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Abraham Lincoln

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From: The Raab Collection (Ardmore, PA, U.S.A.)

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Item Description: Lincoln Officially Commences the Civil War;He Orders the Blockade of the South. Abraham Lincoln. With war clouds hanging heavy over Washington in early April 1861 and the budding Confederate States of America a reality, the U.S. government seemed paralyzed and uncertain. Union General-in-Chief Winfield Scott was an exception; he developed a plan for the execution of the onrushing war. Scott's concept, later dubbed the Anaconda Plan, consisted of the blockade of the Southern seaports and control of the Mississippi River. This, he believed, would strangle the South by preventing it from exporting its crops for currency, preclude its receiving needed supplies and weapons to support its war effort, and isolate the western states from the eastern section of the Confederacy. Lincoln was aware that the blockading of ports was an act of war. In fact, since an act of war is, by implication, taken against another state, some in his cabinet argued that a blockade would constitute a tacit recognition of the sovereignty of the Confederacy, something the North was trying to avoid. Lincoln was less interested in the legal definitions than in the military utility of the plan, and he approved it despite the objections. On Friday, April 12, 1861, Confederate forces opened fire on Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor, initiating hostilities between the North and South. Lincoln immediately began moving to meet the crisis head on. The U.S. Army had less than 800 officers and only some 14,000 enlisted men, yet the federal government needed to mobilize for war. The only law in existence permitting the raising of additional troops was the Militia Act of 1792, which empowered the president to call out the militia to suppress insurrection. Using this law, on April 15, Lincoln issued a proclamation declaring that an insurrection existed, called out 75,000 men to put it down, and convened a special session of Congress for July 4.On April 19, Lincoln issued his proclamation blockading Southern ports. It provided that "a competent force will be posted so as to prevent entrance and exit of vessels" from the ports of the states in rebellion. Then, to make the proclamation official, he signed this document, authorizing "the Secretary of State to affix the Seal of the United States to a Proclamation setting on foot a Blockade of the ports of the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas." The seal was then affixed to the blockade proclamation, which was announced that day. It was a de facto declaration of war by the Union against the Confederacy. By the end of 1861, over 250 warships were on duty, with 100 more under construction. By 1865, some 600 ships were patrolling the Confederate coastline. Moreover, as the war progressed, the Union also intensified the blockade's effectiveness by capturing or sealing off a growing number of Southern ports. The storied blockade-runners were increasingly stymied. In the blockadeÕs first year, their chance of capture was one in ten. By 1864, the odds had become one in three, and by 1865, one in two. Strategically, the blockade was decisive. It limited both the import of military and other needed supplies and the export of income-producing cotton. "The blockade reduced the South's seaborne trade to less than a third of normal. And of course the Confederacy's needs for all kinds of supplies were much greater than the peacetime norm. As for cotton exports,.the half-million bales shipped through the blockade during the last three years of war compared rather poorly with the ten million exported in the last three antebellum years.[And] the blockade was one of the causes of the ruinous inflation that reduced the Confederate dollar to one percent of its original value by the end of the war." (James McPherson in Battle Cry of Freedom)." The authoritative Historical Times Encyclopedia Illustrated of the Civil War states ÒHistorians generally agree that the blockade, with more than 600 ships, Bookseller Inventory # 7590

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A superb collection of manuscripts signed by: LINCOLN, ABRAHAM
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Item Description: 1865. No Binding. Book Condition: Very Good. An outstanding collection of three Lincoln autograph items and relics relating to his death. Letters, documents, a newspaper, and relics from Lincoln’s deathbed (details below). Generally in very good condition and well-suited for display. Elizabeth Hutter was one of the most prominent Northern women in the fight to preserve the Union. During the Civil War, Elizabeth and her husband provided food and supplies to Federal recruits and volunteered at military hospitals. After First Bull Run and Gettysburg, Elizabeth traveled to the battlefields to aid the wounded, once under a special pass courtesy of Lincoln. She co-chaired a committee of the June 1864 Great Central Fair to raise funds for the U.S. Sanitary Commission, raising $250,000 for Union military hospitals. Lincoln himself attended the grand event in Philadelphia. Elizabeth is known to have met and corresponded with Lincoln on a number of occasions. In 1863 she secured Lincoln’s endorsement of her proposed earmuffs to warm soldiers’ ears! In October 1864, Secretary of War Edwin Stanton appointed Elizabeth’s brother, Jacob A. Shindel, as Assistant Quartermaster of Volunteers with the rank of Captain. According to that appointment (item A), Jacob was to report to Maj. Gen. Edward Canby, commander of the Military Division of Western Mississippi, based in New Orleans. Mrs. Hutter visited Lincoln in the White House on November 4, 1864 to discuss her ideas about establishing homes for war orphans (Lincoln Day by Day). At that meeting she also intervened on behalf of her brother to secure him a better posting. This collection includes a note signed by Lincoln instructing Stanton to receive his friend, declaring, “I really wish Mrs. Hutter to be obliged in this case. She is one of the very best friends of the soldiers ” (item A). At the same time Lincoln submitted a document to the Quarter Master General’s office in support of the appointment (item C). Stanton acceded to Lincoln’s wishes, for the following day Lincoln amended the appointment, writing “Capt. Shindel will report to Gen. W. T. Sherman, instead of to Gen. Canby as within directed. A. Lincoln Nov. 5. 1864” (item D). Sherman had recently captured Atlanta and was about to commence the March to the Sea. THE ASSASSINATION RELICS include a piece of the blood-stained bandage from Lincoln's head, feathers from the pillow on which he lay, and a letter from the man in whose room he died. Please inquire for more details. Bookseller Inventory # ABE-18022546299

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Item Description: In a remarkable and extraordinarily rare Lincoln letter to the head of the U.S. Senate, he requests that the Senate remain in session to finalize the historic measureFrom Section 9 of the Act: ÒAnd be it further enacted, That all slaves of persons who shall hereafter be engaged in rebellion against the government of the United States, or who shall in any way give aid or comfort thereto, escaping from such persons and taking refuge within the lines of the army; and all slaves captured from such persons or deserted by them and coming under the control of the government of the United StatesÉshall be forever free of their servitude, and not again held as slaves.ÓAs an individual, Lincoln hated slavery. Before the Civil War, as a Republican, he wished to exclude it from the territories as the first step to putting the institution, as he said in his House Divided speech, Òin the course of ultimate extinction.Ó But as he took office as president of the United States, Lincoln was bound by a Constitution that protected slavery in the states where it existed. With the warÕs outbreak, as commander in chief of the armed forces pursuant to the Constitution, Lincoln had to worry about the support of the four border slave states and the Northern Democrats. These groups probably would have turned against the war for the Union if the Republicans had made a move against slavery in 1861.With Union armed forces moving South and establishing positions in Confederate territory, the issue of what to do with slaves arose very quickly. Slaves were the most conspicuous and valuable property in the region. They raised food and fiber for the Southern war effort, worked in munitions factories, and served as teamsters and laborers in the Confederate Army. General Benjamin Butler, commander of Union forces occupying a foothold in Virginia at Fortress Monroe on the mouth of the James River, provided a legal rationale for the seizure of slave property. When three slaves who had worked on rebel fortifications escaped to ButlerÕs lines in May 1861, he declared them contraband of war and refused to return them to their Confederate owner. Here was an opening wedge for emancipation, and hundreds of such ÒcontrabandsÓ voted with their feet for freedom by escaping to Union lines in subsequent months. Some Union commanders gave them shelter and protection; others returned them to masters who could prove their loyalty to the United States.To reduce the ambiguity of this situation, on August 6, 1861, Congress passed the First Confiscation Act, which authorized Union seizure of rebel property. It stated that all slaves who fought with or worked for the Confederate military services were freed of further obligations to their masters. It placed the slaves in Union custody, but did not settle their status. Lincoln was reluctant to sign the act; he felt that, in light of the Confederacy's recent battlefield victories, the bill would have no practical effect and might be seen as a desperate move. He was also worried that it could be struck down as unconstitutional, which would set a precedent that might derail future attempts at emancipation. Lincoln was hoping to convince the border states to initiate a system of gradual emancipation with compensation for slave owners. Only personal lobbying by several powerful Senators persuaded Lincoln to sign the legislation. Lincoln gave Attorney General Edward Bates no instructions on enforcing the bill, and few confiscations occurred. The measure did little to satisfy the Radicals in Congress, who wished to abolish slavery entirely, and in December 1861, Senator Lyman Trumbull introduced a stronger bill that, among other things, provided for the liberation of slaves confiscated from the rebels - a controversial move that Lincoln could not then support. But it did get him thinking about what form of emancipation he would accept.But 24 days after the First Confiscation Act was passed, Union General John C. Fremont, seeing it as a licens. Bookseller Inventory # 11151

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN

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Item Description: 1863. No binding. Book Condition: Fine. Autograph Letter Signed "A. Lincoln" as President, to Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton, May 23, 1863. "Executive Mansion, Washington" stationery, 2 pp. on one sheet, 7 3/4 x 9 3/4 in. With front panel of original envelope, to which Lincoln has added an Autograph Note Signed, and Stanton has also added an Autograph Note Signed. Less than six years after he successfully sued the Illinois Central for legal fees, President Lincoln faces another problem with the railroad, now vital for the transportation of Union troops. In another dispute over payments, he tells his Secretary of War, "If I had the leisure which I have not, I believe I could settle it; but prima facie it appears to me we better settle the account ourselves." TranscriptExecutive Mansion Washington, May 23, 1863Hon Secy of War My dear Sir,In order to construct the Illinois Central Railroad, a large grant of land was made by the United States to the State of Illinois, which land was again given to the Railroad Company by the State, in certain provisions of the Charter. By the U.S. grant, certain previleges [sic]were attempted to be secured from the contemplated Railroad to the U.S., and by the Charter certain per centage of the income of the road was to be from time to time paid to the State of Illinois. At the beginning of the present war the Railroad did certain carrying for the U.S. for which it claims pay; and, as I understand, the U.S. claims that at least part of this the road was bound to do without pay. Though attempts have been made to settle the matter, it remains unsettled; meanwhile the Road refuses to pay the per-centage to the State. This delay is working badly; and I understand the delay exists because of there being no definite decision whether the U.S. will settle its own account with the Railroad, or will allow the State to settle it, & account to the State for it. If I had the leisure which I have not, I believe I could settle it; but prima facie it appears to me we better settle the account ourselves, because that will save us all question as to whether the State deals fairly with us in the settlement of our account with a third party - the R.R. I wish you would see Mr. Butler, late our State Treasurer, and see if something definite can not be done in the case. Yours truly, A Lincoln"Historical BackgroundLincoln had a long prior relationship with the Illinois Central Railroad. In 1851, although not a member of the state legislature, he participated in the struggle over the passage of the railroad's charter. Its 705 mile-long track was completed in 1856, making it the longest in the country. Lincoln represented the Illinois Central in 45 cases in the 1850s, mostly as defense attorney. The Mr. Butler mentioned was William Butler (1797-1876). He and Lincoln became friends when Butler was Clerk of the Sangamon County Circuit Court (1836-1841) and Lincoln a circuit lawyer. Butler later served as Illinois State Treasurer (1859-1862).Illinois had granted the railroad an exemption for all state taxes on the condition that it pay an annual "charter tax." However, the McLean County assessor levied a $428.57 tax on the railroad's 118 acres in that county. The railroad claimed that the General Assembly act chartering the railroad exempted it from such taxes. The railroad retained Lincoln and sued to prevent the County from selling railroad land to pay taxes. The parties agreed to go to the Illinois Supreme Court, where the only question would be whether the county had a lawful right to tax the railroad's property. In Illinois Central RR v. McLean County, Illinois & Parke, Justice Scates ruled that the charter was constitutional and that the legislature and the state could exempt property from taxation. Lincoln received $200 for his services in both courts. After consulting with fellow attorneys, Lincoln told the railroad he deserved more. According to the "Law Practice of Abraham Lincoln" website (www.lawpracticeofa. (See website for full description). Autograph Letter Signed. Bookseller Inventory # 22131

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LINCOLN Abraham EVERETT Edward

Used First Edition

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From: Bauman Rare Books (Philadelphia, PA, U.S.A.)

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Item Description: 1863. First Edition. "(LINCOLN, Abraham) EVERETT, Edward. An Oration Delivered on the Battlefield of Gettysburg, (November 19, 1863) at the Consecration of the Cemetery Prepared for the Interment of the Remains of Those Who Fell in the Battles of July 1st, 2d, and 3d, 1863. New York: Baker & Godwin, 1863. Octavo, original pale peach publisher's printed wrappers; pp. 48. $60,000.Rare first book-form appearance of Lincoln's magnificent Gettysburg Address, scrawled, according to legend, on scratch-paper and envelopes, corresponding almost exactly to the spoken version transcribed by Associated Press reporter Joseph L. Gilbert, in original wrappers.The Gettysburg Address, a few short lines scrawled, according to legend, on scratch-paper and the backs of envelopes, is one of America's most cherished documents. As noted by David Mearns of the Library of Congress, "Touch any aspect of the Address and you touch a mystery"—one immersed in history. Before a large crowd assembled at Gettysburg, orator Edward Everett delivered his address as President Lincoln waited on the platform, occasionally "removing his speech and glancing over it before returning it to his pocket As Everett started back to his seat, Lincoln stood to clasp his hand and warmly congratulate him the 'flutter and motion of the crowd ceased the moment the President was on his feet' Lincoln put on his steel-rimmed spectacles and glanced down at his pages. Though he had had but a brief time to prepare the address, he had devoted intense thought to his chosen theme for nearly a decade giving truth to the phrase 'all men are created equal' 'Four score and seven years ago,' he began" (Goodwin, Team of Rivals, 585-6). This work paid "unforgettable justice to the thousands of young Americans who had struggled with incredible bravery" (Bruce Catton). "The Washington Chronicle of 18-21 November reported extensively on this ceremony and included a verbatim text of 'Edward Everett's Great Oration' On the fourth day it noted in passing that the President had also made a speech, but gave no details. When it came to the separate publication on 22 November, Everett's 'Oration' was reprinted from the standing type, but Lincoln's speech had still to be set up. It was tucked away as a final paragraph on page 16 of the pamphlet. It was similarly treated when the meanly produced leaflet was replaced by a 48-page booklet published by Baker and Goodwin of New York in the same year" (PMM 351). This is that New York printing, with Lincoln's Address on page 40. This edition was preceded only by the exceptionally rare 16-page pamphlet, The Gettysburg Solemnities, known in only three copies. This printing corresponds almost exactly to the spoken version transcribed by Associated Press reporter Joseph L. Gilbert, with the omission of "poor" in "our poor power to add or detract," and correcting "refinished" to "unfinished work." Wills, 191-204; 261-263. Howes E233. Sabin 23263. Streeter 1747. Monaghan 193. Grolier, American 100, 72 (note). Only most minor wear to spine. A fine copy, most rare and desirable in such beautiful condition.". Bookseller Inventory # 106581

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Item Description: A rare war-date letter, on engraved letterhead, of the President to Major General Meade, seeking Meade's approval for an arrangement that would lead to a donation of $200 per month for the needy soldiersIn March 1864, Ulysses S. Grant was appointed by President Abraham Lincoln commander of the Union Armies. His headquarters would be with the Army of the Potomac, commanded by Gen. George G. Meade. So though Meade would retain his post as leading that army, Grant would be his superior, in command the actions of Meade's army and the other Union forces. Grant developed a strategy to defeat the Confederacy by placing his army between the rebel capital of Richmond and Gen. Robert E. LeeÕs Army of Northern Virginia. In his Spring offensive in 1864, Grant and Meade confronted Lee's army a number of times in very bloody engagements in which both sides suffered great losses. The Battles of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania were essentially draws but resulted in huge casualties. After each battle Grant's armies moved southeast to try to create a wedge between Lee and Richmond, but Lee's army successfully followed up the engagements by foiling that maneuver.The United States Sanitary Commission cared for the Union's sick and wounded soldiers and promoted clean and healthy conditions in army camps. It held fairs in certain large cities around the country, mainly in 1863-4, to raise funds for its activities. LincolnÕs personal assistance to benefit these fairs is well known, as he contributed notes, documents and signatures to be sold or auctioned at the fairs. It turns out that he also intervened on behalf of others seeking to donate to the fairs.A little known aspect of the war relates to the material left behind by the soldiers, who left a trail behind them as they moved. This included clothing and other rags that they no longer needed, were useless in their present form, or which they had to discard because the loads they carried in their backpacks were too heavy. One enterprising former soldier, John C. Swift, who had served in the Union Army from 1861-1863, wrote Lincoln on March 4 and March 9, 1864, offering to pay $200 per month to the Sanitary Commission for the exclusive privilege of picking up clothing cast off by Meade's and Grant's army. This subject touched close to Lincoln's heart so he intervened directly Meade, though it was during a period of intense conflict, when tens of thousands were fighting and dying. But realizing that there might be logistic issues, rather than insist, Lincoln left the decision up to Meade, even while indicating his own willingness.Autograph letter signed, on engraved Executive Mansion letterhead, Washington, May 25,1864, to "Major General Meade, Army of Potomac. Mr. J. C. Swift wishes a pass from me to follow your army to pick up rags and cast-off clothing. I will give it to him if you say so, otherwise not. A. Lincoln."If Meade responded, history does not take note of that response, an unsurprising development given the hostilities in which his troops were involved at the time. It is noteworthy that knowing this, Lincoln still chose to intervene on Swift's behalf, a testament to Lincoln's interest in the well-fare of the soldiers cared for by the Sanitary Commission.Just days later, the Battle of Cold Harbor would commence. Bookseller Inventory # 10921

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An Oration delivered on the Battlefield of: LINCOLN, Abraham (1809-1865);
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Item Description: Baker & Godwin, New York, 1863. 8vo. (9 x 5 5/8 inches). 48pp. Publisher's lettered wrappers, publisher's ad on rear wrapper. (Repair to paper spine). Within a modern box. "Four score and seven years ago.": the earliest publication of the Gettysburg Address in book form, preceded only by the exceptionally rare sixteen-page pamphlet, The Gettysburg Solemnities, known in only three copies. Lincoln made his speech at the dedication of a cemetery on the Gettysburg battlefield some four months after the bloody and pivotal battle that turned the tide of the Civil War in favor of the Union. Lincoln's speech was preceded by an address from Edward Everett, the most famous orator of his day. Everett's speech took some ninety minutes to deliver, and is largely forgotten. Lincoln's speech, delivered in only a few minutes, is immortal. It is a supreme distillation of American values, and of the sacrifices necessary for the survival of liberty and freedom. "The Washington Chronicle of 18-21 November reported extensively on this ceremony and included a verbatim text of 'Edward Everett's Great Oration.' On the fourth day it noted in passing that the President had also made a speech, but gave no details. When it came to the separate publication on 22 November, Everett's 'Oration' was reprinted from the standing type, but Lincoln's speech had to be set up. It was tucked away as a final paragraph on page 16 of the pamphlet [The Gettysburg Solemnities]. It was similarly treated when the meanly produced leaflet was replaced by a 48-page booklet published by Baker and Godwin of New York in the same year" (PMM). Lincoln's address appears on page 40, and parenthetical notes are added indicating "applause" and "long-continued applause." A diagram on page 32 gives the details of the Soldiers' National Cemetery at Gettysburg. Howes E232, "b"; Monaghan 193; Grolier, American 100, 72 (note); Streeter Sale 1747; Sabin 23263; cf. Printing and the Mind of Man 351; Garry Wills, Lincoln at Gettysburg, pp.191-204. Bookseller Inventory # 31428

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Complete Works of Abraham Lincoln: LINCOLN, Abraham

LINCOLN, Abraham

Published by Tandy-Thomas, New York (1905)

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Item Description: Tandy-Thomas, New York, 1905. hardcover. Extremely rare and beautiful set of the Presidential Edition, limited to only 50 copies. Lacking the 24th volume containing original documents. Edited by Nicolay & Hay. 12 volumes, bound in 23. Presidential Edition. 1 of only 50 copies printed. Extra illustrated edition with a profusion of fine engraved portraits, views and maps, photogravures, and facsimile letters. The frontispiece in each volume is an original color watercolor depicting a log cabin. Tall 8vo, superbly bound in full crimson morocco with lovely gilt floral devices on all boards and spines; ornate inner dentelles and green morocco doublures; green silk moire endpapers; uncut edges, top edge gilt. New York: Tandy-Thomas Company, (1905). Fine. Bookseller Inventory # 256401

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Item Description: New York: Baker & Godwin, 1863., 1863. 48pp. Publisher's printed wrappers, publisher's advertisement on rear wrapper. Repair to paper spine. Very good. In a cloth box, leather label. Rare first appearance in book form of Lincoln's magnificent Gettysburg Address. This edition was preceded only by the exceptionally rare sixteen- page pamphlet, THE GETTYSBURG SOLEMNITIES, known in only three copies. Lincoln made his speech at the dedication of a cemetery on the Gettysburg battlefield some four months after the bloody and pivotal battle that turned the tide of the Civil War in favor of the Union. His speech was preceded by an address by Edward Everett, the most famous orator of his day. Everett's speech took some ninety minutes to deliver, and is largely forgotten. Lincoln's speech, delivered in only a few minutes, is immortal. It is a supreme distillation of American values, and of the sacrifices necessary for the survival of liberty and freedom. "The WASHINGTON CHRONICLE of 18-21 November reported extensively on this ceremony and included a verbatim text of 'Edward Everett's Great Oration.' On the fourth day it noted in passing that the President had also made a speech, but gave no details. When it came to the separate publication on 22 November, Everett's 'Oration' was reprinted from the standing type, but Lincoln's speech had to be set up. It was tucked away as a final paragraph on page 16 of the pamphlet [THE GETTYSBURG SOLEMNITIES]. It was similarly treated when the meanly produced leaflet was replaced by a 48-page booklet published by Baker and Godwin of New York in the same year" - PMM. Lincoln's address appears on page 40, and parenthetical notes are added indicating "applause" and "long-continued applause." A diagram on page 32 gives the details of the Soldiers' National Cemetery at Gettysburg. HOWES E232, "b." MONAGHAN 193. GROLIER AMERICAN 100, 72 (note). STREETER SALE 1747. SABIN 23263. PRINTING AND THE MIND OF MAN 351 (ref). Garry Wills, LINCOLN AT GETTYSBURG, pp.191-204. Bookseller Inventory # WRCAM 49250A

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LINCOLN, Abraham.

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Item Description: 1863. No Binding. Book Condition: Very Good. No Jacket. ("A. Lincoln") in black ink on Executive Mansion, Washington, letterhead, March 18, 1863. 5" x 8", 1 page with integral leaf. Very good. Integral blank with an autograph endorsement signed by Holt and clerical endorsement from the Adjutant General's office. To Judge Advocate General Joseph Holt: Lincoln requests his Judge Advocate General to investigate the "Strong Mitigating Circumstances" surrounding the court-martial of a member of the West Point Class of 1861. "It is said Lieut. John Benson [Williams], of the 3rd regular infantry, as been sentenced by a Military Commission, to be dismissed the service. I have some reason to believe there are strong mitigating circumstances in his case, which the Commission perhaps, did not deem competent for them to consider, I will thank you to procure the record, examine it and report it to me. . ." Holt forwarded Lincoln's letter to the Adjutant General, noting that "No record or report in regard to [the Williams case] has been received at this office." The letter was returned to Holt, accompanied by the record of William's court-martial and docketed "Please see papers within." After studying the record, Holt made a lengthy report to Secretary of War Stanton, March 30, 1863, which survives in the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library. Holt dismissed the "mitigating circumstances" referenced by Lincoln - Williams's supposedly "severe sickness" - and concluded that "It is evident that Lieut. Williams left his command on the battlefield and returned to Washington, without leave and in known violation of orders and of his duty. . . .[He] has shown himself disqualified for the profession of arms." On April 8th, Stanton, in turn forwarded Holt's deposition to the President, "as requested by his note on the 18th Ulto" (that is, the present letter). Lincoln ended the matter with his own terse endorsement on April 11th: "I decline to interfere in Behalf of Lieut. Williams" (Basler 4:169). Although referred to in Basler's note regarding Lincoln's endorsement, the present letter does not appear in "The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln". Inscribed by Author(s). Bookseller Inventory # 604602

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Published by Springfield, Ill. (1835)

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Item Description: Springfield, Ill., 1835. No binding. Book Condition: Very Good. Book. Minute book of the Sangamon County Circuit Court. Springfield, Ill., July 6, 1835 to July 7, 1838. 315 manuscript pages in the hand of Court Clerk William Butler, 7 1/2 x 12 1/4 in. A day-to-day accounting of the cases before the Sangamon County Circuit Court, this manuscript minute book offers insight into Abraham Lincoln's legal world. He is mentioned by name in two entries, and although not named, many of his other cases can be cross-referenced. The most important entry came on March 24, 1836, when he took the first step in formal legal certification:"Ordered that it be certified as to all whom it may concern that Abraham Lincoln is a man of good moral character." In early 1836, Abraham Lincoln was a 27-year-old bachelor in New Salem, Illinois, receiving a small stipend as a first-term state legislator which he supplemented with surveying work and an appointment as New Salem postmaster. In his spare time, he had been "reading law" in an effort to improve his career prospects. An Illinois law enacted three years earlier required prospective lawyers to "obtain a certificate procured from the court of an Illinois county certifying to the applicant's good moral character." A March 24, 1836 entry records this step, attesting to Lincoln's "good moral character."On September 9, 1836, Lincoln was granted a license to practice law in Illinois, and in a formal ceremony on March 1, 1837, he appeared before the clerk of the Illinois Supreme Court and took an oath to support the Constitution of the United States and of Illinois. Lincoln swore he would "in all things faithfully execute the duties of Attorney and Counselor at Law."As this minute book documents, he began quickly. By cross-referencing dates with the indispensable reference book, Lincoln Day by Day by Earl S. Miers, the author notes that Lincoln filed his first lawsuit plea on October 5, 1836. The minute book does not mention Lincoln by name, but does note the case: "Wooldridge vs. Hawthorn, deff ruled to give security by calling of cause." The case is mentioned again on March 14, 1837, where Miers tells us that Lincoln represented the plaintiff: "Dismissed at the defendant's cost." Numerous other Lincoln cases can be traced in this manner. Lincoln is later mentioned twice regarding the October 10, 1837 case of White vs. Harris, where "A Lincoln appointed guardian ad litem to William Nelson, minor."ProvenanceSotheby Parke Bernet's Roy P. Crocker sale, 11/28/1979, lot 229, to Forbes Collection. Swann 11/25/2014 lot 153.ConditionVery good. Clean and tight. Original ½ calf, rebacked and recornered; minor dampstaining, wear and foxing, Lincoln page worn with several minor tears not affecting text.SourcesEarl S. Miers, Lincoln Day by Day, (Washington: 1960) pp. I:56, 60, 70. Book. Bookseller Inventory # 23644

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Item Description: James Smithson, the great benefactor of America, was born in 1754, the illegitimate son of Hugh Smithson, the first Duke of Northumberland. Illegitimate children were not unusual among EnglandÕs 18th century nobility, but certain opportunities were closed to them; they could not become military officers or ministers of the Church of England, two careers aristocrats commonly pursued. However, the young man attended Pembroke College at Oxford University, and there became interested in the natural sciences. He became a mineralogist and chemist. If as a youth Smithson set out to establish his name respectably, he certainly succeeded, as his research, publications, and activities in science opened doors for him, and quickly gained him the regard of his peers. He was admitted as a Fellow of the Royal Society in London, a signal honor that made him part of the scientific elite. Meanwhile, Smithson inherited a substantial amount of land from his mother, and careful management of it brought him wealth. Smithson never married and had only one close relative, a nephew named Henry James Dickinson (who later changed his name to Hungerford). In his will, Smithson left his fortune of £100,000 to his nephew. In the event of HungerfordÕs death, Smithson stipulated, the estate would pass his children - legitimate or illegitimate. But if his nephew died childless, he did Òbequeath the whole of my propertyÉto the United States of America, to found at Washington, under the name of the Smithsonian Institution, an Establishment for the increase & diffusion of Knowledge among men.Ó Why America remains a mystery. Smithson was born around 1765 in Paris, and despite his world travels, he had never once visited the United States. He is not known to have been in regular communication with any Americans, and his papers - other than his will - never mention the United States. SmithsonÕs motivations for choosing to deed his estate to the citizens of a nation to which he seemingly had no connection may never be satisfactorily answered. Heather Ewing, SmithsonÕs biographer, suggests that his donation reflected the late-18th centuryÕs interest in a Òculture of improvement,Ó and a widespread belief that the United States would play an important role in advancing the arts and sciences. A handwritten note later discovered among SmithsonÕs papers suggests his decision was part of his search for legitimacy, perhaps even immortality. ÒThe best blood of England flows in my veins,Ó Smithson lamented, Òbut this avails me not. My name shall live in the memory of man when the titles of the Northumberlands and the Percys are extinct and forgotten.ÓIn 1829 Smithson died in Genoa, Italy. In 1835 SmithsonÕs nephew died childless, and SmithsonÕs lawyers informed American diplomats of the bequest. The gift was quite large for the time, almost equal to HarvardÕs entire endowment, which was then $600,000. Surprisingly to us today, the bequest flummoxed the government of the United States. President Andrew Jackson was unsure of the constitutional propriety of accepting the gift, and turned the matter over to Congress. Former President John Quincy Adams, then a Representative from Massachusetts, championed the gift as being consonant with Òthe spirit of the age.Ó However, Senator John C. Calhoun of South Carolina vigorously disagreed, proclaiming it Òbeneath the dignity of the United States to receive gifts of this kind from anyone.Ó He also worried about overstepping and the Federal government exercising too much power, saying ÒWe would enlarge our grant of power derived from the States of this Union.Ó The debate went on for eight years. But meanwhile, in July 1836, Congress at least agreed to send former Attorney General Richard Rush as envoy to London to secure the funds.Rush spent nearly two years at the Court of Chancery, arguing for the validity of the will and pledging Òthe faith of the United StatesÓ that the institution would indeed be built. He had to overcome formidable. Bookseller Inventory # 10871

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LINCOLN, Abraham.

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Item Description: 1863. No Binding. Book Condition: Very Good. No Jacket. ("Abraham Lincoln") in black ink on partially printed and accomplished in manuscript. Washington, DC, September 14, 1863. 7 1/2" x 9". Framed in a wooden frame, linen mat with fillets, halftone photograph of Lincoln, map of New York, and metal name plate. Framed size: 19 3/8" x 24 1/4". Document calling for a draft quota for the 11th District of New York. Lincoln's draft call of 1,945 troops for the 11th District, which includes Orange and Sullivan counties, issued not long after the July 1863 draft lottery sparked 5 days of rioting amongst New York City's German and Irish immigrants. Not located in Basler. Lincoln called a special cabinet meeting at 11 a.m. on September 14 to discuss decisions of certain judges releasing drafted men by writ of habeas corpus. (see Miers p. 207 "Lincoln Day by Day"). Signed by Author(s). Bookseller Inventory # 604915

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LINCOLN, Abraham.

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Item Description: 1864. No Binding. Book Condition: Fine. ("A. Lincoln") in black ink and accomplished in Lincoln's hand. Washington, D.C., November 18, 1864. 7 9/16" x 2 3/4". Being check No. 14, payable to "Self" in the amount of $50.00, drawn on Riggs & Co. with lithographed vignette of the bank by Hatch & Co., 29 William St., New York. Discreet closed cancel puncture to center, else fine. Lincoln here withdraws fifty dollars, only ten days after he won his second United States Presidential election, defeating his former top general, Democratic candidate George B. McClellan, by a landslide. Five months later his would be assassinated. Signed by Author(s). Bookseller Inventory # 605152

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Item Description: A rare note of Lincoln showing his tenderhearted approach to the personal and often agonizing parts of the Civil War for familiesMany Patriotic young men on the West Coast had followed the Civil War in the newspapers and were anxious for a chance to join in the fight. But they knew that if they joined a California state unit, they would be stationed in the West, fighting Indians, guarding commerce trails, or doing garrison duty. In the late summer of 1862, a group of Californians contacted Governor John A. Andrews of Massachusetts and proposed to raise 100 volunteers to form a separate company in a cavalry regiment that was being raised in Massachusetts. The Governor agreed on condition that the Californians would provide their own uniforms and equipment. Officially they became company A of the 2nd Massachusetts Cavalry. This first contingent was soon followed by 400 more California volunteers who formed Companies E, F, L, and M. These Californians used their enlistment bounty to pay for their passage and set off by sea from San Francisco. At the Isthmus of Panama they debarked, transited the Isthmus by rail, then boarded a ship for the eastern seaboard. By April all the Californians were at Camp Meigs, Leadville, Mass. They were known as the "California Battalion". One of these men was Walter S. Barnes, who enlisted in San Francisco on February 5, 1863, and was assigned to Company E. The remaining companies in the regiment were raised largely in Boston and other places in the eastern Massachusetts. The main body of the regiment left Readville, Mass. for the seat of war May 11, proceeding to Washington. Loudoun County Virginia was an area of significant military activity during the Civil War. Located on the stateÕs northern boundary, the Potomac River, it became a borderland after Virginia's secession in 1861. Loudoun County's numerous Potomac bridges, fords, and ferries made it an ideal location for both Union and Confederate armies to cross into and out of Virginia. Likewise, the county's several gaps in the Blue Ridge Mountains that connected the Piedmont to the Shenandoah Valley were of considerable strategic importance. The opposing armies traversed the county several times throughout the war leading to many battles and skirmishes, and the county changed hands six during the course of the war, the last time being in the summer of 1864. There continued to be fighting in Loudoun even later, with the last territory being contested in the county on March 21, 1865, just 19 days before LeeÕs surrender.AshbyÕs Gap in Loudoun is a gap in the Blue Ridge Mountains, with the town of Upperville being the closest to the gap; the towns of Middleburg and Aldie are just east of it. In June 1863, Confederate General Robert E. Lee marched north to Pennsylvania for the Gettysburg Campaign, and General J.E.B. StuartÕs cavalry was ordered to hold the AshbyÕs Gap to prevent elements of the Union Army from interfering with LeeÕs plans. There was extensive fighting between the major cavalry units of both armies at Aldie and Upperville as Lee headed north. As Lee retreated and resettled in Virginia, possession of that gap again became a subject of dispute. On July 12, 1863, the 2nd Massachusetts Cavalry, in Col. Charles LowellÕs Brigade and under the command of Major Caspar Crowninshield, moved through Middleburg and Upperville. The 2nd Mass. sent some companies to AshbyÕs Gap, which was then in the hands of John MosbyÕs legendary Confederate Rangers, who operated widely in Loudoun throughout the conflict. CrowninshiedÕs men skirmished with the Confederates, driving them up the gap and then pursuing them three miles. At dayÕs end Federals held the gap, though they took casualties to gain the victory. Among these was Walter S. Barnes, who was killed and buried in Upperville.James Hughes of Bloomington, Indiana was elected to the House of Representatives as a Democrat in the 35th Congress and served from March 4, 1857-March 3, 1859. He was then app. Bookseller Inventory # 10850

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Published by [Springfield, Ill.] (1837)

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Item Description: [Springfield, Ill.], 1837. No binding. Book Condition: Fine. Autograph memorandum and plat (completely in Lincoln's hand), unsigned. [Springfield, Ill.], between October 1837 - June 1838. 1 p., 7 3/4 x 6 1/4 in. Between rail splitting, shop-keeping and lawyering, one of Lincoln's lesser-known professions was as county surveyor. Here, he combines skills, representing the widow Rhoda Hart in legal proceedings involving the sale of her deceased husband's land against a competing family member's claims. Lincoln and Hart prevailed.Most of Lincoln's surveys were made for town and county governments rather than individuals land holders. As a result, unlike those of George Washington, very few Lincoln surveys have ever come on the market. We find only two, without land plats, in major auction records of the last 40 years (one selling at the 1979 Sang auction, and again at Sotheby's in 1987; and the other, now being offered privately for $32,500, but frankly, it has no visual appeal.) Complete TranscriptMemorandum of the Real estate of Moses Hart, deceasedE. half S.W. quarter Sec. 24 Town 17 Road 7W. half same " " " "E. " N.W. " Sec. 24 17 750 acres of S. end E. S.W. " 13 17 7Wishes to sell all of the last mentioned tract and the North half of the last but one.Below this is a plat showing sections and plots, to the right of which Lincoln writes,"Prefers to sell on the premises."Historical BackgroundLincoln began studying surveying in the fall of 1833 in New Salem, Illinois, and served as Sangamon County surveyor. On August 4, 1834, the 24-year-old Lincoln was elected to the Illinois General Assembly. He also began to study law, and received his license to practice law two years later. In April 1837, he left New Salem and settled in Springfield, the new state capital. He then joined John T. Stuart as a law partner. In some cases the two disciplines blended. For example, in 1834 Lincoln did a survey for one David Hart. Then he represented the Hart family in real estate and litigation matters.In 1837, Lincoln represented Moses Hart's widow Rhoda Hart. In October, he obtained by a court her right to sell the real estate that had belonged to her late husband. In October 1838, in pleadings Lincoln filed in Hart vs. Sackett, he wrote that Mrs. Hart had followed the Court's instructions in selling the land, and now had to sue a neighbor to secure her rights pursuant to that permission: "Humbly sheweth unto your Honor your oratrix, Rhoda Hart Executrix of Moses Hart deceased, that at the last October term of this court an order was made by this court directing your oratrix to sell the real estate of the said Moses Hart deceased; that in obedience to the said order your oratrix has sold and conveyed the said real estate aforesaid in the parcels." A final Court Order concluded the case in favor of Rhoda Hart. Based on the history of the case, Lincoln penned this document between late October 1837 and late June 1838. This time frame placed it only a few years after his surveying career.More on Lincoln's Career as a SurveyorIn the fall of 1833, Carl Sandburg wrote, Abraham Lincoln entered into the most highly technical and responsible work he had known. Writing of it later, he said, "The Surveyor of Sangamon [County] offered to depute to A[braham] that portion of his work which was within his part of the county. He accepted, procured a compass and chain, studied Flint, and Gibson a little, and went at it. This procured bread and kept soul and body together."There were farm sections, roads and towns needing their boundary lines marked clear and beyond doubt on maps - more than the county surveyor, John Calhoun, could handle. On the suggestion of Pollard Simmons, a farmer and Democratic politician living near New Salem, Calhoun appointed Lincoln.Then for six weeks, daytime and often nighttime as well, Lincoln had his head deep in Gibson's Theory and Practice of Surveying and Flint's Treatise on Geometry, Trigonometry and Rectangular Surveying. From decimal fractions on. (See website for full description). Autograph Memorandum and Plat. Bookseller Inventory # 23770

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Lincoln, Abraham:

Published by Washington. April 11, 1865. (1865)

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Item Description: Washington. April 11, 1865., 1865. [1]p. Folio. Minor toning at edges. Near fine. Abraham Lincoln's final Presidential Proclamation, issued just three days before he was shot at Ford's Theatre, and a reminder that the Civil War was not yet over. This proclamation officially closed ports in the South, and is printed with a second proclamation leaving the port of Key West open. Prior to this time the southern ports had all been under blockade by the United States Navy. Now, however, with the Federal forces moving in, they were instead under control of the federal government once more, and action was needed to reassert administrative control over them. Some of the ports declared closed were in Union hands, while others were still controlled by the Confederacy. While the fall of Richmond on April 3, 1865 and Lee's surrender at Appomattox on April 9 are now usually considered the end of the Civil War, it did not seem so at the time. Major Southern forces were still in the field; Joe Johnston did not surrender to Sherman until April 26, Richard Taylor in Alabama and Mississippi until April 30, and Kirby Smith in the Trans-Mississippi until May 26. The Confederate government, while fleeing, was still able to command forces. Thus, for Lincoln, the War was still very much in its military phase when he issued this proclamation. Another reason was trying to prevent key Confederate leaders from fleeing; some such as Judah Benjamin did successfully get through the blockade. The official printings of Presidential proclamations from this period are all extremely rare; this final one by Lincoln is known in two other copies. Bookseller Inventory # WRCAM 49867

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Item Description: He acts the day the disastrous Battle of Fredericksburg ends, as wounded Union soldiers and ÒcontrabandsÓ flood into Washington The chaplain felt a calling and would work mostly without pay, selflessly donating his time and labor to the freedmen, and LincolnÕs note makes it clear he wants him employedOver 40,000 escaped slaves sought refuge and freedom in Washington, D.C. after the passage of the D.C. Emancipation Act in April 1862, which freed all enslaved persons in the District of Columbia. In addition, as the Union Army advanced on southern strongholds, thousands of slaves in their path made their way across Union lines to freedom, becoming what was known as "contraband.Ó The increasing numbers of contraband coming into Washington created a dilemma for the Federal Government and the Union Army responsible for both the protection of the capital and the pursuit of victory over the Confederates. How would these African-American men, women, and children find food, shelter, and medical care? In an effort to meet this challenge, in late spring of 1862 the Union Army established a camp and hospital to serve them. It became a safe haven for these former slaves and a center of government sponsored contraband relief efforts in Washington. The Contraband Camp and Hospital were constructed as one-story frame buildings and tented structures built by the Union Army to serve as temporary housing and hospital wards for black civilians and soldiers. Separate wards for men and women were established as well as separate tented wards for smallpox patients. In addition to the hospital wards, there was a stable, commissary, dead house (morgue), ice room, kitchen, laundry, dispensary, and living quarters. Within the camp thousands of contraband found refuge and medical care, and by the end of 1863, they had processed over 15,000 individuals and had 685 residents. The hospital hired nurses primarily from within the population of fugitive slaves and employed the largest number of black surgeons among U.S. military hospitals. In fact, the Contraband Hospital was one of the few medical facilities in Washington to treat African-Americans and broke the color barrier when it appointed Alexander T. Augusta surgeon-in-charge in May 1863.Rev. Isaac Cross was an minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church of New Jersey, with a history of working for relief of impoverished African-Americans. After the Civil War got underway, and wounded Union soldiers and masses of freedmen packed Washington, Cross decided to play an active role in serving their spiritual needs. In November 1862 Cross obtained a letter from the Newark Conference of his church stating that he was Òqualified, in their judgment, to receive the appointment of chaplain in the service of the United States.Ó This commendation was signed over a dozen officials and pastors in the church, a chaplain in the Hospital Department in New Jersey, H. J. Johnson, the colonel of the 8th N.J. Regiment, and by a major general in the New Jersey militia. Cross also had a certification dated December 1, 1862, from his Conference that he was a minister Òin good and regular standingÓ, and moreover ÒHis Christian and ministerial deportment are such as to commend him to the confidence of the Federal authoritiesÉÓCross brought these to President Lincoln in person on December 15, 1862. just as the disastrous Battle of Fredericksburg was winding up, and wounded soldiers were beginning to stream into the hospitals in and around Washington. To show LincolnÕs state of mind at the time, just three days later Lincoln would tell a friend, ÒWe are now on the brink of destruction.Ó Lincoln heard Cross express his desire to minister to those in the hospitals, specifically naming the Ebenezer Church and Odd Fellows Hall Hospitals in Washington. Autograph Note Signed as President, Washington, December 15, 1862, setting in motion the appointment of Cross that would culminate in his service as chaplain to the Contraband Camp and Hospi. Bookseller Inventory # 11130

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Published by Boston, Mass. (1863)

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Item Description: Boston, Mass., 1863. Softcover. Book Condition: Fine. Pamphlet. Proclamation of Emancipation, by the President of the United States, January 1st, 1863. [Boston, Mass., John Murray Forbes, ca. Jan. 20, 1863]. 8 pp., plus printed wraps, 2 1/4 x 3 1/4 in. "All persons held as slaves within said designated States and parts of States are and henceforward shall be free." This miniature Emancipation Proclamation of January 1, 1863 was distributed in the North and issued to soldiers in the field. As evidence of slavery's central role in the war and Confederacy, a quote from the Confederate Vice President is printedon the front wrapper: "Slavery the Chief Corner-Stone. / 'This stone (slavery), which was rejected by the first builders, is become the chief stone of the corner in our new edifice.' - Speech of Alex. H. Stephens, Vice President of the so-called Confederate States, delivered March 31, '61." General Andrew Jackson's proclamation "To the Free Colored Inhabitants of Louisiana," delivered September 21, 1814, welcoming black soldiers into his ranks, is printed on the back wrap. "Through a mistaken policy, you have heretofore been deprived of a participation in the glorious struggle for national rights in which our country is engaged. This no longer shall exist. As sons of freedom, you are now called upon to defend our most inestimable blessing. As Americans, your country looks with confidence to her adopted children for a valorous support, as a faithful return for the advantages enjoyed under her mild and equitable government. As fathers, husbands, and brothers, you are summoned to rally around the standard of the Eagle, to defend all which is dear in existence."Historical Background President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863. With this Executive Order, he took a decisive stand on the most contentious issue in American history, redefined the Union's goals and strategy, and sounded the death knell for slavery.The text of his proclamation reveals the major issues of the Civil War: slave labor as a Confederate resource; slavery as a central war issue; the status of African Americans who escaped to Union lines; courting the border states; Constitutional and popular constraints on emancipation; hopes of reunion; questions of Northern acceptance of black soldiers; and America's place in a world moving towards abolition. The President took the action, "sincerely believed to be an act of justice," knowing that it might cost him the election.Lincoln had always believed slavery to be immoral, and fought its expansion. At the same time, he recognized that the president did not possess the Constitutional power to abolish the institution. In a message to Congress on July 4, 1861, Lincoln stated that he had "no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with slavery in the States where it exists." Soon after, he began to describe slaves as an economic and military "element of strength to those who had their service," telling his advisers, "we must free the slaves or be ourselves subdued." As the war dragged on, the "military necessity" of emancipation grew more apparent. African Americans helped force the issue by "self-emancipation"; escaping to Union lines. With the Emancipation Proclamation, Lincoln dramatically tied the Union's war aims to ending slavery. Whether they approved or not, after January 1, 1863, Americans could no longer deny that emancipation was central to the Union war effort. Signing the Proclamation carried considerable risk for Lincoln, whose paramount aim was to restore the Union. He saw that anti-abolition sentiment was widely shared in large parts of the North and throughout the army. He also knew that the Union hold on the five slave states that had remained loyal (Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, Missouri, and West Virginia) was tenuous at best, and that maintaining it was absolutely critical. Lincoln reportedly said that while he hoped to have God on his side, he must have Kentucky. Though rea. (See website for full description). Pamphlet. Bookseller Inventory # 24310

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LINCOLN, Abraham

Published by [n.p.],, Massachusetts: (1863)

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Item Description: [n.p.],, Massachusetts:, 1863. FIRST EDITION. Broadside. 28 x 20 inches. Mounted on cloth, folded in quarters, minor splitting a center fold; light soiling and edgewear with minor chips (without loss of text), very light annotations in ink on verso (visible to recto right margin). Overall an excellent example of this rare and important broadside. First printing of the first proclamation of Thanksgiving as a national holiday. This original broadside produced in Massachusetts is formatted in two halves, the top being Governor John A. Andrew's announcement of Lincoln's Proclamation dated July 27, 1863, and the bottom being Lincoln's actual proclamation dated July 15, 1863, announcing that August 6 shall be set aside as a National Day of Thanksgiving. Though the exact printing date is unknown, it can be assumed that it was printed within the week following July 27.Thanksgiving was observed as a holiday since colonial times and each state would set aside its own day for celebration. This proclamation was the first time that the holiday would be celebrated on a set day nationwide, making it the first observed Thanksgiving as a national holiday.Later the same year, on October 3, 1863, Lincoln made a second proclamation again announcing Thanksgiving as a holiday, but this time in November, a date closer to the time most states had been celebrating it in the past. This earlier proclamation is actually the first time Thanksgiving was given national status, but because the second proclamation was widely accepted, the knowledge of this earlier one has been somewhat forgotten, making this piece a rare and important document in the annals of American history.Though this broadside is for the State of Massachusetts, no other broadsides from any other states announcing this date are known to exist, and only three other copies of this rare document are located through OCLC. Bookseller Inventory # 11224

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LINCOLN Abraham MESERVE Frederick Hill

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Item Description: 1944. "(LINCOLN, Abraham) MESERVE, Frederick Hill. Photograph album. WITH: Photographs of Abraham Lincoln. No place, no date; New York: Harcourt Brace, 1944. Loose album sheets (9 by 12 inches) featuring 191 photographic images. Housed in a cloth four-fold portfolio binder. WITH: Octavo, original navy cloth, original dust jacket. $22,000.Extraordinary album comprising over 191 photographs, primarily silver and platinum prints, of Abraham Lincoln, his family, and contemporaries assembled by Frederick Meserve. Accompanied by the first trade edition of Meserve's landmark work, accomplished in collaboration with Carl Sandburg, Photographs of Abraham Lincoln, featuring 100 images of the 16th President, in daguerreotypes, cartes-de-visite, stereoviews, and more by photographers including Matthew Brady, Alexander Gardner, and Alexander Hesler.Photographer "Frederick Hill Meserve was an important collector of Lincoln photographs. Sandburg asserts that 'it is quite probable that certain Lincoln photographs would not have come to light but for Meserve'" (University of Illinois). This unbound photograph album appears to confirm that assertion. In 191 photographs, some of which bear penciled identification in Meserve's hand, Meserve carefully creates a tableau of Lincoln's life in portraiture, capturing both Lincoln and his social circle—the friends, acquaintances, political figures, and social reformers who shaped him. The photographs, primarily silver and platinum prints, each measure 2-1/4 by 3-1/2 inches, and are inserted into double-sided loose album pages, which are housed in a cloth portfolio. The first portion of the album, hand-numbered from 1-100 in pencil, featured 94 portraits of Lincoln arranged chronologically. The subsequent pages house an additional 91 images, which include additional portraits of Lincoln, as well as Mary Todd Lincoln, Robert Todd Lincoln, John Wilkes Booth, John Brown, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Stephen Douglas, Jefferson Davis, General Grant, General Sherman, President Hayes, and many other luminaries of the period. The purpose of the album is unclear, but it may have served as a working set of prints used by Meserve as he prepared the first volume of Photographs of Abraham Lincoln for publication. In 1911, Frederick Hill Meserve privately published his landmark work, Photographs of Abraham Lincoln, featuring 100 photographs of the 16th President that he had collected over many years including daguerreotypes, cartes-de-visite, stereoviews, and other formats by photographers such as Matthew Brady, Alexander Gardner, and Alexander Hesler. Meserve published additional volumes over the ensuing years featuring other portraits of Lincoln and his associates, an endeavor that coincided with the growth of his personal photograph collection, which grew to over 70,000 pieces. It was only recently acquired by the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale. This trade edition of Photographs of Abraham Lincoln is preceded by numerous privately printed editions and privately printed supplements that commenced publication in 1911. Album extremely good, with mild toning to page edges and a few corners torn, some photographs lightly silvered. An exceptional photographic archive.". Bookseller Inventory # 107267

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LINCOLN, ABRAHAM.) Gardner, Alexander

Published by Washington (1865)

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Item Description: Washington, 1865. No Binding. Book Condition: Fine. The hanging of the Lincoln assassination conspirators. Within two weeks of Lincoln’s death, eight accused conspirators were in custody. President Andrew Johnson ordered a trial by military commission. After a seven-week trial in May and June, the commission retired to deliberate. On July 5 Johnson approved the verdicts and sentences including four death sentences. On July 6 the verdicts were revealed, and the very next day the four executions were carried out simultaneously. The convicted conspirators were stunned to learn that they were to be executed immediately. Alexander Gardner, the leading photographer in Washington, secured permission to document the carefully orchestrated event for which tickets were hotly contested. He made a series of ten images documenting the execution. This dramatic photograph shows the preparation for the hanging of the conspirators (from left to right): Mary Surratt (at whose boarding house the conspirators met) Lewis Powell (who attempted to assassinate Secretary of State William Seward) David Herold (who assisted John Wilkes Booth in his flight from Washington) George Atzerodt (who conspired to assassinate Vice-President Andrew Johnson) This photograph was the sole Alexander Gardner view used as a double-page spread in the standard work on the subject, which observed: “Adjusting the Ropes. The conspirators are bound, hooded, and fitted with nooses. On the right, Atzerodt, the last to be bound, recoils at what he sees” (Swanson and Weinberg, Lincoln’s Assassins: Their Trial and Execution, plate 190). Officials hold umbrellas to block the sun while preparations are made for the hanging. Men below the platform await the order to knock away the posts holding the trapdoors in place. This momentous image is one of the first news photographs. Albumen print (8 3/4 x 6 3/4 in.), mounted. Some chipping to mount. Manuscript caption on mount “preparing for the Execution of President Lincoln’s Conspirat[ors], Jail yard Washington, D.C. July 7th, 1865.” Some fading, but generally in good condition. Bookseller Inventory # ABE-15971286647

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Item Description: A rare full pardon, signed in the first year of his Presidency by Lincoln and Secretary of State William SewardLincolnÕs clemency is central to his legacy. His stern leadership combined with a soft heart makes him more human and resolute at the same time. During LincolnÕs presidency, under his clemency powers, he pardoned 324 persons for crimes for which they had been convicted by civil courts. The standards of kindness and mercy that he used were no different than those for convictions in military courts. Attorney General Edward BatesÕ pardon clerk later wrote of Bates that he discovered Òhis most important duty was to keep all but the most deserving cases from coming before the kind Mr. Lincoln at all; since there was nothing harder for him to do than to put aside a prisonerÕs application and he could not resist it when it was urged by a pleading wife and a weeping child.ÓCharles de Villier was a Frenchman an a native of Guadeloupe, and he and his father had come to the United States because, as he wrote in his pardon petition addressed to President Lincoln, of Òinternational troubles by which they lost their property.Ó They were teaching Òancient and modern languagesÓ to get by. ÒIn a moment of derangement of mind,Ó wrote de Villiers in his pardon petition, "he bought articles to the amount of $25 under 'false pretenses', was arrested and plead guilty and was sentenced to imprisonment of 18 months." ÒIn his heart,Ó de Villiers went on to say, Òhe was not guilty but intended to pay for the goods when he received a remittance from New York.Ó He was sent to jail. The petition is found in the Lincoln Papers in the Library of Congress, along with a letter de Villiers wrote the trial judge asking for clemency. The petition was endorsed by ten well connected Washington, DC residents, among them chaplain H.S. Stevens, and notably, H.S. Johnston, the man from whom the goods had been taken.Lincoln agreed to grant the pardon, but perhaps not buying de VillierÕs story, had one caveat: that de Villier leave Washington for at least 5 years, and leave promptly. Document signed, October 28, 1861, also signed by Secretary of State William Seward. ÒWhereasÉCharles de Villier was indicted and convicted for obtaining goods under false pretenses, and was by said Court sentenced to be imprisoned in the Penitentiary for the period of 18 months; and whereas the said Charles de Villier has now served out more than 6 months of his said term of imprisonmentÉ; And whereas it appears that this was his first offenseÉ; and whereas a large number of highly respectable citizens of the District of Columbia have earnestly brought me to extend the Executive ClemencyÉ; Now therefore let it be known that I Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of America, in consideration of the promises, divers other good and sufficient reasonsÉdo hereby grant unto him, the said Charles de Villier a full pardon on condition that he leave the District of Columbia within thirty days and do not return to the same within five years from the date hereof.ÓFull pardons signed by Lincoln and Seward are increasingly uncommon. Bookseller Inventory # 11026

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Item Description: Our records find no record of another such piece signed by Lincoln and his running mateUnusually, Lincoln puts strings attached, withholding a pardon and turning the ex-Confederate over to JohnsonÕs custodyThe 49th Tennessee Infantry was organized in December 1861 at Fort Donelson, Tennessee. Major Richard E. Douglass in Company B was appointed Adjutant. On February 16, 1862, it was captured at the fort and reported 300 engaged and 21 killed or wounded. Exchanged in November, the unit was assigned to General Maxey's Brigade in the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana. For a time it served at Port Hudson, then took an active part in the fight at Jackson in May 1863. By this time Douglass had left the Confederate service and returned to his farm in Montgomery County. But wartime Tennessee was divided and a hotbed of intrigue. Although the state became a part of the Confederacy, East Tennessee was strongly pro-Union before secession, and strongly pro-Union Tennesseans remained there and existed in pockets throughout the state during the war. As Union forces took ever more Tennessee territory, some locals who had originally sided with the Confederacy began to feel the war was lost and were ready to take the oath of allegiance to the United States, putting them in contention with those still loyal to the Confederacy. Meanwhile, partisans on both sides were out gunning for opponents. After being home about a year, Douglass got picked up and was sent to Rock Island prison, quite possibly on a claim that he was in violation of his parole received at Fort Donelson. Rock Island was a prison camp that once held thousands of Confederate soldiers. Conditions were poor, and thousands died there. Some people called it the Andersonville of the North.Friends of Douglass wrote Gov. Andrew Johnson to secure his pardon, and in their letter stated that Douglass had been out of the war for a year and was living as a good U.S. citizen. They urged his release. A portion of that letter survives, though without the names of the signatories making the request. It reads, ÒWe the undersigned friends and acquaintances of Mr. R.E. Douglass who is now a prisoner at Rock Island Barrack No. 69 beg leave to state that the said Douglass was once in the Confederate Army and service but had resigned his office of Adjutant and had been and remained at home for some ten months quietly pursuing his duties as citizen and farmerÉÓOn June 8, 1864, Lincoln had been nominated for President on his fusion National Union Party ticket, and Johnson had been nominated as his running mate. Just days later, Johnson turned to the President to address the Douglass case.Johnson had a reputation for being hard on Confederates, but he looked into the matter and found the pardon request justified. He endorsed it, writing ÒExecutive Dept., Nashville, Tenn., June 20, 1864. I have made myself acquitted with the facts in this case; and I recommend it as a fit case for the Executive Pardon. Most respectfully submitted, Andrew Johnson, Mil. Gov. Tennessee.Ó Lincoln, however, was apparently not completely persuaded, and took an action atypical for him. Instead of just allowing Douglass to take the oath of allegiance and be released, as was his custom, he instead put him on bail (which is no pardon) and released him into JohnsonÕs own custody, effectively turning him over to state authorities. Then any repercussions would be on JohnsonÕs watch. Autograph endorsement signed, Washington, June 28, 1864. ÒLet this man take the oath of Dec. 8th and be exchanged on bail to Gov. Johnson.Ó Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton then wrote, ÒReferred to Col. Hoffman to execute the order.ÓThis document is thus signed by both men as joint nominees, a combination of autographs on the same sheet that is exceptionally uncommon. It is also fascinating to see how Lincoln working with Johnson, choosing to handle JohnsonÕs request, complying but really throwing the ball back into JohnsonÕs court. Bookseller Inventory # 11060

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Lincoln, Abraham: Johnson, Andrew: Seward, William H.:

Published by Washington, D.C. May 29, 1865. (1865)

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Item Description: Washington, D.C. May 29, 1865., 1865. [2],4pp. Folio. Single folio leaf tipped onto a single folded folio sheet. Minimal edge sunning, else fine. A fine copy of the official government printing of various amnesty proclamations issued by Presidents Lincoln and Johnson during and just after the Civil War. The first page is a form circular from Secretary of State, William H. Seward, giving rules and regulations for administering and recording the amnesty oath, issued on May 29, 1865. Appended are copies of President Johnson's Amnesty Proclamation of the same date, and President Lincoln's proclamations of amnesty and pardon, dated Dec. 8, 1863 and March 26, 1864. Johnson issued his amnesty proclamation for the benefit of those in the Confederacy who had not availed themselves of Lincoln's earlier announcements. "There are eleven classes of people not included in Johnson’s amnesty, beginning with 'civil & diplomatic officers or otherwise domestic or foreign agents of the pretended Confederate government'" - Goodspeed. Seward's circular and the proclamations are sometimes each found separately, but are rarely found together. A rare and highly important item, with only three copies in OCLC, at the Lincoln Presidential Library, the Allen County Public Library, and the Lincoln Museum. Not in Monaghan. GOODSPEED 524:106 (without the Seward circular). OCLC 62879317. Bookseller Inventory # WRCAM 49950

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Item Description: The telegraph was the only quick link between Lincoln and the events in the field, and he spent untold hours in the telegraph office waiting for news from the frontAnson Stager would also create the most widely used - and most effective - secret code of the war; An appointment of the highest importanceThe War Department Telegraph Office was the scene of many momentous events in the Civil War. Located next to the Secretary of WarÕs office, it hosted an anxious President Lincoln on many occasions, as he would read the telegrams as they came in, waiting news from the front. During great battles, he would sit and wait for messages to come in one after another. It was also a place of debate and cabinet meetings, where Lincoln was accessible. He met Congressmen there, who went to the telegraph office to see him when he could not be found at the White House. All military dispatches necessarily passed through this office.The U.S. Military Telegraph Corps was formed in 1861, prior to which no such organization existed. The scale of the war required rapid communication, and the telegraph was the only practical method. The corps trained come 1,200 operators of the military telegraph throughout the war, and they served under the anomalous status of quartermaster's employees. Their work was of the most vital importance to the army in particular and to the country in general, and the exigencies and experiences of the war demonstrated the utility and indispensable importance of the telegraph, both as an administrative agent and as a tactical factor in military operations. In 1861, Anson Stager was a civilian with a knowledge of telegraph lines. He was the co-founder of Western Union, and the first president of Western Electric Manufacturing Company. After the Civil War broke out in April 1861, Stager was requested by Ohio governor William Dennison to manage the telegraphs in southern Ohio and along the Virginia Line. Stager obliged and immediately prepared a cipher by which he could securely communicate with those who had the key (notably the governors of Illinois and Indiana). He is the author of the first telegraphic cipher used for military purposes. When the cipher came to the attention of General George B. McClellan, he asked Stager to prepare a cipher for use in the field, which he did; it was later adopted as the official cipher of the War Department. Stager was acting as a patriotic volunteer at this time, without rank or compensation.He soon came to the attention of the right people in Washington. On October 28, 1861, Thomas A. Scott, Assistant Secretary of War, wrote to President Lincoln, referring to Stager as a man who had a plan for managing the military telegraph. Lincoln responded, ÒÉIf the Secretary of War has confidence in it, and is satisfied to adopt it, I have no objections.Ó Cameron summoned Stager to Washington, where Stager submitted a plan of organization for the new telegraphic operations. Cameron approved the plan, and, on November 11, Stager was appointed Captain and Quartermaster, so that he could assume his role as head of the War Department Telegraph Service.Special orders 313, dated November 25, 1861, read: ÒCapt Anson Stager, assistant quartermaster, is assigned to duty as general manager of the Government telegraph linesÉ. Commanding officers will also give such aid as may be necessary in the construction and repair of telegraph lines in the country in which troops are operating.Ó Thomas Eckert was named StagerÕs assistant.Upon taking over as Secretary of War in early 1862, one of the first acts of Edwin M. Stanton was a recognition of the importance of the telegraph. He moved the telegraph office adjacent to his own, and brought all telegraphic operations under his control at the War Department. This brought StagerÕs operation closer to him and to the President.Document signed, March 26, 1862, effective retroactively to November 11, 1861, an ornate, vignetted commission, with an eagle, cannons and flags, app. Bookseller Inventory # 11145

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Lincoln, Abraham]:

Published by New York. Nov. 20, 1863. (1863)

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Item Description: New York. Nov. 20, 1863., 1863. 8pp. printed in six columns. Large folio. Very minor foxing. Near fine. A fine, complete issue of THE NEW-YORK TIMES printing the Gettysburg Address on Nov. 20, the first date of the speech's printing. On Nov. 19, 1863, Lincoln delivered his great address at the dedication of a cemetery on the Gettysburg battlefield four months after the bloody and pivotal battle that turned the tide of the Civil War in favor of the Union. Lincoln's speech was preceded by an address from Edward Everett, the most famous orator of his day. Everett's speech took some ninety minutes to deliver and today is largely forgotten. Lincoln's speech, delivered in only a few minutes, is immortal. It is a supreme distillation of American values and of the sacrifices necessary for the survival of liberty and freedom. Much controversy surrounds the circumstances and content of the address as it was actually delivered at Gettysburg. The words spoken in the speech differ in the versions appearing in newspapers and the text which appeared in Washington several days later, which is now taken as the closest version to Lincoln's final intent because of its correspondence to the known manuscript versions. The most important newspaper version is the present one, based on the notes of THE NEW-YORK TIMES correspondent, and it was widely copied by other newspapers around the country. However, the circumstances of a windy day, and the reporter's shorthand may have interfered, as there is still dispute over how accurately it represents what Lincoln actually said, versus a final version which he may have altered after the fact. In his recent study of the Gettysburg Address and the evolution of its reception through history, Gabor Boritt pays special attention to the front-page reporting of this Nov. 20 issue of THE NEW- YORK TIMES. Lincoln's address, though printed in a center column near the top of the front page, is visually swallowed by the headlines and text surrounding it. This, as Boritt points out, includes an article on a speech by Rev. Henry Ward Beecher, which was given the front page's "place of honor" and received "superlatives within an inch of the president's Gettysburg remarks, which were reproduced with no comment" (Boritt, pp.138- 39). Years would pass before Lincoln's short speech was acknowledged as one of the greatest in American history. Together with examples from other newspapers of Nov. 20, 1863, this issue of THE NEW-YORK TIMES represents the first appearance of a version of the Gettysburg Address in print, although at variance with the version Lincoln disseminated. A remarkably good copy of this rare and important document. Gabor Boritt, THE GETTYSBURG GOSPEL (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2006). Shelby Foote, THE CIVIL WAR, A NARRATIVE: FREDERICKSBURG TO MERIDEN (New York: Random House, 1958). Bookseller Inventory # WRCAM 49167

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Abraham Lincoln

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From: The Raab Collection (Ardmore, PA, U.S.A.)

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Item Description: A very uncommon document signed by both On March 6, 1857, two days after President Buchanan was inaugurated, the Supreme Court issued a landmark decision in the Dred Scott case, holding that as a slave, Scott had no rights under the U.S. Constitution and thus no liberty to present a case in a Federal court. Further, since slaves were property, and since the Fifth Amendment spelled out that no person could be deprived of "life, liberty or property without due process of the law," the federal government was powerless to prohibit the practice of slavery anywhere in the Union. This decision appeared to undermine the Kansas-Nebraska Act, for in the assertion that the federal government was powerless to deprive an individual of his property, the corresponding powerlessness of a state government seemed implicit. While Stephen A. Douglas desperately attempted to reconcile the Dred Scott decision with his principle of popular sovereignty, Lincoln prepared to face off against him in the 1858 Senate election. Even as great events began to draw Lincoln in, he still had to attend to his law practice.The firm of Lincoln and Herndon handled about two dozen cases for S. C. Davis & Company, a St. Louis-based dry-goods wholesaler who sold sundries to local merchants. In many instances, these local stores didn't make enough money to pay their debts; and if the stores were in Illinois, S. C. Davis hired Lincoln and his partner to sue them. The documentary evidence suggests that Lincoln was not fond of these cases. He clearly saw himself as a mediator, wanting debtors to have an opportunity to pay their debts instead of having their assets seized. Lincoln and Herndon later turned S. C. Davis over to another law firm.On December 7, 1857, Lincoln filed praecipes in assumpsit (complaints for breach of contract) in the U.S. Circuit Court for the Southern District of Illinois for nine of the S. C. Davis cases. One of these was S. C. Davis & Co. vs. Henry J.D. Sanders. Document signed by Lincoln and Herndon, being a Bond For Costs, saying ÒWe enter ourselves as security for costs in this cause,Ó and promising to pay the court-assessed costs themselves if their client failed to do so. Document from their legendary practice signed by both Lincoln and Herndon are extremely uncommon. This is the second one weÕve had in our quarter century in business, and we recall seeing only two or three others over that entire span of time. Bookseller Inventory # 10629

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AN ORATION DELIVERED ON THE BATTLEFIELD OF: Lincoln, Abraham; Everett,
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Item Description: Baker and Godwin, 1863. Hardcover. Book Condition: Fine. No Jacket. 1st Edition. Baker & Godwin, New York, 1863. 8vo. 48pp. "Four score and seven years ago.": the earliest publication of the Gettysburg Address in book form, preceded only by the exceptionally rare sixteen-page pamphlet, The Gettysburg Solemnities, known in only three copies. Bound in recent hardcover. Several pages attached with recent restoration paper stubs. Lincoln made his speech at the dedication of a cemetery on the Gettysburg battlefield some four months after the pivotal battle that turned the tide of the Civil War in favor of the Union. Lincoln's speech was preceded by an address from Edward Everett, the most famous orator of his day. Everett's speech took some ninety minutes to deliver, and is largely forgotten. Lincoln's speech, delivered in only a few minutes, is immortal. It is a supreme distillation of American values, and of the sacrifices necessary for the survival of liberty and freedom. "The Washington Chronicle of 18-21 November reported extensively on this ceremony and included a verbatim text of 'Edward Everett's Great Oration.' On the fourth day it noted in passing that the President had also made a speech, but gave no details. When it came to the separate publication on 22 November, Everett's 'Oration' was reprinted from the standing type, but Lincoln's speech had to be set up. It was tucked away as a final paragraph on page 16 of the pamphlet [The Gettysburg Solemnities]. It was similarly treated when the meanly produced leaflet was replaced by a 48-page booklet published by Baker and Godwin of New York in the same year" (PMM). Lincoln's address appears on page 40, and parenthetical notes are added indicating "applause" and "long-continued applause." A diagram on page 32 gives the details of the Soldiers' National Cemetery at Gettysburg. Howes E232, "b"; Monaghan 193; Grolier, American 100, 72 (note); Streeter Sale 1747; Sabin 23263; cf. Printing and the Mind of Man 351; Garry Wills, Lincoln at Gettysburg, pp.191-204. Housed in a custom-made collector's slipcase. Bookseller Inventory # 1503132

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Lincoln, Abraham.

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Item Description: Soft cover. Book Condition: Very Good. ("Abraham Lincoln"), in black ink, Washington, February 10, 1862. Folio. Partially printed document on vellum accomplished in a secretarial hand. Blue wafer seal intact. Lincoln's signature is dark. Appointment of Ethan A[llen] Hitchcock to the rank of Major General of Volunteers. Boldly co-signed by Edwin Stanton, Secretary of War, and Adjutant General L. Thomas (a few small holes at the folds, else fine, fresh and dark). Lincoln (1809-65), 16th President of the United States (1861-65) and one of the most important figures in American history. Hitchcock (1798-1870), Graduated West Point in 1817; served in Florida war; later with Winfield Scott in Mexico. He was commissioned Major-General of Volunteers (as per this document) in 1862 and rendered many valuable services to Lincoln's administration and the Union Army (see Basler's Lincoln for numerous references to him). Signed by Author(s). Bookseller Inventory # 600008

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