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DARWIN, Charles Robert

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From: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller Inc. (New York, NY, U.S.A.)

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About this Item: [Drop-title]: For Private Distribution.Extracts from Letters addressed to Professor Henslow by C. Darwin. 31 pp. 8vo, bound in attractive green morocco-backed cloth over boards. [Cambridge: "Printed for Distribution among the Members of the Cambridge Philosophical Society," 1 December 1835]. First edition of Darwin's first separately printed work, and of the greatest rarity. This unauthorized pamphlet contains extracts from ten letters written to John Stevens Henslow (1796-1861), by Darwin during his five-year voyage on the Beagle. Henslow had been Darwin's botany professor at Cambridge and their friendship "was one of the most influential circumstances in his [Darwin's] early life."-ODNB. It was Henslow who obtained for him the post of naturalist on the Beagle. Darwin's letters were published without his knowledge; Henslow had read some of them before the Cambridge Philosophical Society and was responsible for printing this small pamphlet of extracts. The present work did introduce Darwin's name and some important observations to a small but influential group of scientists, and when he arrived back in England in the autumn of 1836 he carried with him something of a reputation as a geologist. Fine copy, preserved in a green morocco-backed box. From the library of Robert Crewe-Milnes, 1st Marquess of Crewe (1858-1945), British statesman and author (note on pastedown stating that the book was purchased by Maggs Bros. from the Crewe library). Accompanied by the 1960 privately printed facsimile. ? Freeman 1. Seller Inventory # 3678

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About this Item: Henry Colburn, London, 1839. First edition, an extraordinary presentation copy connecting two exceptional Victorians, inscribed by the Commander of the Beagle Robert FitzRoy (see below), the man who chose Darwin to accompany him on the epochal voyage. ?The voyage of the Beagle has been by far the most important event in my life, and has determined my whole career? (Charles Darwin, Life and Letters I, p. 61). ?The five years of the voyage were the most important event in Darwin?s intellectual life and in the history of biological science. Darwin sailed with no formal scientific training. He returned a hard-headed man of science, knowing the importance of evidence, almost convinced that species had not always been as they were since the creation but had undergone change ? The experiences of his five years in the Beagle, how he dealt with them, and what they led to, built up into a process of epoch-making importance in the history of thought? (DSB). The third volume comprises Darwin?s own journal of his voyage in the Beagle, which is the first issue of his first published book. It is ?is undoubtedly the most often read and stands second only to On the Origin of Species as the most often printed? (Freeman, 31). It is ?one of the most interesting records of natural history exploration ever written and is one of the most important, for it was on this voyage that Darwin prepared for his lifework, ultimately leading to The Origin of Species? (Hill I: 104-105). Volume I of the Narrative concerns the initial surveying expedition, 1826?30, under Philip Parker King in the Adventure, during which FitzRoy succeeded Pringle Stokes as commander of the accompanying Beagle. Volume II describes FitzRoy?s continuation and completion of the survey with the Beagle alone, ending in 1836. ?The surveys he carried out in South American waters established FitzRoy as a first-rate hydrographer and won for him the gold medal of the Royal Geographical Society (1837). Because his marine surveys were accurate to such a high degree they are still used as the foundation for a number of charts of that area? (DSB). Only one other complete copy of the Narrative in its original binding and inscribed by FitzRoy has appeared at auction (Christie?s South Kensington, September 21, 2005, lot 79, £33,600 = $60,752). A copy inscribed by FitzRoy but lacking one of the plates sold for £42,049 ($63,885) at Bonham?s, June 19, 2013, lot 43.Provenance: inscribed and signed on the half-title by the Captain of the Beagle, Robert FitzRoy, to ?Dr. Lee, LL.D., a tribute of esteem and respect from Robt. FitzRoy, Sept. 19th, 1856.? Also inscribed by Lee on the front pastedown, ?John Lee, Hartwell, a present from the accomplished author, 22 September 1856?, with Lee?s armorial bookplate on front pastedown in all volumes. John Lee (1783-1866) was an English philanthropist, astronomer, mathematician, antiquarian and barrister. Lee and FitzRoy were both pioneer meteorologists, and this is probably the reason for the gift of these volumes: Lee was a founder of the British Meteorological Society in 1839, and FitzRoy was instrumental in the founding in 1854 of the Meteorological Office of the Board of Trade, and was its first head. FitzRoy issued the first daily weather forecasts, published in The Times, and actually invented the term ?weather forecast?.?If it had not been for Robert FitzRoy, the name Charles Darwin would now be remembered, if at all, as that of a country parson with an interest in natural history, perhaps rather in the mould of Gilbert White, of Selborne. The theory of natural selection, which explains the fact of evolution, would be known from the work of Alfred Russel Wallace, who came up with the idea independently of Darwin, and whose work prompted Darwin to go public with his own ideas; we would be as familiar then with the term ?Wallacian evolution? as we are, in the real world where Robert FitzRoy lived, with the term ?Darwinian evolution? In that real world, FitzRoy is known, so far as he is wi. Seller Inventory # 4042

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Darwin, Charles. Assisted by Francis Darwin.

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About this Item: London: John Murray, 1880. 8vo, x, 592, 32 (ads dated May 1878) pp. Illustrated with 196 in-text woodcuts. Original green blindstamped cloth, backstrip titled in gilt, brown coated endpapers, hinges cracked, a little wear to crown and foot of backstrip, text block edges (but not pages) stained, an unsophisticated copy. First edition, first issue, inscribed in Charles Darwin's hand, "Elizabeth Darwin, From her Father". Presentation copies from Darwin, in his own hand, are exceptionally rare (most presentation copies were inscribed "from the author" by the publisher); a copy inscribed to a family member by Darwin himself is extraordinarily so. Elizabeth Darwin, known as Bessy, was Charles and Emma Darwin's youngest daughter, who lived at home until the death of her mother, and died in 1926. Very little is known about her. "Despite her constant presence in the house, only very occasionally does her name appear in any of the mountain of family letters" (Bowlby, Charles Darwin: A New Life, 408). After her mother's death, Elizabeth moved to a small house in Cambridge where she lived to be 78. The book is an extension of Darwin's work on movement in climbing plants to show that the same mechanisms hold true for flowering plants in general. Darwin was assisted by his son, Francis, who had become and accomplished botanist. The book was well reviewed and immediately sold 1500 copies. Freeman 1325. Seller Inventory # 110418

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DARWIN, Charles

Published by John Murray, London (1859)

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From: B & L Rootenberg Rare Books, ABAA (Sherman Oaks, CA, U.S.A.)

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About this Item: John Murray, London, 1859. FIRST EDITION. With 1 folding plate. Half-morocco over marbled boards of the period. An excellent copy inscribed by Leonard Darwin, Charles Darwin's son, with related material bound in at the end, including a 2-page letter signed by Darwin, and an unrecorded offprint of a paper on Darwin's work. Preserved in a half-morocco solander box (see provenance). First edition, first issue, of Darwin's historic and pioneering work on the theory of evolution; certainly the most important biological book ever written. Bound in: 1. Half-title inscribed by Leonard Darwin: This is the first edition of the Origin -- written by my father -- containing a passage on p. 184 which he always regretted to have omitted in later editions -- 10 April 1927. Refers to the black bear and the possibility of their development by natural selection into aquatic animals, reprinted in the first four American editions (Osborn, Book Collector, Vol. 9, No. 1, pp. 77-78 (1960); Freeman, p. 76).2. ALS. Charles Darwin to Lady Drysdale. [ca. 1859]. 2 pp. (possibly lacking 1 page). The letter is addressed to the mother-in-law of Dr. Lane, whose Moor Park spas Darwin and his wife frequented after 1857. The letter was probably written while Darwin was at a hydropathic spa in Ilkley, Yorkshire from October to December, 1859. At that time Lane was moving to Sudbrooke Park, Surrey, which Darwin and his wife visited the following year.3. ALS. George Augustus Rowell to Sir James Emerson Tennent (of Tempo Manor). 3 Alfred Street, Oxford, December 12, 1860. 3 pages.4. ROWELL, George Augustus. "Mr. Darwin's Theory." Reprinted from the Oxford Chronicle of Dec. 8, 1860. 8 pp.First edition of this unrecorded offprint on Darwin's theory of how instincts are neither endowed nor learned, but a result of "accidental natural selection." Rowell states that Darwin fails to sufficiently support his case, and "actually his examples of the cuckoo and the bee sting demonstrate the wisdom of the Creator." Interestingly enough, the author unwittingly offers further evidence in support of Darwin's theory.Provenance: This copy of the Origin was presented to Sir James Emerson Tennent (1804-1869), best known for his works on the natural history of Ceylon, by George Augustus Rowell (1804-1892), underkeeper of the Ashmolean and of the Oxford University Museum. The Rowell letter notes that he became despondent about his scientific work and burned all his manuscripts, papers and apparatus. He eventually changed his mind, and in 1862 published a second edition of his pamphlet on pain. A slip bound in at the end by Sir Charles Langham, Baronet of Tempo Manor notes that Leonard Darwin had signed the book while visiting him, and that in 1946, the book was appraised at £ 20. Dibner, Heralds of Science, 199; Freeman, 373; Printing & the Mind of Man, 344b. Seller Inventory # 13831

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Narrative of the Surveying Voyages of His: BEAGLE] KING, Phillip

BEAGLE] KING, Phillip Parker, Robert FITZROY and Charles DARWIN

Published by Henry Colburn, London (1839)

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From: Hordern House Rare Books (Surry Hills, NSW, Australia)

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About this Item: Henry Colburn, London, 1839. Four volumes, octavo, with four charts bound in and eight loose folding maps (two accompanying each volume in original endpaper sleeve), and a total of 44 engraved plates after Augustus Earle and Conrad Martens; an attractive set in the original uniform publisher's cloth; slipcase. First edition, comprising first issues in the original cloth bindings, of the full narrative of one of the greatest marine and scientific surveys of all time. The first published account of the voyages of the Beagle, this famous publication includes the full account written by Charles Darwin, the first major work published by him. As the greatest voyage of the intellect, as the voyage has been described, the Beagle voyage of 1831-36 perfectly encapsulates the spirit of the historical period of Enlightenment voyages as well as being one of its highest achievements, a voyage of discovery that would change scientific thinking and ultimately the understanding of man's place in the universe.The voyage is renowned above all else because of Fitzroy's choice of Charles Darwin as naturalist, but the narrative also includes a large section written by Phillip Parker King describing his experience aboard the Beagle, work which confirmed his status as the pre-eminent Australian cartographer.'Fitzroy, who was more concerned with science than were many naval officers of his day, made it possible for Darwin to visit tropical lands and study their flora, fauna, and geology. The two men shared the same cabin and Fitzroy was attentive to the scientific needs and interests of the young Darwin. Fitzroy's violent temper and his conservative opinions on religion and slavery were responsible for some disagreements between them, but Fitzroy and Darwin remained on friendly terms' (DSB). Many years later Darwin reflected in his autobiography that Fitzroy's character 'was in several respects one of the most noble which I have ever known' and expressed his immense debt to his time in the Beagle: 'The voyage of the Beagle has been by far the most important event in my life, and has determined my whole career?'.Publication of Darwin's journal had been urged by Fitzroy during the voyage. It was finally included as the third volume of the official Narrative, which was under the overall editorship of Fitzroy, and it was in this form that Darwin's first book was published. Immediately popular, it was reprinted several times with different titles, but is widely known today as The Voyage of the Beagle. Freeman notes 'His first published book is undoubtedly the most often read and stands second only On the Origin of Species as the most often printed'. It was also one of Darwin's personal favourites, as he writes in his autobiography: 'The success of this my first literary child tickles my vanity more than that of any of my other books'.Volume I of the Narrative concerns the initial surveying expedition of the coasts of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego, 1826-30, under Phillip Parker King in the Adventure, during which Fitzroy succeeded Pringle Stokes as commander of the accompanying Beagle. Volume II describes Fitzroy's continuation and completion of the survey with the Beagle alone in South America, Australia, New Zealand, Tahiti, and many other groups in the course of the circumnavigation. 'The surveys he carried out in South American waters established Fitzroy as a first-rate hydrographer and won for him the gold medal of the Royal Geographical Society (1837). Because his marine surveys were accurate to such a high degree they are still used as the foundation for a number of charts of that area' (DSB). Volume II includes a separately bound appendix of bearings and observations by Fitzroy that is likewise accompanied by two folding maps.This set comprises first issues of all three volumes. Demand for the third volume - Darwin's work - so exceeded that for the first two volumes that it had to be rapidly reissued in 1839 as a publication in its own right with the substantially different ti. Seller Inventory # 4304414

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About this Item: Henry Colburn, London, 1839. First edition. First issue. With 44 lithographed plates, most with tissue guards, 4 charts and maps inserted, 8 charts and maps loose in cover pockets, text woodcuts. Original cloth; upper back skillfully repaired, fore edge waterstain to vol. 2 frontispiece, plate unaffected, otherwise interiors especially clean. Overall an excellent set. First edition, first issue recording the historic voyage of the Beagle, including Darwin's Journal which forms the third volume of the Narrative. This set is of great rarity; it contains Darwin's first published book, the beginning of a whole new conception of the origin and evolution of the various species of life on earth. Captain Robert Fitzroy (1805-1865) commanded the five-year expedition, during which time the Beagle visited Brazil, Argentina, Tierra del Fuego, Chili, Peru, the Galapagos Islands, New Zealand, Australia, and other countries and islands on the way. Darwin's account of the voyage is one of the most important records of natural history exploration ever written, and provided a foundation for the entire structure of modern biology. Seller Inventory # 15212

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Darwin, Charles; King, Parker P. Captain; Fitz-Roy, Robert, Captain

Published by Henry Colburn, Great Marlborough Street, London (1839)

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About this Item: Henry Colburn, Great Marlborough Street, London, 1839. Hardcover. Condition: Very Good+. First Edition. Boards with light rubbing to extremities but in lovely shape for its age ; 3 volume set and appendix in separate book. Vol. I: Proceedings of the first expedition, 1826 - 1830, under the command of Captain P. Parker King. Vol. II: Proceedings of the second expedition, 1831 - 1836, under the command of Captain Robert Fitz-Roy, Vol. III: Journal and Remarks. 1832 - 1836, by Charles Darwin, Appendix to the second volume in separate book. - Original dark green boards with blindstamped decoration. Maps in front pockets of each volume. This is the official account of the most famous nineteenth century naval exploring expedition, of which Darwin's contribution amounts to the entire third volume of the work. This third volume is here in its very first issue and includes all Darwin's observations made during the expedition. Darwin's volume is twenty years before he published one of the most influential books ever written, "Origin of Species"; 8vo; xxiii, 597; xiv, 694; xiv, 615; 352, 16 pages. Seller Inventory # 12568

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About this Item: London: John Murray, 1859. 8vo, ix, 502 pp. with a folding diagram facing p. 117. A very good copy, rebound without the ads in contemporary three-quarter brown calf, rebacked with backstrip laid down, marbled paper boards, edges and endpapers, gilt pannelled backstrip with red morocco label, minor rubbing to the boards and backstrip, page 23/24 skillfully repaired. Inscribed on the title page "George Stuart White Captain 92nd Highlanders 1st September 1865". Bookplate of John C. Hay on front paste down. First edition of the single most important scientific book ever published. "The publication of [On the Origin] ushered in a new era in our thinking about the nature of man. The intellectual revolution it caused and the impact it had on man's concept of himself and the world were greater than those caused by the works of Copernicus, Newton, and the great physicists of more recent times. . . . Every modern discussion of man's future, the population explosion, the struggle for existence, the purpose of man and the universe, and man's place in nature rests on Darwin" (Ernst Mayr). Dibner 199. Freeman 373. Garrison and Morton 220. Horblit 23b. Norman Library I, 594. Printing and the Mind of Man 344b. 1250 copies were printed.Provenance: George Stuart White (1835-1912), officer of the British Army and recipient of the Victoria Cross; John C. Hay (bookplate); private collection, California. Seller Inventory # 110417

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Narrative of the Surveying Voyages of His: DARWIN, Charles (1809-1882)
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About this Item: London, Henry Colburn, 1839, 1839. Hardcover. Condition: Near Fine. 3 vols in four (vol 2 having a separate Appendix), 8vo (235 x 145 mm), pp xxviii [iv] 1-559, 556-597 [recte 601]; xiv [ii] 694 [2]; viii 352; xiv 629 [609]–615, with 8 engraved folding maps and charts (loosely inserted in pockets at the front of each volume, as issued, the ribbon for extracting the charts still present in each pocket), 48 plates and charts, and 6 text illustrations; a very clean copy in original publisher’s cloth, spines slightly faded as often. First edition, a very attractive set, duplicate from the Bodleian Library, of the complete narrative of ‘one of the most famous scientific expeditions in history’ (DSB). The third volume comprises Darwin’s own journal of his voyage in the Beagle, which is the first issue of his first published book. Darwin’s Journal of researches, as it became known, was his first formal publication and a classic of natural history travel narrative. It was perhaps the most important scientific voyage ever undertaken, for it gave impetus and direction to all of Darwin’s later research. ‘The five years of the voyage were the most important event in Darwin’s intellectual life and in the history of biological science. Darwin sailed with no formal scientific training. He returned a hard-headed man of science, knowing the importance of evidence, almost convinced that species had not always been as they were since the creation but had undergone change. He also developed doubts of the value of the Scriptures as a trustworthy guide to the history of the earth and of man, with the result that he gradually became an agnostic. The experiences of his five years in the Beagle, how he dealt with them, and what they led to, built up into a process of epoch-making importance in the history of thought’ (Gavin de Beer in DSB). Volume I of the Narrative concerns the initial surveying expedition, 1826–30, under Philip Parker King in the Adventure, during which FitzRoy succeeded Pringle Stokes as commander of the accompanying Beagle. Volume II describes FitzRoy’s continuation and completion of the survey with the Beagle alone, ending in 1836. ‘The surveys he carried out in South American waters established FitzRoy as a first-rate hydrographer and won for him the gold medal of the Royal Geographical Society (1837). Because his marine surveys were accurate to such a high degree they are still used as the foundation for a number of charts of that area’ (DSB). Provenance: Bodleian Library, Oxford, with small shelf labels on front pastedowns and discreet duplicate release stamp on blank margins of titles and two other leaves, on pastedown shelf label only in vol II; no other institutional markings. The Bodley was the first of the six legal deposit libraries in Great Britain; it would have been sent the Beagle volumes upon publication as required by law Freeman 10; Freeman Companion p 213; Norman 584. Seller Inventory # 4109

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Charles Darwin

Published by Cambridge University Press (2009)

ISBN 10: 0521867096 ISBN 13: 9780521867092

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From: EasyBook Bookstore (Palmela, STB, Portugal)

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About this Item: Cambridge University Press, 2009. Condition: New. Seller Inventory # 9780521867092

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Autograph letter signed.: Darwin, Charles, English

Darwin, Charles, English naturalist (1809-1882).

Published by Down, Beckenham, Kent, 11 Nov. [1870]. (1870)

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About this Item: Down, Beckenham, Kent, 11 Nov. [1870]., 1870. 8vo. 3 pp on bifolium. On Darwin's embossed letterhead (Down, Bromley, Kent, S.E.) with "Bromley" crossed out and changed to "Beckenham" in Darwin's hand. To Philip Lutley Sclater, who has been reading the proofs of Darwin's "Descent of Man", describing the ornithologist William Henry Hudson (1841-1922) as "a hater of evolution": "I will most gladly accept your kindness. I look at the delay caused as nothing comparatively to the great benefit. I never expected or hoped for many criticisms, but I still hope you will point out any serious error, whatever trouble this may cause to my Printers. I suppose I shall soon receive Revises, but Messrs Clowes [the printers of The Descent of Man] sometimes delay the 2d proofs till 23 of a whole vol. is corrected in first proof. - Mr Hudson's paper is very interesting & it pleases me to see so staunch a hater of evolution a little staggered at the end of his paper [.] I will not now waste quite so much time in trying to find every name quoted in some book; so you will doubly help me". - One of the earliest known examples of the use of the term "evolution" in the Darwinian sense, pre-dating its first appearance in print in "The Descent of Man". Although the term had long been in use in embryology, having been introduced with a specific meaning in 1762 by Charles Bonnet in his "Considerations sur les corps organisées", its use had been avoided by Jean-Baptiste Lamarck in his 1809 work, "Philosophie Zoologique"; likewise, Darwin long resisted its use in the field of ontogenesis (biological development), preferring instead the phrase "descent with modification". In the last sentence of the first edition of "Origin" (1859), Darwin did use the verb "evolved" ("From so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved"), but he had still not yet settled on the term "evolution" to articulate his most important theory. In 1862, three years after the publication of "Origin", Herbert Spencer provided his own ontogenetic definition of the term in "First Principles": "Evolution is a change from an indefinite, incoherent homogeneity, to a definite, coherent heterogeneity; through continuous differentiations and integrations." This definition failed to grasp a principle that Darwin had already recognised - that of adaptive complexity, or the idea that natural selection will tend to favour the evolution of new, specialised varieties. It was this feature that distinguished Darwin's theory from that of Lamarck, as well as from those of Spencer and other contemporaries, and which would become the central organizing principle that biologists use to understand the world. - The word "evolution" occurs for the first time in any of Darwin's printed works in "The Descent of Man" (vol. 1, p. 2), first published on 24 February 1871; Darwin then uses it - as a noun - in the revised 6th edition of "Origin" (published on 19 February 1872). - Original folds, a few toning spots, otherwise fine. Provenance: collection of Sir Edward Ford (1902-86), distinguished physician and philanthropist, Sydney; believed to have been acquired by Ford in London in the 1960s, from either Maggs Bros. or Winifred Myers. Accompanying this Darwin letter is a photocopy of a handwritten letter addressed to Sir Edward Ford from Dr. David Kohn, associate editor of The Collected Letters of Charles Darwin (later the Darwin Correspondence Project), dated 30 January 1978 and asking for copies of the Darwin letters in his collection and his permission for them to be published. Darwin Correspondence Project, no. 7366. Seller Inventory # 46975

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About this Item: Smith, Elder and Co, London, 1846. Seller Inventory # 14205

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DARWIN, CHARLES.

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About this Item: About 65 words, entirely in Darwin's hand; with ink corrections; the text is slightly different than that in the published text. This ms. leaf is tipped into a copy of The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin, Including an Autobiographical Chapter. Edited by His Son Francis Darwin. London: John Murray, 1887. First Edition; three volumes; bound in 3/4 leather and marbled paper boards by Bickers & Son, Leicester. Very minor wear and spotting. On the first blank, prior to the tipped-in leaf, it is inscribed 'Good Wishes for the welfare of the Germantown Hospital. Francis Darwin, Feb 6, 1900.' Below it is inscribed by his brother, The annexed paper is from the M.S of Insectivorous Plants. Feb. 6 1900. G.H. Darwin.' Just below, George has endorsed it at Haverford [Pennsylvania] on April 16, 1906, also signing the verso of the leaf, which bears his calculations, '(mathematical work by G.H. Darwin Apr 16 1906).' George, a prominent astronomer and mathematician, married a Philadelphian. [With] a second edition of Insectivorous Plants. London: John Murray, 1888. This edition was revised by Francis, and printed drawings by Charles Darwin, as well as some by Francis and George. The hinges of this copy are cracked, but it is largely in very good condition. The Life and Letters is in a custom quarter-morocco clamshell box. All books described as first editions are first printings unless otherwise noted. Seller Inventory # 32776

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Darwin, Charles, English naturalist (1809-1882).

Published by Down, Beckenham, Kent, 13. I. 1881. (1881)

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About this Item: Down, Beckenham, Kent, 13. I. 1881., 1881. 8vo. 2 pp. Bound before: Krause, Ernst. Erasmus Darwin. Translated from the German by W. S. Dallas. With a preliminary notice by Charles Darwin. London, John Murray, 1879. 8vo. IV, 216 pp. With a portrait frontispiece and a fullpage illustration. Full calf with marbled endpapers, all edges gilt, gilt inner dentelle, leading edges gilt. With Darwin's dedication pasted to endpaper, Leslie Stephen's autogr. ownership and notes above and below. To the writer and critic Sir Leslie Stephen (1832-1904), whose copy this book is, responding to Sir Leslie's reassurances after having been attacked by the novelist Samuel Butler (1835-1902): "My dear Leslie Stephen. Your note is one of the kindest which I have ever received, & your advice shall be strictly followed. It was very good of you, busy as you are, to take so much trouble for me; but your trouble will not be thrown away, in so far as when in the dead of the night the thought comes across me how I have been treated, I will resolutely try to banish the thoughts, & say to myself that so good a judge as Leslie Stephen thinks nothing of the false accusation. The Litchfields & some of my other children are intensely curious to read your judgment. Believe me / yours ever gratefully / Charles Darwin. / I have written on opposite page my name if you think fit to paste it into the Life of E.D.; but I much wish that you would name one or more of the books, written wholly by myself, which I could treat in the same manner for you." Indeed, the dedication "From Charles Darwin / with kindest regards / Jan. 13th 1881" has been cut out and mounted on the flyleaf, and underneath Sir Leslie has added by way of explanation: "The letter upon the next page refers to a silly attack made upon Darwin by Butler of 'Erewhon' etc. I had given Darwin the obvious advice to take no more notice of the creature, D. having already made a sufficient acknowledgement of a trifling error. For details see 'Academy' of the period. LS. - Darwin afterwards sent me the 'Origin of the Species' & the Voyage of the Beagle." - The physician Erasmus Darwin (1731-1802), Charles's grandfather, espoused an early theory of evolution all his own, which he sketched, obliquely, in a question at the end of a long footnote to his popular poem "The Loves of the Plants" (1789). Samuel Butler rejected Charles Darwin's theory of natural selection. In his 1879 book "Evolution, Old and New" he accused Darwin of having borrowed heavily from and distorted Buffon, Erasmus Darwin and Lamarck, trying to reinstate these earlier thinkers and with them, the design argument. - Provenance: By descent to Leslie Stephen's daughter, the writer Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), who left it to her husband, the writer Leonard Woolf (1880-1969). Woolf had the book auctioned at Sotheby's a year before his death (sale of Feb. 29/20, 1968, lot 279); acquired by a northern Swedish collector, whose descendants returned it to the trade. Seller Inventory # 45464

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DARWIN, CHARLES.) CAMERON, JULIA MARGARET

Published by Julia Margaret Cameron, 1868 (1868)

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About this Item: Julia Margaret Cameron, 1868, 1868. No Binding. Condition: Near Fine. THE ICONIC PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN, boldly signed by Charles Darwin and by Julia Margaret Cameron. Albumen print on paper (2¼ x 3½ in.), carte-de-visite mount with gold lithograph gold border. Inscribed by Cameron “From life Copyright Julia Margaret Cameron.” Very good condition. Julia Margaret Cameron’s portrait of Darwin is the most famous photograph of a 19th-century scientist. Darwin remarked, “I like this photograph very much better than any other which has been taken of me.” In 1868, Darwin and his family traveled to the Isle of Wight, both for a long holiday and to aid in his recuperation from a recent illness. The Darwins rented a house from Cameron and were immediately charmed by the photographer: “She received the whole family with open-hearted kindness and hospitality, and Darwin always retained a warm feeling of friendship for her. When they left she came to see them off, loading them with presents of photographs. Moved, Darwin said: ‘Mrs. Cameron, there are sixteen people in this house, all in love with you.’ Darwin paid her for her portraits of him, and as the Camerons had by that time lost a great deal of money through the continued failure of the coffee crop, she gladly accepted payment and ran boasting to her husband, ‘Look, Charles, what a lot of money!’” (Gernsheim, Julia Margaret Cameron). Signed by Author(s). Seller Inventory # ABE-18950489200

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Darwin, Charles

Published by Indypublish.Com 2004-09-01 (2004)

ISBN 10: 1414216408 ISBN 13: 9781414216409

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About this Item: Indypublish.Com 2004-09-01, 2004. Paperback. Condition: Fine. 1414216408 Like New Condition. Ships Immediately. Seller Inventory # Z1414216408Z1

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DARWIN Charles FITZROY Robert

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From: Bauman Rare Books (Philadelphia, PA, U.S.A.)

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About this Item: 1839. First Edition. "DARWIN, Charles, FITZROY, Robert, and KING, Philip Barker. Narrative of the Surveying Voyages of His Majesty's Ships Adventure and Beagle, between the Years 1826 and 1836, Describing their Examination of the Southern Shores of South America, and the Beagle's Circumnavigation of the Globe. London: Henry Colburn, 1839. Four volumes. Octavo, period-style three-quarter brown calf, raised bands, burgundy and black morocco spine labels, marbled boards, endpapers and edges. $46,000.First edition of the account of the most famous voyage in the history of biological science and modern thought. Volume III is the first issue of Darwin's Journal, his first published book, containing the observations and fieldwork that form the basis for On the Origin of Species."The five years of the voyage were the most important event in Darwin's intellectual life and in the history of biological science. Darwin sailed with no formal scientific training. He returned a hard-headed man of science, knowing the importance of evidence, almost convinced that species had not always been as they were since the creation but had undergone change The experiences of his five years in the Beagle, how he dealt with them, and what they led to, built up into a process of epoch-making importance in the history of thought" (DSB). Darwin's Journal, "his first published book, is undoubtedly the most often read and stands second only to On the Origin of Species as the most often printed" (Freeman, 31). It is "one of the most interesting records of natural history exploration ever written and is one of the most important, for it was on this voyage that Darwin prepared for his lifework, ultimately leading to The Origin of Species" (Hill I:104-05). Volume I contains Captain King's account of the first expedition, which surveyed the coasts of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego; Volume II, with its appendix volume, is Captain Fitzroy's account of the second voyage of the Beagle. Complete with 44 plates, four inserted charts and maps, and eight folding maps. (Folding charts and maps, originally issued loose, have been bound into their respective volumes, at the rear.) Bound with half titles, except for Appendix to Volume II. Bound without publisher's advertisements at rear of Appendix volume. Freeman 10. Norman 584. Hill I:104-05. Sabin 37826. Faint evidence of inkstamps on title pages.Text and plates generally clean, folding maps in excellent condition, with only the occasional short split or bit of archival reinforcement to verso. Period-style bindings handsome and fine. A most desirable about-fine copy.". Seller Inventory # 107707

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Autograph letter signed, to Frederick Howlett, concerning: DARWIN, Charles (1809-1882)

DARWIN, Charles (1809-1882)

Published by Down, Beckenham, Kent, 21 September [1878] (1878)

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About this Item: Down, Beckenham, Kent, 21 September [1878], 1878. No Binding. Condition: Fine. 3 pages on a single folded sheet (sheet 200 x 259 mm), with the envelope address panel in Darwin’s hand on blank page, in very good condition. A fine, substantive letter concerning inherited traits from a common ancestor versus adaptation due to similar environments. Howlett had raised questions about a common ancestor in the evolution of certain features common to camels and ostriches, one of which concerned their similar blood cells. Darwin replied: ‘ . I sh[oul]d doubt almost the peculiar shape of the corpuscles in the Camelidae being due to inheritance from a remote progenitor; & most of the points which you specify as being alike in camels & ostriches could be accounted for, as it appears to me, more probably by adaptation to similar conditions, rather than to inheritance from a common ancestor, extremely remote in time .’ Darwin starts off by confessing that he ‘cannot throw a gleam of the obscurest light on your difficult problem, which has sometimes seemed to me as a most perplexing one. But in fact we do not know enough of the meaning of the shape or size of the blood corpuscles or of scarcely any histological characters .’. The letter contains several corrections and insertions, indicating that Darwin struggled to provide a precise reply to Howlett’s queries. It is unusual for the original envelope or its address panel with postage and cancellation to be preserved, as here, with Darwin’s letters. This appears to be the only communication Darwin had with Howlett. Frederick Howlett (1821–1908), clergyman and astronomer, was awarded his BA in 1844 (Oxford, Worcester College) and his MA in 1851. He made careful drawings of sunspots over a 35-year period, using a 3-inch refracting telescope. These drawings, in eight volumes, are in the Royal Astronomical Society archives (J.M. Vaquero and M. Vázquez, The Sun Recorded Through History, 3.5.10) Darwin Correspondence Project 11701F (summary only). Seller Inventory # 4137

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Darwin, Charles, Naturforscher (1809–1882).

Published by Down House (Kent), 4. April 1866. (1866)

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About this Item: Down House (Kent), 4. April 1866., 1866. 5 SS. auf 3 Bll. Gr.-8vo. An Rudolf Suchsland, den Sohn des Verlegers Friedrich Emil Suchsland, über eine Neuübersetzung von „The Origin of Species": „[.] I feel that I am bound not in any way to support another edition. For this reason alone I am sorry to say that I cannot offer to send clean sheets of the new English edition of the Origin as they are printed off; and the corrections & additions are so numerous that they c[oul]d be sent in no other way. With respect to your enquiry about my other works in your list you give the same book twice over with different titles [.]". – Weiters über sein „Journal of researches", „The Zoology of the Voyage of [H.M.S.] Beagle", die „Geological observations on the volcanic islands", die „Geological observations on South America" und andere seiner Werke. – Auf Briefpapier mit gepr. Adresse; etwas knittrig und fleckig; Bl. 3 mit kleinen Randschäden und stärker knittrig und fleckig. Seller Inventory # 22408

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Autograph letter signed ("Ch. Darwin").: Darwin, Charles, English

Darwin, Charles, English naturalist (1809-1882).

Published by Down, Beckenham, Kent, 7 Sept. [1874]. (1874)

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About this Item: Down, Beckenham, Kent, 7 Sept. [1874]., 1874. 8vo. 2 pp. on bifolium. To the British architect William Cecil Marshall (1849-1921), whom Darwin engaged to build an extension to Down House on the north side (a billiard room with dressing room and bedroom above) in 1876, thanking him for some Pinguicula leaves, from which he has picked off sixteen seeds: "My dear Mr Marshall, I am very grateful to you. Your observations are excellent, & are put most clearly & will be very useful to me. I have picked off 16 seeds from this lot! The plant is certainly to a certain extent graninivorous also somewhat graminivorous, though mainly insectivorous. The rain, I know washes off the secretion & with it captured insects (& as you say seeds), which are retained by the incurved edges, which then become more incurved. It is a pretty experiment to put a row of flies or cabbage seeds on one margin of a flat leaf & see how the edge of the side curls over in from 12 to 24 hours. With cordial thanks, Yours very sincerely [.]". - Traces of folds; professionally repaired. On stationery with printed address. Darwin Correspondence Project no. 9627F. Seller Inventory # 45467

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Charles Darwin

Published by John Murray (1860)

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From: Festival Art and Books (Machynlleth, POWYS, United Kingdom)

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About this Item: John Murray, 1860. Hardcover. Condition: Very Good. No Jacket. 2nd Edition. 2nd Edition, Presentation copy to Frederick Moore on behalf of Charles Darwin. No foxing, no repairs, rubbing to spine head and corner. Bright title and cover clothe. Very nice condition. Rather than describe the condition in minute detail here, please ask for a full set of photos and catalogue. We are selling an entire first and early edition collection of Darwin and other Victorian naturalist. in many cases we have several copies of the same Darwin titles in similar condtion, including presentation copies. Please ask for a complete catalogue. Signed by Author(s). Seller Inventory # 01267

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DARWIN, Charles (1809-1882), Robert FITZROY (1805-1865) and Philip Parker KING (1793-1856).

Published by London: Henry Colburn, 1839. (1839)

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About this Item: London: Henry Colburn, 1839., 1839. 4 volumes 8vo (9 x 5 6/8 inches): 47 engraved plates (spotted and a bit browned) and 9 folding maps by J. Gardner and J. and C. Walker, including one loose in pocket at end of volume II (one or two repairs at folds); lacking the half-title in volume I. Modern full navy morocco, gilt. PROVENANCE: with the faint penciled ownership inscription of Rev. John Allen Wedgwood (1796-1882), who officiated at the wedding of his cousins Emma Wedgewood and Charles Darwin in 1839, on the half-title of volume III. "IT DETERMINED MY WHOLE CAREER" (Darwin). First edition, first issue of volume III, which is Darwin's "Journal and Remarks 1832-1836" and his first printed book, and a pleasing association copy. This celebrated voyage, which lasted five years, was the "key formative event in Darwin's life. It 'determined my whole career' (Autobiography, 76), giving him an unrivalled opportunity to make observations, collect animals and plants, and explore some of the most beautiful, desolate, and isolated places in the world. Under FitzRoy the voyage's objectives extended to include geophysical measurements, and the 'Beagle' was equipped with a variety of instruments and devices, including a lightning conductor and a large number of marine chronometers for measuring longitude. The Admiralty intended the officers to make a chain of exceptionally accurate measurements round the globe. The ship also carried out trials on Beaufort's wind scale" (Desmond, Moore, and Browne). Between 1832 and 1836 the 'Beagle' visited the Cape Verde Islands, Brazil, Montevideo and Buenos Aires, Tierra del Fuego and Cape Horn, the Falkland Islands, Patagonia, the west coast of South America (Chiloé, Valparaíso, Lima), most famously the Galápagos Islands, Tahiti, New Zealand, Australia (Sydney, Tasmania, King George's Sound), the Cocos (Keeling) Islands, Mauritius, Cape Town, and St Helena and Ascension. In all these places Darwin collected a vast numbers of specimens: insects, birds, molluscs, small vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants, meticulously recording their provenance, appearance, and behaviour in his notebooks and diaries. Of these the specimens the greatest and most important by far became the birds from the Galápagos Islands, which the ornithologist and artist John Gould helped Darwin to classify on his return to England. The similarities and differences between the species inhabiting different islands, and between the island species and those of continental South America, gave rise to Darwin's initial thoughts on the possibility of transmutation of characteristics in species, and represents to history the origin of his revolutionary and controversial theories of evolution. REFERENCES: Freeman 10; Hill I pp 104-5; Norman 584; Sabin 37826. Seller Inventory # 72nhr162

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The Variation of Animals and Plants under: DARWIN, Charles

DARWIN, Charles

Published by London, John Murray, 1868 (1868)

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About this Item: London, John Murray, 1868, 1868. 2 vols, 8vo (221 x 138 mm), pp viii 411 [1], with 4 pp inserted advertisements dated December 1866 (see below); viii, 486, [2, publisher's advertisements, dated February 1868] with the same 4 pp inserted advertisements as in vol I; illustrations in the text; original green cloth (as described by Freeman), a fine, clean, bright copy. First edition, first issues of both volumes, presentation copy to the geologist Sir Joseph Prestwich (see below) with an inserted note on Down Railway Station stationery: 'Dec 24 With Mr. C. Darwins compliments & thanks' in Darwin's hand.This work is 'the only section of Darwin's big book on the origin of species which was printed in his lifetime and corresponding to its first two intended chapters' (Freeman). This work is notable not only for Darwin's prodigious amassing of facts concerning artificial selection of traits to demonstrate an analogy for natural selection. It also advances his hypothesis of pangenesis and gemmules, as the agents of the inheritance of characteristics. The Variation 'contained his hypothesis of pangenesis, by means of which Darwin tried to frame an explanation of hereditary resemblance, inheritance of acquired characters, atavism, and regeneration. It was a brave attempt to account for a number of phenomena which were beyond the bounds of scientific knowledge in his day, such as fertilization by the union of sperm with egg, the mechanism of chromosomal inheritance, and the development of the embryo by successive cell division. His hypothesis of pangenesis could not therefore give a permanently acceptable account of the multitude of phenomena it was designed to explain. It was, however, a point of departure for particulate theories of inheritance in the latter nineteenth century' (DSB).The first issue differs substantially from the second issue, which in fact is more a second edition, with major revisions to the text. The first issue was published in January, the second in February 1868. The two issues have considerable textual differences, but the easiest way to distinguish them is by the errata listed on p vi of vol I and viii of vol II: in the first issue five errata are listed in six lines in vol I and nine in seven lines in vol II, whereas in the second a single erratum is listed in vol I only. The publisher's binding also differs, the spines of the first having a one-line imprint, those of the second normally having a two-line imprint.Provenance: Presentation note dated December 24 in Darwin's hand loosely inserted in vol I (on 'Down, Beckenham, Kent - Railway Station, Orpington. S. E. R.' stationery); bookplate of Sir Joseph Prestwich in both volumes. Prestwich (1812-1896) was President of the Geological Society of London (1870-2) and Professor of Geology at Oxford (1874-88). He was also the recipient of a presentation copy of the first edition of the Origin. 'Prestwich had written important papers on the geology of the coalfields of Shropshire and on the water-bearing strata of the south of England. In 1859 and 1860, he turned his attention to a study of the flint implements found in France and England and their significance for the question of the antiquity of man' (Darwin Correspondence Project online). Quentin Keynes (1921-2003), great-grandson of Charles Darwin and notable collector of Darwin and Darwiniana.There are two inserted leaves in both volumes: 'Illustrated Charts of Natural History' and 'Practical Class Examination Mineralogy and Geology by J. Tennant', the latter dated December 1866, both advertising mineralogical works published by Tennant. These were probably added by Prestwich. The December 24 date of Darwin's note means he had copies in hand by the end of 1867 (or at least of vol I) although the work was not officially available until January 30 of the following year due to delay in preparing the index.Freeman 877; Norman 597 (second issue). Seller Inventory # 3978

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The Descent of Man, and selection in: Darwin, Charles

Darwin, Charles

Published by John Murray (1871)

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About this Item: John Murray, 1871. Hardcover. Condition: Near Fine. 1st Edition. Two volumes. Bound in publisher’s green cloth with blind-stamped border and central panel. On the spine, gilt roll at head- and tail-piece, with title, author and volume gilt. Black end-papers. Presented in a custom green cloth slip-case and chemise. Octavo (7 1/2” x 4 15/16”, 190mm x 125mm). Both volumes with 16 pp. of publisher's advertisements at the rear. Both volumes: fore-corners very slightly worn. Very slight dent to fore-edge of front board. Head- and tail-pieces moderately rubbed. Boards moderately bowed. Text and illustrations fresh and crisp. Advertisements mildly foxed. Vol. I: front joint starting, rear end-paper cracked at head and tail. T7-8 uncut (i.e., unopened). Vol. II: some wear to gilt title. Lower half of front end-paper cracked. 2B uncut. Ownership stamp of Canon H.P. Liddon on front blank of both volumes. This first issue of the first edition (with errata on A2v of vol. II) is the larger of two formats issued simultaneously (boards 195mm tall). 2,500 copies were published on 24 February 1871. The Descent popularized Darwin’s theories of evolution (a word that appears for the first time in the writing of Darwin on vol. I, p. 2), and put them into broader social and anthropological context. Henry Parry Liddon (1829-1890) was the Ireland Professor of Biblical Exegesis at Oxord and canon of St. Paul’s Cathedral in London; as such, he was one of the most influential figures in the Church of England. Liddon is a fascinating figure. He was godson to William Edward Parry, the arctic explorer. He travelled with his close friend Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) to Russia. The account of this, Carroll’s only trip out of the UK, was published as “Tour in 1867” and as The Russian Journal in 1935. Liddon is said to have suggested the title Through the Looking-Glass. Liddon was an associate of Darwin: they served on the Committee of the Aborigines Protection Society together. Darwin wrote a letter to J.B. Innes, dated 27 November (1878) about having heard a sermon, written by Pusey and preached by Liddon in Oxford, and disagreeing with the claim made that religion and science ought to be kept apart. In the present item, some passages have been marked out in pencil by Liddon (doubtless), indicating Liddon’s attempt to reconcile the two – to find in Darwin’s thought compatibilities with Christian doctrine: No one supposes that one of the lower animals reflects whence he comes or whither he goes,– what is death or what is life, and so forth. (vol. I, p. 62) There is no evidence that man was aboriginally endowed with the ennobling belief in the existence of an Omnipotent God. On the contrary there is ample evidence, derived not from hasty travellers, but from men who have long resided with savages, that numerous races have existed and still exist, who have no idea of one or more gods, and who have no words in their languages to express such an idea. (vol. I, p. 65) Liddon has underlined “ennobling” in the second quoted passage, and written a reference to p. 106: “The ennobling belief in God is not universal with man;” it seems clear that he is seeking material that authorizes him to present Darwinian evolution as compatible with religion. This is a belief Liddon articulated in a sermon at St. Paul’s Cathedral three days after Darwin’s death, eventually published as The Recovery of St. Thomas with a Prefatory Note on the Late Mr. Darwin, 2nd edn. London: Rivintgons, 1882 (called by his familiars “The Famous Sermon”): It may be admitted that when the well-known books on the Origin of Species and on the Descent of Man first appeared, they were largely regarded by religious men as containing a theory necessarily hostile to the fundamental truths of religion. A closer study has generally modified any such impression. (p. 29) The present item may therefore be regarded as a significant document in one of the most consequential debates in Western thought. Freeman 937, Garrison-Morton 170, Norman 599. Seller Inventory # 60239

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DARWIN, Charles.

Published by John Murray, London (1868)

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About this Item: John Murray, London, 1868. First edition, first issue, presentation copy, trimmed for presentation and with a slip of paper with inscription ?From the Author? in Darwin?s hand pasted to the front free endpaper. The term ?survival of the fittest? (borrowed at Wallace?s insistence from Herbert Spencer?s 1866 Principles of Biology) first appeared in the Variation (vol. 1, p. 6), preceding its first use in the fifth edition of the Origin of Species (1869). ?This represents the only section of Darwin?s big book on the origin of species which was printed in his lifetime and corresponds to its first two intended chapters? (Freeman). ?Its two volumes were intended to provide overwhelming evidence for the ubiquity of variation, although they would also incidentally answer Lyell and Gray, who maintained that variations had not occurred purely by chance but were providentially directed. Darwin showed that breeders indeed selected from a vast array of minute random variations. He gave numerous instances of the causes of variability, including the direct effect of the conditions of life, reversion, the effects of use and disuse, saltation, prepotency, and correlated growth. The Variation also addressed a key criticism of the Origin of Species: that it lacked an adequate understanding of inheritance? (ODNB). This work ?contained his hypothesis of pangenesis, by means of which Darwin tried to frame an explanation of hereditary resemblance, inheritance of acquired characteristics, atavism, and regeneration. It was a brave attempt to account for a number of phenomena which were beyond the bounds of scientific knowledge in his day, such as fertilization by the union of sperm and egg, the mechanism of chromosomal inheritance, and the development of the embryo by successive cell division? (DSB). ABPC/RBH list only three other presentation copies of this first issue: Sotheby?s, 10 July 2012, £8750 = $13,660; Sir John Lubbock?s copy, Sotheby?s, 11 December 1992, £1500 = $2330 (hammer) ? these two copies with presentation slip inscribed by Darwin as in the present copy ? and Sotheby?s, 15 December 2011, £61,250 = $94,860, inscribed by Darwin to his daughter Henrietta. The most recent presentation copy on the market was offered by 19th Century Shop in 2014 (Cat. 150, $35,000), with the same paper slip inscribed ?From the Author? by Darwin as in the present copy.Provenance: Paper slip inscribed ?From the Author? in Darwin?s hand pasted to front free endpaper, recipient unknown; James McBryde (bookplate on front paste-down), a Scottish chemist from near Stranraer, who co-founded an alkali firm in St Helens, Lancashire, which later merged with other chemical companies to become Imperial Chemical Industries (ICI). He owned a number of books on evolution, including several others by Darwin.On The Origin of Species was only an abstract of the long manuscript Darwin had begun writing on 14 May 1856 which he originally intended to complete and publish as the formal presentation of his views on evolution. Compared with the Origin, this work, which was to be titled Natural Selection, has more abundant examples in illustration of Darwin's argument plus an extensive citation of sources. It had reached a length of over one quarter of a million words and was well over half completed when on 18 June 1858 Darwin?s writing was dramatically interrupted when he received an essay from Alfred Russel Wallace in Borneo entitled On the Tendency of Species to form Varieties; and on the Perpetuation of Varieties and Species by Natural Means of Selection outlining his astonishingly parallel but independently conceived theory of natural selection. Darwin felt obliged to change his plans for initial publication; and, after the brief preliminary announcement was presented jointly with Wallace?s paper at the Linnean Society of London, he rapidly wrote out in eight months the new abstract of his views which appeared as the Origin of Species in 1859. But he still planned to publish a more extensive account of. Seller Inventory # 4100

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Narrative of the Surveying Voyages of His: DARWIN, Charles; Robert
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About this Item: London: Henry Colburn, 1839, 1839. 3 volumes in 4 (vols. I–III and Appendix to vol. II), quarto (234 x 145 mm). Recent half calf, red and green twin morocco labels to spines, gilt ship ornaments to compartments, marbled sides. Half-titles present, as is addenda leaf in vol. II. Recent pencilled ownership inscription to endpapers and a few early pencil annotations. A few faint blemishes, occasional slight foxing and light creasing, tiny chips at extremities of a couple of pages, a few pages opened a little roughly, some pocket maps with small chips and short tears along folds, discreet repair to some tissue-guards and folding maps. Overall a very good set. With 8 folding engraved maps in cover pockets and 48 engraved plates (including two frontispieces and one folding map). First edition, and first issue of the Darwin volume, printed before he was elected to the Royal Society and so without the letters F.R.S. after his name on the second title. The accounts of the voyages of HMS Adventure and Beagle include Darwin's first published book, his Journal and Remarks, "now famous as the genesis of his theory of evolutionary biology" (Hill). It is an outstanding account of natural history exploration, describing the fieldwork that ultimately led to the Origin of Species. "The five years of the voyage were the most important event in Darwin's intellectual life and in the history of biological science" (DSB). Darwin himself would state that "The voyage of the 'Beagle' has been by far the most important event in my life, and has determined my whole career I have always felt that I owe to the voyage the first real training or education of my mind; I was led to attend closely to several branches of natural history, and thus my powers of observation were improved" (Life and Letters, 1887, vol. I, p. 61). Volume I contains King's account of the expedition in the Adventure made between 1826 and 1830, surveying the coasts of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego. In Volume II (and its appendix) Captain Fitzroy describes the narrative of the Beagle's second voyage, between 1831 and 1836 to South America, the Galapagos Islands, Tahiti, New Zealand and Australia and other countries. Volume 3 is Darwin's account of the Beagle's voyage. The popularity of Darwin's volume exceeded the companion volumes, leading to Colburn bringing out a separate edition of it in the same year. Freeman 10; Hill 607; Sabin 37826. Seller Inventory # 127081

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DARWIN, Charles; Capt. Robert Fitzroy; Capt. Philip Parker King.

Published by London Henry Colburn (1839)

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From: Shapero Rare Books (London, United Kingdom)

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About this Item: London Henry Colburn, 1839. First edition. Three volumes in 4 (vols I-III and Appendix to vol II), 8vo., (24.5cm) 9 folding engraved maps by J. Gardner and J. and C. Walker; 47 etched plates after P. King, A. Earle, C. Martens, R. Fitzroy and others, original blue cloth gilt, repairs to spines and joints. Darwin's first published book, also his most widely read, and the account of probably the most important of all nineteenth century voyages, for it was on this voyage that Darwin prepared for his lifework, ultimately leading to The Origin of Species. Volume I contains King's account of the first expedition which surveyed the coasts of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego. He commanded this expedition in the Adventure, accompanied by the Beagle, first under Stokes and after his death by Fitzroy. The remaining volumes describe the second voyage of the Beagle which visited Brazil, Argentina, Chile, the Galapagos Islands, Tahiti, New Zealand, Australia, and other countries along the way. Fitzroy's account is contained in volume II with a separate appendix comprising a meteorological journal etc. Volume III is Darwin's account. "The five years of the voyage were the most important event in Darwin's intellectual life and in the history of biological science" (DSB). Freeman 10; Hill 1, pp104-105; Norman 584; Sabin 37826. Seller Inventory # 95371

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Charles Darwin

Published by Smith, Elder & Co (1844)

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From: Festival Art and Books (Machynlleth, POWYS, United Kingdom)

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About this Item: Smith, Elder & Co, 1844. Hardcover. Condition: Very Good. No Jacket. 1st Edition. 8vo, 225 mm, vii + 175 pp, folding map. Description of six specues of corals from the Palaeozoic formation of Van Dieman's Land by W Lonsdale pp 161-169. Inserted ads, dated Jan 1844 (not in all copies). Freeman ref F272. Near fine copy. Some sunning to the spine and covers but original cloth holding together well. Small split at top of front joint. Original yellow endpapers totally intact and little foxing. Ownership inscription on title page - WP Bennett 1844 - only ink addition. Book was boxed for presentation (1973) to Dr Hans Gaffron. Probably the rarest 1st edition Darwin - only 146 copies sold (according to Darwin, June 1846). Normal wear and tear, minor foxing, spine faded, no repairs on unusual damage. We are selling an entire first and early edition collection of Darwin and other Victorian naturalist. in many cases we have several copies of the same Darwin titles in similar condtion, including presentation copies. Please ask for a complete catalogue. Seller Inventory # 01277

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Geological Observations on the Volcanic Islands, visited: DARWIN, Charles.

About this Item: London: Smith, Elder and Co., 1844, 1844. Octavo. Original dark purple cloth rebacked with brown roan in the late 19th century, gilt titles to spine, ornamental blind-stamp to covers, mustard-coloured coated endpapers. Slight wear to extremities of binding, a couple of pale marks to front board, a few leaves just nicked at fore-edge. A very good copy, with the publisher's 24-page catalogue (dated January 1845). Folding map of Ascension Island lithographed by J. Walker after Lieut. Robert Campbell RN and 14 woodcuts in the text. First edition. This was the second of three "major geological works resulting from the voyage of the Beagle, and contains detailed geological descriptions of locations visited by Darwin. it provides valuable insights into one of the most important scientific voyages ever made" (Cambridge edition 2011). These three works were issued as separate volumes over five years — Coral Reefs (1842), Volcanic Islands (1844), and South America (1846) — however Darwin's intention was always to treat the geology of the Beagle in a single volume, so in 1851 the three parts were issued together, made up from unsold sheets and with a new title page. Freeman states that Volcanic Islands was published in November 1844; he notes the presence of "inserted advertisements Jan. 1844 in some copies" but not dated January 1845, as here. Although well represented institutionally, Volcanic Islands is in commerce decidedly uncommon, particularly in the original cloth. Freeman 272. Seller Inventory # 120354

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Darwin, Charles, English naturalist (1809-1882).

Published by Down Farnborough Kent, 8. [VIII. 1850]. (1850)

Manuscript / Paper Collectible
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About this Item: Down Farnborough Kent, 8. [VIII. 1850]., 1850. 8vo. 4 pp. on bifolium. An important letter which underscores Darwin's belief in the scientific significance of the study of Cirripedia (barnacles). To Nathaniel Thomas Wetherell: "I fear that you will think me a sad trespasser on your kindness & forbearance, when I tell you that I have not actually completed my description of Loricula; but I shall do it directly & write now to obtain your permission to take (myself) your specimen to Mr. James De C. Sowerby to [be] drawn for publication by the Palæontographical Society.- I have received Mr [John Wickham] Flower's specimens, & some from Denmark but none are related to the Loricula, which is as perplexing as ever to me.- Immediately that Mr Sowerby has with your permission figured the Loricula (& I shall take it up in a fortnight) it shall be returned to you. - Is there any safe place where I could leave it in London for you, or shall I return it by a messenger? - I believe I did once before ask you, whether you have any other fossil Cirripedia. - To save you the trouble of answering, I will assume, without I hear to the contrary that Mr Sowerby may figure it. - With my best thanks | I remain dear Sir | Yours faithfully | C. Darwin | I assure you that it has not been idleness which has delayed me, but numbers of specimens of other fossil Cirri[pe]des". - We are able to date this letter precisely because August 1850 was the only month with a 'Thursday 8th' in the period between the Palaeontographical Society's decision to publish Fossil Cirripedia and the publication of the first volume of this work in 1851, in which Loricula pulchella is described (Fossil Cirripedia (1851): 81-6). - James de Carle Sowerby drew all the figures of the specimens in the first volume of Fossil Cirripedia. At the time of writing, Darwin does not seem to have known that George Brettingham Sowerby Jr had described and figured this particular specimen in 1843. However, since that time Wetherell had cleared away more material from the specimen, revealing features not seen by G.B. Sowerby Jr, and a new drawing was made for Darwin's description (Fossil Cirripedia (1851): 81). (Darwin Correspondence Project). - Published by the Darwin Correspondence Project, University of Cambridge, as Letter no. DCP-LETT-1267. - Slight damage to paper (no loss to text) and in some parts professionally restored. Seller Inventory # 46976

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