his colleague, Samuel Holland charted the New England coast and further south. In 1774, Des Barres returned to England where he began work on the Neptune. His dedication to the project was so strong, that often at his own expense, he continually updated and added new charts and views up until 1784. That year he returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, and living to the advanced age of 103. The Atlantic Neptune was the first British sea atlas of her North American colonies, and one of the most important achievements of eighteenth century cartography. With an official commission from the Royal Navy, Des Barres published the first volume in London in 1775, which was soon followed by further volumes. Des Barres' monumental endeavor eventually featured over two-hundred charts and aquatint views, many being found in several states. All of the charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information. The Neptune met with the highest acclaim from the beginning, and is today widely regarded as superior to all other atlases produced during its time. Henry Stevens identified only a single state of this chart, issued coloured or uncoloured, which appeared in some examples volume four, part two of the Atlantic Nepture; the map, however, is not listed in the engraved list of maps for that section, and given the rarity was likely not issued in all copies. National Maritime Museum: Henry Stevens Collection: HNS156; Cf. Phillips, Atlases 1198; Hornsby, Surveyors of Empire: Samuel Holland, J.F.W. Des Barres and the Making of the Atlantic Neptune (2011). Seller Inventory # 33200

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About this Item: British Admiralty, London, 1782. One sheet only (of two). Engraved with aquatint, outline color, with an inset of the lower Chesapeake and lower courses of the York and James Rivers. Expert restoration. Very rare Des Barres chart of Yorktown. The [Atlantic Neptune] is the "most splendid collection of charts, plans and views ever published" (Rich). It was published at the charge of the British government for the use of the British Navy, and no expense appears to have been spared in the execution in order to render it a monument worthy of the nation. Due to the great cost of publication, this multi-volume atlas would probably have never seen the light of day if not for the worsening conditions in the American Colonies. It was imperative for the Admiralty to have a worthy sea atlas for the use of its fleet in American waters. Even then the work progressed slowly. The earliest charts were separately published and distributed to the Navy in 1775. New charts appeared regularly over the next seven years, with the emphasis shifting according to the course of events during the Revolution. Approximately 160 charts were produced before publication ceased in 1782, and no two examples of the atlas have the same collation. The [Plan of the Posts of York and Gloucester], dated 4th June 1782, was the last of the charts to be published. Very few copies were printed before the atlas was discontinued, and it is an extraordinary rarity. The map was included in only one of the thirteen sets of the Atlantic Neptune at the Library of Congress examined by Coolie Verner. It is the "first British prototype to detail the situation around Yorktown at the time of the surrender" (Verner, [Yorktown], p. 251). The second, by William Faden, did not appear until 1785. Present here is the right half only of the two sheet map. Degrees of Latitude , 66; Verner, "Maps of the Yorktown Campaign 1780 - 1781" The Mapping of America p. 252; Rich, Bibliotheca Americana, I , p. 249; Phillips, Atlases 1198-1204. Seller Inventory # 19753

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DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

Published by [London (1780)

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About this Item: [London, 1780. Aquatint and line engraving, period hand colouring. Very rare first state of Des Barres's chart of the coast of Georgia. This fine chart is from "The Atlantic Neptune," one of the finest large scale sea atlases of the United States and Canadian Atlantic coastline ever produced. The maps in the atlas were produce over a seven-year period (1775-82), and are well known for their accurate portrayal of various sounds, bays, bars, harbors as well as navigational hazards. This atlas was used extensively by the Royal Navy during the American Revolution. This is a detailed chart of the Georgia and upper Florida coastlines, covering an area between the mouth of the River May to John's Island. The towns of Savannah, Beaufort, Hardwick and Sunbury are shown and the coastal Parishes in Georgia are names. To the west is noted "Indian Boundary Line." This very rare first state is larger than the subsequent two states, without any detail added to the South Carolina coast and without the inset in the lower right corner added in or after 1780. Stevens 168a. Seller Inventory # 26675

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DES BARRES, J.F.W. (1721-1824)

Published by J.F.W. Des Barres in the 'The Atlantic Neptune', London (1779)

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From: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA) (New York, NY, U.S.A.)

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About this Item: J.F.W. Des Barres in the 'The Atlantic Neptune', London, 1779. Copper-engraved map, on two joined sheets, with original wash colour. A very rare and highly important chart of the Mississippi River, from 'The Atlantic Neptune,' the celebrated first British sea atlas of the American colonies. This map is one of the scarcest and most fascinating charts from Des Barres' Atlantic Neptune', and is the finest map of the region to be produced in the eighteenth-century. This chart was often missing from editions of the Neptune , and today very rarely appears on the market. This very elegant map charts the Mississippi River, as it forms curves around the numerous oxbows, from the site of modern-day Vicksburg, Mississippi in the north, down past Baton Rouge, Louisiana in the south. The quality of the wash colour and the aquatint shading used on the map creates a most elegant aesthetic, distinguishing Des Barres work for all contemporary cartographers. The present example is the second of two variants of this map that were produced. This chart was drafted during an especially fascinating and tumultuous time in the region's history. Most of the east bank of the river was under the auspices of Great Britain, having been ceded by Spain during the Treaty of Paris in 1763. In the same treaty, Spain was given control of New Orleans and the territory to the west of the river. In 1779, the year this map was printed, Spain actively sided with the Americans in the Revolutionary War. That year, the British outpost of Fort New Richmond, located on the site of Baton Rouge, was seized by the Spanish governor of Louisiana, Don Bernardo de Galvez. At the conclusion of the war, in 1783, the territory east of the Mississippi was awarded to the United States. While Des Barres' plan is far more detailed, and in a larger scale, his primary source for his work was the Course of the Mississipi , by Lt. John Ross, printed in London by Sayer & Bennett in 1776. In 1765, Ross was sent on an expedition up the river as far as Illinois, and after his return he created a manuscript map that added observations gleaned on his own surveys to the most recent French geographical information, especially that contained on the D'Anville map. One will notice that the east bank features far more detail than the opposing side, as Ross and other British surveyors were technically only permitted to explore the British side of the river. In the centre of the map is "Natches," currently celebrated for its great mansions, and for being one of the most beautiful towns in the south. Further down the river, the French settlement of Pointe Coupée, with its church and fort is depicted on the map. Further down, a series of buildings marks the sight of Fort New Richmond, where the river meets a bayou named after the founder of New Orleans, the Sieur d'Iberville. This east bank features the outlines of numerous British land grants, that in most cases, were not settled upon the outbreak of the Revolution. Joseph Frederick Wallet Des Barres was born in Switzerland, where his Huguenot ancestors had fled following the repeal of the Edict of Nantes. He studied under the great mathematician Daniel Bernoulli at the University of Basel, before immigrating to Britain where he trained at the Royal Military College, Woolwich. Upon the outbreak of hostilities with France in 1756, he joined the British Royal American Regiment as a military engineer. He came to the attention of General James Wolfe, who appointed him to join his personal detail. During this period he also worked with the legendary future explorer James Cook on a monumental chart of the St. Lawrence River. Upon the conclusion of the Seven Years War, Britain's empire in North America was greatly expanded, and this required the creation of a master atlas featuring new and accurate sea charts for use by the Royal Navy. Des Barres was enlisted to survey the coastlines of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence. With these extremely accurate surveys in hand, Des Barres returned to London in 1774, where the Royal Navy charged him with the Herculean task of producing the atlas. He was gradually forwarded the manuscripts of numerous advanced surveys conducted by British cartographers in the American Colonies, Jamaica and Cuba, of which the present map is based on the work of Samuel Holland, conducted in the 1760s. The result was The Atlantic Neptune , which became the most celebrated sea atlas of its era, containing the first systematic survey of the east coast of North America. Des Barres's synergy of great empirical accuracy with the peerless artistic virtue of his aquatint views, created a work that "has been described as the most splendid collection of charts, plates and views ever published" ( National Maritime Museum Catalogue ). The Neptune eventually consisted of four volumes and Des Barres's dedication to the project was so strong that often at his own expense he continually updated and added new charts and views to various editions up until 1784, producing over 250 charts and views, many appearing in several variations. All of these charts were immensely detailed, featuring both hydrographical and topographical information, such that in many cases they remained the most authoritative maps of the regions covered for several decades. Following the completion of the Neptune , Des Barres returned to Canada, where he remained for a further forty years, becoming a senior political figure and a wealthy land owner, living to the advanced age of 103. National Maritime Museum, Catalogue III, 143, p.384; National Maritime Museum, Henry Newton Stevens Collection, 172B ; Sellers & Van Ee, Maps & Charts of North America & West Indies, 791. Seller Inventory # 19678

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